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Mabel Hoggard: community interest materials (folder 1 of 3)

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Date
1913 to 1986
Description

Folder of materials from the Mabel Hoggard Papers (MS-00565) -- Personal papers file. This folder contains newspaper clippings, jewelry designs, a "Basic Principles of Parliamentary Law and Protocol" booklet by Marguerite Grumme (not digitized in its entirety), event programs (including Las Vegas school graduations and reunions), "Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations" booklet (November 1980), "Black Women: The Unsung Heroines, Black History Week 1979" booklet, and other miscellaneous booklets (not all are digitized in their entirety).

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man000672
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Citation

man000672. Mabel Hoggard Papers, 1903-2011. MS-00565. Special Collections and Archives, University Libraries, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Las Vegas, Nevada. http://n2t.net/ark:/62930/d1zg6kj8q

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Digitized materials: physical originals can be viewed in Special Collections and Archives reading room
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OCR transcription
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English

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application/pdf

The Las Vegas Alumni Chapter
of
KAPPA ALPHA PSI
Presents
the
FIRST ANNUAL SWEETHEART BALL
Saturday, February 16, 1974
Hilton Hotel
9 - 1 a.m. Convention Hall
Semi-Formal Couple - $5.00
5 : V O T E T I M E T O D A I R Y
<f A ' |
Jgirner B. Otto Turns Over ' Confectionerv
Business to His Brother
—Has Long Been Dairyman.
Elmer B. Otto, the well known con- ,
, fectionery dealer and dairyman, has
found it necessary to devote his entire
time to' the Esmond Dairy and;
w i l l r e l i n q u i s h t h e m a n a g e m e n t o £ ,
i the confectionery business on colum-
; bus avenue to his brother, "Walter H. j
Otto.
Elmer B. Otto has devoted twenty
years of his life to the dairy business
and since owning the Esmond his
business has rapidly increased until at
•the present time, the number of fcusftomers
served daily by hlg delivery
! wagons, run into the 'hundreds. To
secure and retain a vast patronage
like this necessitates not only the
best of milk but perfect service as
well and to assure his pat/rons of
these two requisites Mr. Otto realizes
that his full time will be taken up.
The entire output, of the Esmond
Dairy is pasteurized and daily tests
for bacteria aire carried on. It is well
worth a visit to the headquarters on
Washington street to watch the
lengthy process which each drop of
milk is subjected to before it is ready
for your table, and Mr. Otto cordially
welcomes all those who come for
the purpose of inspection.
, - - - ana carried an oil
and a_ rain coat. His actions ,
suspicious and he was arrested. •
hriday morning Bert D. Smith A
I l ' l e P°!ice that his offi^l „ ; at the corner of Washington and Wad
M tn11/^618 had been broken into anl
''"a a+i COatS' the f liens and the money were stole°na.n Ttahill
pens were found in Hariges' pocket anf
the coats he had with him were iderl
otifhfiecde . as those stolen from Smith'11
Kariges will have a hearing Satuil
day .morning. . 1
*3! Thursday
, er. The architects- claimed tha
Is | amount was due them for pre
T¥ I plans and estimates of cost ior ^
|e | building that Asher contemplate
1®' erecting in Sandusky.
It NOTICE CHAUFFEURS
M s There will he a meeting of tj
Id ! Sandusky Chauffeurs' Association tfcl
at i evening at 7 o'clock at the bloail
p- ; House. All chauffeur's are requestl
a- j to be present. I
jre H. B. VINCENT, President]
|er! oct 31-lt


This item has not been digitized in its entirety. The original item is
available for research and handling a t the UNLV University Libraries.
Additional digitization is available upon request. Please contact
Special Collections to request additional digitization or with any
questions regarding access a t special.collections@unlv.edu.
BASIC PRINCIPLES
of
PARLIAMENTARY LAW
and
PROTOCOL
B y
M A R G U E R I T E G R U M M E
Registered Parliamentarian, N.A.P.
Certified Professional Parliamentarian, A. I. P.
Neither slavery nor involuntary servitude, except as a punishment for crime
whereof the party shall have been duly convicted, shall exist within the United
States, or any place subject to their jurisdiction.
Congress shall have power to enforce this article by appropriate legislation.
A Specio£
Urnte&j
James R. Dickinson Library
Wednesday, December 16, 1981
7:30 p.m.
University of Nevada, Las Vegas
1M HI. Axefhad
Todd M. Axelrod, executive vice
president and principal owner of
J. David Securities stock brokerage in
Las Vegas, and president of TMA
industries, Inc., has loaned James R.
Dickinson Library at UNLV one of
three original copies of the Thirteenth
Amendment to the United States
Constitution. Signed by President
Abraham Lincoln on February 1,
1865, the document accomplished
the emancipation of the slaves, a
deed Lincoln had begun two years
earlier with his Emancipation
Proclamation.
Mr. Axelrod, a 32-year-o!d native of Brooklyn, N.Y., acquired the
Thirteenth Amendment from a weli-known collector and dealer in
rare, valuable documents, adding it to his impressive collection of
original signed manuscripts, documents, letters, photographs and
autographs. Mr. Axelrod has founded the Nevada Museum of
Historical Documents to display the collection as works of art.
A young man who started his own investment business while
attending New York University, and who subsequently became
senior vice president of Bache Halsey Stuart Shields, Inc. and vice
president of Blyth Eastman Dillon, Inc. investment firms, as well as a
successful stock broker in several other major firms, Mr. Axelrod has
made a hobby of building a collection of documents, of which the
Thirteenth Amendment is the capstone.
His collection includes finely framed, signed photographs of
Presidents Theodore Roosevelt, Harry Truman and John F. Kennedy
and a series of documents — each accompanied by photos and
signatures — beginning with an invitation to the Nixon/Agnew
inauguration (signed by the president and vice president)
extending to Nixon's resignation, and ending with President Gerald
Ford's pardon of Nixon. The documents cover the unusual, such as
a iove note written in Morse code and signed by wireless telegraph
developer Guglielmo Marconi; the humorous, like an autographed
photo of the original Three Stooges; the revealing, like a personal
letter from George Bernard Shaw to a friend, indicating the
dramatist's strong pro-Nazi sentiments during World War II; and the
historic, like the unpaid note for 3,000 pounds sterling issued to
American Revolution financier Haym Salomon by the revolutionary
government.
Mr. Axelrod believes his copy of the Thirteenth Amendment which
will be displayed in the campus library for six months, to be the one
originally owned by Lincoln, because it is signed by more of the
senators and representatives who approved it than either the copy
now stored in the National Archives or the one owned by another
private collector.
Tke Hufott) o{
ike Ikhtmik
On January 1, 1863, with the Union and Confederate armies
locked in what was obviously becoming a devastating, protracted
war, President Abraham Lincoln issued his Emancipation
Proclamation, freeing slaves held in all states and regions in
rebellion against the Republic.
Lincoln agonized over the wording of his proclamation for
months, and hopes ran high among the abolitionists in 1862 that
the President would act on the slavery question. Their hopes leapt
like fanned flames when, on September 22, Lincoln issued a
preliminary proclamation warning the rebel states of his intention to
free their slaves in one hundred days unless they ceased their
rebellion against the Union.
The one hundred days passed, and Lincoln's attempt to bring the
war to an early end failed. On January 1, a large number — but by
no means all — of the slaves in America were technically freed by
presidential proclamation.
It was two years later on February 1, 1865, when Lincoln signed
the document that, after ratification by three-fourths of the States,
abolished slavery in America for all time.
The Thirteenth Amendment made constitutional law of what had
already been accomplished in fact nearly everywhere in the Union.
But approval of the measure was not unanimous in Congress;
debate on several versions of the proposed amendment was lonq
and bitter.
Public sentiment in many quarters at the time demanded that
freedom be granted the slaves, not by legally questionable
presidential proclamation, nor by legislation, but by constitutional
law. It was in this atmosphere that Representative James M. Ashley
of Ohio on December 14, 1863, offered a resolution that was
worded almost exactly as was the Thirteenth Amendment in its final
ratified text. On January 11, 1864, Senator Henderson of Missouri
offered in the Senate a resolution for abolition.
These resolutions and subsequent motions to the same effect met
with strong opposition from those congressmen who believed that
decisions on slavery were the prerogatives of the States.
The Senate finally passed an abolition resolution on April 8, 1864,
and it was immediately sent to the House, where it failed to receive
the necessary two-thirds majority before the legislative session
ended on June 15.
In the interim between the two sessions of the Thirty-eighth
Congress, the Union began to make significant progress in the war,
the Republican party made gains in a Congressional election, a
movement for freedom had begun in the border states, and
Lincoln was given strong public support in his reelection.
When Congress reconvened in January, Lincoln recommended
that the House reconsider its vote on the proposed amendment,
making it clear that the recent election virtually guaranteed the
Thirty-ninth Congress would approve the measure it the present
body failed to do so.
Representative Ashley called up his motion for consideration on
January 6, 1865, and it was passed on January 31. Lincoln signed it
the next day, and the Thirteenth Amendment was added to the
Constitution on December 18, 1865, after ratification by the
legislatures of three-fourths of the States.
Early Symptoms, Diagno sis ,aM Treatment cf
Pulmonary Tuberculosis
' A. Symptoms
1.Fatigue
2. Eervousness
3. Hcarsness
4. Insomnia
5. loss of appetite
6. Indigestion
7. Loss of Weight
S. Fever
9. Cough
10. Coughing and Spitting up Blood
a. May happen at any stage of the disease.
b. Many people have the mistaken idea that
hemorrhages only occur in the advanced stage.
11. Eight pfckfcik Sweats
B. Diagnosis
1. Tuberculin Test
a. Should be given all young people before they
reach the age of 20.
b. A positive reaction does not mean that the
individual has active T.B.
o. A positive test will.however,encourage the
parents to watch the health of the children.
2. Blood Test
a. Every individual should submit to a blood
test,which.if positive,should be cleared up.
b. Sixty per cent of adult cases admitted to
sanitariums for tubercular treatment sho\v
histories of non-treated and partially treated
cases of gonorrhea and syphilis.
C. Treatment
1. Medical Observation and Prolcngeu. Hast under a
Competent Physician's Care (Preferably in a
Sanitarium)
2. If (1) is impossible,give at hometa.
Teaspoonful doses of "Fellows Syrup of Hypcphosphites"
three times a day.
b. Concentrated Cod liver Oil,three arops.three
times a day.
c. Fifteen drops in water,three times a day,of
the following prescriptions
Hydg. Chlo. Cor gr.I.
Potassium Iodode gr.IO.
Syr Ferrous Iodide ounces 4.
d. A well regulated diet,including plenty of
fruit,miIk,and vegetables.
e. Proper rests moderate exercise.
Prepared from the booklet,"Tubereulosis Program"
by Dr.R. Gr. Warren, Three years House Physician
at Denmar,W.Va» State Tuberculosis Sanitarium.
This item has not been digitized in its entirety. The original item is
available for research and handling at the UNLV University Libraries.
Additional digitization is available upon request. Please contact
Special Collections to request additional digitization or with any
questions regarding access at special.collections(5)unlv.edu. Tuesday, July 29, 1980 LAS VEGAS SUN 15
NEW MEDICAL SOCIETY—Officers of the recently
founded Charles I. West Medical Society were instgj'ld
after the society became a member of the National
Medical Association. Dr. Phillip Smith, second from left,
secretary of the national association's board of
trustees, was assisted by Dr. Frank Staggers, left,
board of trustee member, at the installation. Installed
officers are Dr. Amanda Bleunt, center, secretarytreasurer,
and Dr. John Crear, right, president. The j
society was named in honor of Dr. Charles I. West
Child Sex Fiend
Sent Up For Life
• A 70-year-old Las Vegas man convicted last month of
sexually molesting two young boys was sentenced to life
imprisonment plus 40 years Monday.
Harold Austin Merriam, 70, of 813 E. Ogden Ave., was
convicted by a District Court jury last month of attempted
sexual assault, sexual assault and two counts of lewdness with
a minor.
District Court Judge Bob Legakes imposed the life
fentence on the sexual assault count. Each count of lewdness
carried a 10-year sentence and the attempted sexual assault
20 years.
Merriam was prosecuted by Deputy District Attorneys
n Bloxham and Karen Van De Pol and defended by Deputy
ublic Defender Gary Lieberman at the June U trial.
The boys, aged 7 and 9, testified the acts occurred Aug.
13,1979, in Merriam's home, where he took them after buying
lem hamburgers.
A psychiatrist testified that the defendant, who has
;houlder length white hair, was a "pied piper" who attracted
children by sketching their faces. r obituaries
LAVERNE RALSTON
Laverne Ralston, 53, of
Las Vegas, died Friday in a
local hospital.
Mr. Ralston was born in
Texas March 16,1927. He was
a warehouseman and had
lived in Southern Nevada
since 1960. He served in the
military during World War H.
He is survived by his wife,
Nancy Ralston of Las Vegas;
two daughters, Evelyn Lynn
..ad Shanna Lee, both of Las
egas; his father, Dallas
Iston; two brothers, Teddy
nd Terry Ralston, both of
exas; and three sisters, July
art, Becky Bates and Patsy
:rgin, all of Texas.
Palm Mortuary is haniling
all arrangements.
ELIZABETH
A. PADDEN
Services were conducted
Or Elizabeth A. Padden, 75,
$ Las Vegas, who died Friay
in a local hospital.
She was bom in New Jersey
Oct. 1, 1904. She was a
homemaker and had lived in
Southern Nevada since 1967.
Palm Mortuary is handling
all arrangements.
RULON W. GARDNER
Services will be conducted
at 2 p.m. Tuesday in the
Ocean Street, Henderson,
ward of the Church of Jesus
Christ of Latter-day Saints
for Rulon Whipple Gardner,
66, of Henderson, who died
Saturday in Henderson.
Bishop Kent Rhees will
officiate.
Mr. Gardner was bom in
Wyoming Jan. 6, 1914. He
was a truck driver for a
chemical company and had
lived in Southern Nevada
since 1948.
He is survived by Ms wife,
LaVinia W. Gardner of Henderson;
two sons, Anthony
Wells Gardner of Henderson
and Rulon Barry Gardner of
Las Vegas; two daughters,
Judith Gardner of Henderson
and Valorie Ann Davis of
Utah; two brothers, Rex A.
Gardner and Edgar M.
Gardner, both of Utah; three
sisters, Vilo Bartlow of California,
and Ruth Curtis and
Helen Adamson, both of
Utah; and five grandchildren.
Burial will be in Logandale.
DORIS E. RUCKARD
Services will be conducted
at 11 a.m. Wednesday in
Palm Chapel for Doris E.
Ruckard, 41, of Las Vegas,
who died Saturday in a local
hospital.
Mrs. Ruckard was bom in
Washington, D.C., Aug. 3,
1938. She was a homemaker
and had lived in Southern
Nevada since 1976.
She is survived by her
husband, Charles Ruckard of
Las Vegas; two daughters,
Darlene and Deborah
Ruckard, both of Las Vegas;
her sister, Elaine Woofen of
Washington, D.C.; and her
brother, Robert Woofen of
Washington D.C.
Burial will be in Palm
Valley View Memorial Park.
Palm Mortuary is handling
all arrangements.
MARJORIE E. MORRIS
Services will be conducted
at 9 a.m. Wednesday in
Woodlawn Cemetery for
Marjorie E. Morris, 65, of
Las Vegas, who died Sunday
in a local hospital.
Bishop Houston will officiate.
Mrs. Morris was bom in
Iowa June 17, 1915. She was
a homemaker and had lived
in Southern Nevada since
1957.
She is survived by her
husband, Mack M. Morris of
Las Vegas; three sons, Don
M. Morris and Mack M.
Morris Jr., both of California,
and Dana L. Morris of Las
Vegas; her daughter, Darlene
Sullivan of Texas; her
brother, Willard White of Las
Vegas; and seven grandcMldren.
Burial will be in Woodlawn
Cemetery.
HENRY REDDING
Private services were conducted
for Henry Redding,
who died at birth in Las
Vegas on July 12.
He is survived by his parents,
Michael and Diana
Redding of Las Vegas; two
orothers, Demetrius and
Michael Redding, both of Las
Vegas; and his grandparents,
Mr. and Mrs. Carl Fleming
and Mr. and Mrs. William
Redding, all of Las Vegas.
PAUL E. HARMON
Services were conducted
or Paul Elmer Harmon, 66,
of Las Vegas, who died Friday
in Las Vegas.
Mr. Harmon was bom in
Nebraska Dec. 8, 1913. He
was a store manager.
He is survived by Ms wife,
Mildred Harmon of Las
Vegas; two sons, Robert Harmon
of Montana and William
G. Harmon of Oklahoma; his
brother, George Harmon of
Wyoming; and two sisters,
Elma Curry of Wyoming and
vone Hastings of Texas.
YITO FONT ANA
Services were conducted
for Vito Fontana, 54, who
died Monday in a local hospital.
Bom Feb. 12, 1926 in
Cleveland, Mr. Fontana was
a bartender.
He is survived by his
father, Joseph Fontana; and
mother, Josephine Fontana,
both of Cleveland.
JACOB LOFTY
Services will be conducted
at 10 a.m. Thursday at
Bunker Chapel for Jacob H.
Lofty, 35, who died in Las
Vegas Sunday.
Bom Feb. 6, 1945, Mr.
Lofty was a carpenter.
He is survived by his
mother, Ruth T. Lofty, of Las
Vegas; sons Jake Lofty Jr., of
OMo, Travis Lofty, of Las
Vegas, and David Lofty and
George Lofty, both of California;
daughters Tina Lofty,
Tanya Lofty, and Torn Lofty,
all of OMo, and Randi Lofty
of California; and brother
Charles Lofty, of Las Vegas.
HOUSE
CALL
dr. timothi joh\>™
'Heart Failure'
DEAR DR. JOHNSON: My husband was recently hospitalized
for a heart problem. His doctor ultimately diagnosed
it as "heart failure." I asked if this is the same as having
a heart attack.
The doctor answered that the two are really quite
different, that my husband had not suffered a heart attack.
He said he wasn't sure why my husband had developed heart
failure, but he thought it might be a problem associated with
high blood pressure, and he has given him a drug called
Digoxin.
Can you explain, in simple terms, what heart failure is and
what Digoxin does? — Mrs. Theresa C., Ponca City, Okla.
DEAR THERESA: The phrase "heart failure" is often
misunderstood, in part because we doctors don't use the term
precisely nor do we explain it as fully as we should.
In one sense, all deaths are ultimately tied to heart failure.
When the heart stops, for whatever reason, death soon follows
unless the heartbeat can be quickly restored.
When doctors use the word heart failure, however, we're
usually referring to a situation in which the heart can't pump
adequately enough to keep up with the demands of the body
for circulating blood. Thus the heart literally fails to do its
job.
As it turns out, there are many possible causes of heart
failure. Thus tMs failure is a "symptom" rather than a
specific disease.
Some causes of heart failure arise witMn the heart itself.
A heart attack that damages enough heart muscle tissue to
interfere with the pumping action of the heart can lead to
heart failure. Also, a heart valve may not work properly,
causing inefficient pumping, and tMs too can lead to heart
failure.
In other cases, however, heart failure is associated with
a problem outside of the heart. One of the most common is
high blood pressure. TMs causes increased resistance to blood
flow in the body's peripheral arteries, forcing the heart to
work harder.
Another possible cause of heart failure is hyperthyroidism.
Excessive thyroid function tends to increase the metabolic
demands of the body, which in turn increases the pumping
demands on the heart. Sometimes the heart can't handle the
job.
Treatment for heart failure involves trying to correct the
underlying cause. Sometimes we try to strengthen the
pumping ability of the heart. Digoxin, a form of digitalis, is
one of the drugs commonly used to enhance the pumping
ability of the heart muscle.
In recent years a lot of excitement has been generated
over the use of vasodilators — drugs that tend to expand the
blood vessels and thus reduce resistance to the flow of blood.
In heart failure it is important to diagnose the underlying
cause and try to correct it quickly. Fortunately, we're
entering an era when treatment is becoming much more
effective.
§tatp Jffuuml ftmrttM
OF THE LATE
Jftm JL A- Jlerknts
December 26, 1936—1 o'clock P. M.
First Baptist Church, Williamson
REV. L. A. PERKINS, Pastor
J. COLLIN SAWYER, A. B., S. T. B.
Presiding;
I've done my work,
I've sting my song,
I've done some good,
I've done some wrong,
And I shall go where I belong;
The Lord has willed it so.
MRS. L. A. PERKINS
MUSIC SENIOR and JUNIOR CHOIRS
Miss M. D. Sesson, head of Music Department, Liberty High
School, assisted by Misses Josephine and Ruby Hogan
MEDLEY FAVORITE SONGS OF DECEASED
SONG CHOIR
SCRIPTURE—23D PSALM REV. J. W. STOUDENMIRE
PRAYER REV. A. H. HUNTER
MUSIC , CHOIR
RESOLUTIONS FRATERNAL ORGANIZATIONS
Special Program from the Women's Tug River District Convention,
of which Deceased was President at time of death.
READING MESSAGES OF SYMPATHY REV. C. H. HOGE
RESOLUTIONS —District, State and National Representatives
1 Rev. C. H. Howard, Moderator Tug River Baptist Ass'n.
2 Dr. J. M. Whittico
3 Rev. C. L. Miller, President Ministers and Deacons Union
4 J. A. Booth, President Sunday School Union
5 Rev. I. H. Gary, Pastor St. James A. M. E. Church
6 Dr. D. R. W. Meadows, Representative State Sunday School
7 State Sunday School Convention Representatives
8 Women's State Convention
9 Rev. J. C. Roach, Treasurer Tug River Association
10 Rev. P. L. Winfry, Secretary Tug River Association
11 Mrs. E. B. Thompson, representing Church and Auxiliaries
MUSIC CHOIR
MRS. L. A. PERKINS AS I KNEW HER IN VIRGINA—
Rev. P. F. Cock, pastor First Baptist Church, Huntington, W. Va.
SOLO ....._. DEACON J. E. HOGAN
MRS. L. A. PERKINS AS I KNEW HER IN WEST VIRGINIA—
Rev. J. CARL MITCHELL, President of W. Va. Baptist
State Convention, President Ministers State Union and
Vice President of the National Baptist Convention
SOLO .
- MRS. D. S. HAMBRICK
EULOGY
„ : ; -— REV. P. F. KING
President Baptist State Sunday School Convention
MUSIC ...... ...
- CHOIR
REVIEW OF LAST REMAINS
i
EULOGISTIC SERVICES
December 28, 1936
EBENEZER BAPTIST CHURCH, RICHMOND, VA.
AT 2:00 P. M.
MEDLEY Favorite Songs of Deceased.
SCRIPTURE
INVOCATION
MUSIC CHOIR
READING MESSAGES OF SYMPATHY
RESOLUTION
SOLO - — MISS FLORENCE SMITH
REMARKS ....—. _ REV. J. T. HALL
Pastor Second Baptist Church
OBITUARY
MUSIC
EULOGY E, E. SMITH....
President of the General Association
Active Life of the Late Mrs. L. A. Perkins
Organist and Directress of the Junior Choir of the
First Baptist Church
President of Tug River Baptist Womens
District Convention
First Vice President of Women's Baptist
State Convention
Directres of Music of the West Virginia Baptist
State S. S. Convention, Women's Baptist State
Convention, State B. Y. P. U. Convention and
Chairman of State B. Y. P. U. Board
Kimball Undertaking Company in charge
at Williamson, West Virginia
..... . .. ..'i
A. D. Price, Jr., Mortician in Charge
at Richmond, Virginia

PROCESSIONAL HYMNs "A Mighty Fortress Is Our God"
A mighty fortress is our God, A bulwark never failing?
Our helper Ke amid the flood Of mortal ills prevailing*
For still our ancient foe Doth seek to work us woe
His craft and pow'r are great, And armed with cruel hate,
On earth is not his equal..
That word above the earthly pow'rs- No thanks to them abideth*
The Spirit and the gifts are ours Thru Him who with us sideth,
Let goods and kindred go, This mortal life also?
The body they may kills God's truth abideth still
His kingdom is fqrver„
CELEBRANT'S GREETING AND CALL TO PRAYER
FIRST READINGS "A Life For Others"
MEDITATION SQNGs "The Father Smiled"
SECOND READINGS I Corinthians 15s51-56
SUNG RESPONSES Psalm 23 (Alleluia melody
Refrains ALLELUIA, ALLELUIA, ALLELUIA, ALLELUIA
The Lord's my shepherd / I will not want
In green pastures / Ee gives me rest
Near restful waters / Ee does lead me
Alleluia / Alleluia
Refrains ALLELUIA, ALLELUIA, ALLELUIA, ALLELUIA
And He leads me / In the right paths
For His name's sake / Alleluia
Though I walk in / the dark valleys
I fear no evil you are nerr me
Refrains ALLELUIA, ALLELUIA, ALLELUIA, ALLELUIA
With Your rod and staff / You give me courage
Alleluia / Alleluia
»
You annoint my head / with precious oil
and my cup is / overflowing
Refrains ALLELUIA, ALLELUIA, ALLELUIA, ALLELUIA
Only goodness / and kii "ness are mine
all the long days / of my whole life
I shall dwell in / the house of my God
for all years to come / Alleluia
Refrains ALLELUIA, ALLELUIA, ALLELUIA, ALLELUIA
PROCLAMATION CF TEE GOSPEL John 10
HOMILY Fr„ Barry
PRAYERS OF INTENTION AND OUR FATHER
REMEMBRANCE Tom Miller
FINAL BLESSING AND EXCHANGE OF PEACE
CLOSING SONGs "Amazing Grace"
Amazing grace, how sweet the sound
That saved a wretch like me2
I once was lost but now I'm found
Was blind but now I see
T'was grace that taught my heart to fear
and grace ray fears relieved?
How precious did that grace appear
The hour I first believedI
When we've been there ten thousand years
Bright shining as the sun,
We've no less days to sing God's praise
Than when we'd first begun
"Age is, after all, the one thing we all share.'
Jack Fagg
Dec. 14, 1980
Cover designs Sister Meinrad"Craighead, OSB
John B. DuBois
3rd Vice President
Michael Daly
Secretary
Clara W. Hill
Treasurer
Robert M. Hoenisch
President, Las Vegas YMCA
John J. Wawerna
General Director, Las Vegas YMCA
Justice John C. Mowbray
Honorary Board Member
1948 HELLBORABO AND RODEO
DEDICATION
ELKS' STADIUM
8:15 P.M., May 12. 1948
Drill Team - - Captain Peggie Morrison
Las Vegas Emblem Club No. 114
Minnie Carter, Ruby Dillingham, Ann Christiansen, Jean Roberts, Dorothy Kelsey, Pat Mason,
Mary Winters, Lee Parks, Lila Foremaster, Ruth Wright, Eva Roberts, Cloa Smith, Bonnie
Birdneau, Becky Jones, Orpha Bond, Dorothy Keyser, Grace Dykes, LaVaughn Leslie, Marie
Mace, Laura Bradley, Mary Drummond, Louise Herbster, Maxine Riddle, Grace Annabel.
Flag Bearers: Ruth McVeety, Bunny Harris. Drummers: Pauline Carrigan, Nelle Petersen.
Mounted Flag Bearers:
Sheriff Glen Jones ~ Sheriff's Posse
Art Harris President, Frontier Riders
National Anthem Led by Bette Anne Dotson
Organist Maydell Norman
Dedication Address Victor Jory
One of the nation's foremost actors, Mr. jory is a leading stage, screen and radio star.
"Vegas in Calico" 9 P. M.
Benevolent and Protective Order of Elks
Las Vegas Lodge No. 1468
1948-49 Officers:
Exalted Ruler Oscar Bryan
Leading Knight --.1 . A1 Proctor
Loyal Knight Eddie Gilbreath
Lecturing Knight Merle Sage
Esquire - Francis Brown
Tiler - — John Rasmussen
Secretary O. K. Adcock
Treasurer E. W. Cragin
Trustees James Cashman, A. G. Blad, M. W. Davis
Inner-guard R. Pollock
Chaplain . - - K. O. Knudson
Organist - William Roberts
Helldorado Director and Stadium Construction Supervisor Eddie Gilbreath
R E V I E W - J O U R N A L P R I N T

FIRST TIME ON ANY STAGE IN LOS ANGELES
THE ENEMY
A Tense Drama in Four Acts
by
CHANNING POLLOCK
American author of "The Fool," "Mr. Moneypenny," and other
successful plays
"His purpose was to show how like ourselves were creatures we should
have called contemptible; how like ourselves they thought and felt,
and how they regarded us; and so to show us ourselves through their
eyes."—William Dean Howells, with reference to "Gulliver's Travels."
THE PERSONS
(in the order in which they speak)
Carl Behrend Hugh McClanahan
Pauli Arndt Polly Cassell
Baruska Florence Sanford
Bruce Gordon Jerry Carr
August Behrend John Kennedy
Jan Harold Owen
Dr. Arndt John Haig
Mizzi Winckelman , Gene Nielson
Kurt Master George McCord
Fritz Winckelman Dave Dingilian
The action takes place in the Arndt flat in Vienna.
Act I June, 1914
Act II August, 1914
Act III March, 1917
Act IV June, 1917
During Act II, the curtain will be lowered to indicate the lapse of
several hours.
The song, "God Marches With Our Eagles," composed especially for
this production by Miss Rheta Mitchell, a member of the music staff of
Lincoln High School.
Costumes through the courtesy of the Western Costume Company.
Furniture and properties from the Cinema Props Company.
Play presented by special arrangement with Longman's Green and
This item has not been digitized in its entirety. The original item is
available for research and handling at the UNLV University Libraries.
Additional digitization is available upon request. Please contact
Special Collections to request additional digitization or with any
questions regarding access at special.collectionsPunlv.edu.
LOS ANGELES JUNIOR COLLEGE
Thursday, April 3, 2 p.m.
Friday, April 4, 8 p.m.
THE CAST
Front row, left to right: Florence Sanford, Polly Cassell, Gene Nielson
Back row: Dave Dingihan, Harold Owen, Hugh McClanahan, Jerry Carr, John
Kennedy, John Haig.
POLLY CASSELL HUGH M'CLANAHAN JERRY CARR
JOHN KENNEDY
How well we who saw "The
Queen's Husband" last semester remember
John Kennedy as General
Northrup. Because of John's fine
work in last semester's production
and this semester's "Just Suppose,"
as the romantic George, he has been
given an equally fine part in "The
Enemy," that of August Behrend, the
war profiteer, and the father of the
hero.
Mr. Kennedy came to L.A.J.C. well
prepared in stage experience. He was
graduated in the Class of Summer
'29 from Fremont High School, and
while there he played in "Hollyberry
and Mistletoe," "Jazz and
Minuet," "Captain Applejack," and
the "Romancers," the Senior play.
In the last three John carried the
lead.
John counts, among his favorite
roles, that of Captain Applejack;
first, because it was his initial, big
part in high school; next, the role
of General Northrup in "The Queen's
Husband," and his present role of
the hard-hearted war profiteer in
"The Enemy."
Mr. Kennedy plans to go on with
his dramatic training in Junior College
under Mr. Turney, and then he
hopes to study at the Pasadena Community
Players' House in Pasadena.
All things point to John's success
as a character actor in roles of bold,
hut not too bad men. We wish you
the greatest success, Mr. Kennedy.
JOHN HAIG
The elderly professor and pacifist,
Dr. Arndt, the father of Pauli, the
heroine in "The Enemy," is portrayed
by John Haig. This is a role
demanding a careful interpretation,
which John fulfills with utmost sagacity.
Mr. Haig made his debut as an
actor at Polytechnic High School
giving a reading, Edwin Markham's
"The Man With the Hoe," upon its
presentation to the school by the
RECEIVE GOVERNOR'S AWARDS — Among those
presented with awards from Governor Mike O'Callaghan
were Mrs. Robert Bateman, left to right, Herbert Gerson
Gus Harrison and Lubertha Johnson. Mrs. Bateman
accepted the award for her late husband, the Rev. Robert
Bateman. The four awards were given for outstanding
work with senior citizens by senior citizens.
I. V Sun-fftay30, /qjs".
Senior Citizens Jam Sahara
Space Center For Luncheon
By BARBARA LARSON
SUN Staff Writer
More than 900 senior citizens
jammed the Hotel Sahara
Space Center Thursday noon
for the first annual "senior
Citizen Appreciation
Luncheon" sponsored by Clark
County Committee for the Aging.
"This is a culmination of a
dream," said Mrs. Clara Bailey,
general chairman. "There are
more sehior citizens here today
than there have ever been at
any gathering in Las Vegas."
Recalling that the luncheon
took weeks of planning, and
was made possible by the efforts
and generosity of hundreds
of persons old and young,
Mrs. Bailey told the crowd:
"We as senior citizens cannot
get along without the younger
people and the younger people
can't get along without us. We
need their physical strength
and they need our wisdom and
maturity. We have so much
love to share."
There were a number of
guests in wheel chairs and
walkers, and several groups
were brought in buses furnished
by Boulevard Merchants
Association.
Special guests of honor were
some 15 persons 85 and over,
and among these were Mrs.
Violate Lee Pace, 89, and Ghs
Blad, 91, both native Nevadans
who were born and grew up
together in Panaca.
"I didn't know there were so
many older people in Nevada,"
said Mis. Pace. "I'm sorry my
wife isn't here because then
was home with a sore knee.
Special awards from Gov.
Mike O'Callaghan were
presented to 11 senior citizens
by Dr. Herbert Derfeld, chairman
of Clark County Committee
for the Aging.
Recipients, honored for their
work with other seniors, included
Clara Bailey, Fay Colen,
Smiles Cunningham, Jack
Fagg, Herbert Gerson, Gus
Harrison, Lubertha Johnson,
K. 0. Knudson, Ethel Pearson,
Allan Sanders and Alice
Turner.
The late Rev. Robert
Bateman was honored
posthumously with an award
from the governor presented to
Mrs. Bateman. "The senior
citizens of Las Vegas and Clark
County have been enriched by
his presence," said the citation.
Maggie Coleman, a volunteer
worker on the luncheon, said
more than $4,000 had been
donated by local businesses,
organizations, and individuals
toward tickets for seniors to attend
the luncheon. She said
more than 400 seniors received
free tickets, and "others were
subsidized."
Emphasizing that the
luncheon was purely to bring
seniors together and give them
a good time, Mrs. Coleman
said, "we do not want to turn
this into a political rally but I
do want you to know there are
those who made a special effort
to come."
Mrs. Coleman then introduced
candidates for Las
Vegas Mayor Bill Briare and
Harry Reid, and City Commissioner
Ron Lurie, but hushfrom
other officials and gave
special recognition to Obie
Oberlander of the Silver
Nugget, who had hired a bus
and purchased 51 tickets for
seniors to attend.
Tables for those 85 and over
were decorated with colorful
floral arrangements provided
by local garden clubs and
guests included Ovidia Belcher,
88, 2860 E. Fremont St.;
Charles Ruehle, 87, 333 N.
Maryland Pkwy.; Peggy
Abrahamm, 79, James H. Down
Towers; Lucille Nelson, 86,
4254 Gibralter St.; Emma
Wright, 85, 819 "H" St.;
Camilla Woodring, 89, 1001 N.
Main St.; and Harriet O'Brien,
85, Effie Merer, 89, Alvin
Groeschel, 85, and Delia Booth,
87, all of Harry C. Levy
Gardens.
Pepper Davis, Tropicana
Hotel promotons director, was
master of ceremonies. Seniors
providing entertainment included
the Golden Key Chrous,
the American Association of
Retired Persons (AARP)
Swingin' Ramblers, singer
Virginia Yoryiadis, 80, and
dancers Herbert and Dorothy
Cole, 67 and 65. Mrs. Yoryiadis
received a standing ovation for
her renditions of several
classical numbers accompanied
by her daughter Mart T, Shay.
Among donors of $25 or more
were Nevada State Bank, Las
Vegas Housing Authority,
Mesquite Club, Nevada Power
Company, WonderWorld, Nifty
Nickel, Musician Union Local
369, Charles Shoofey, Dick
Thompson, Riviera Employees'
Foundation, Obie Oberlander,
Hotels, and Culinary Workers |
Local 226.
Also Pat Ginn, Jackie Fields,
Central Telephone Company,
Dunes Hotel, Mr. and Mrs.
John Serviates, IBEW LOCAL
357, Bill Briare, Zion Methodist
Church, Saints and Sinners,
EOB Foster Grandparent
Program, Union Plaza Hotel,
Home Realty, St. Christopher's
Church, Summa Corporation,
Economic Opportunity Board
of Clark County, Southwest Gas
Corp.; Las Vegas Review-
Journal and Food Stamp
Employees.

Thursday, May 28, 1V70 LAS VEGAS VOICE Page 7 SENATOR BAYH BLASTS NIXON ADMINISTRATION Senator Birch Bayh (Democrat Inch) recently
declared that "the most serious danger to
America today comes not from the activities
of young militants, but from the magnitude
of the backlash that may result from the increasing
polarization of our society."
Addressing a luncheon meeting of the 57th
annual meeting of the Anti-Defamation League
of B'nai B'rith at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel,
Senator Bayh said "zealous men in well-intentioned
law enforcement shortcuts undermine
the very foundations of liberty."
In a blistering attack on President Nixon,
Vice President Agnew and Attorney General
Mitchell whom he called well-meaning men,
Senator Bayh charged that " they are also zealous
men and the zeal of this Administration exceeds
both its wisdom and its understanding."
The Senator said that "unrealistic fear ofunorthodoxy"
attaches itself to administrations
"that lack any clear sense of purpose and direction
and it spreads like a malignant growth in
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CCSD
OPEN
L I N E
The Clark County
School District is convinced
that the school
story can be told only
through two-way communication—
that school
officials must hear from
citizens as well as talk
to them.
For this reason an
experimental 30-minute
"Clark County School
District Open Line"
show will be aired live
over KLVX, Channel 10
at 8:00 p.m. Friday, May
29.
If the program is successful,
it will be a regular
monthly feature on
Channel 10 next fall.
Host for the special
show will beDistrictlnformation
Specialist
Charles Fleming, who
will field questions from
a battery of four telephones,
manned by
Channel 10 receptionists.
Fleming said he would
answer questions from
the viewing audience so
long as he had the facts
in his, head.
"If I don t have the information
immediately
available, I'll research
answers and reply by
mail at a later date," he
said.
Basically the show
will be modeled after
open line shows on local
radio stations, but
Fleming said he hoped
he had more questions
than expressions of opinion.
In other efforts to
draw responses from
the community, the District
runs an ad in the
nifty nickel and a
coupon in its quarterly
publication to parents,
asking readers to send
their questions to the
school district's information
office.
NEVADA'S
LARGEST
COMMERCIAL
PRINTER
115 North Seventh
JUST OFF FREMONT
Las Vegas
the body politic." He said that because of fear
there is public acceptance "of seemingly small
sacrifices and insignificant relaxations of timehonored
rules of law and justice."
Making clear that he did not minimize "the
need to put the full force of the law against
terror and violence," the Senator went on to
say that more vigorous law enforcement is
"at best a partial pallative, not a permanent
cure for the problems of crime and violence."
Asserting that the cure is "to eliminate the
causes of frustration before it builds to explosive
proportions," Senator Bayh said "unfortunately,
the remedies of this Administration
are essentially designed to suppress, not to
relieve."
He cited the following as part of "an unhealthy
trend toward suppression":—The Administration's
Organized Crime Bill providing
for preventive detention, no knock searches,
extensive wiretapping, lowered age limits for
juvenile court and changes in the burden of
proof in juvenile cases.
A proposal by Attorney General Mitchell
asking that the police be empowered to require
anyone they have "reasonable grounds" to suspect
of a crime to submit to "non-testimonial
identification procedures" including fingerprints,
palmprints, footprints, measurements,
blood specimens and urine samples. The Fourth
Amendment says a person can be arrested only
if there is probable cause" to believe him
guilty of a crime and, currently, a person can
be subjected to identification procedures only
after he has been arrested.
—A new regulation by the Postmaster General
authorizing the opening of mail without the addressee's
permission.
—A "blacklist" maintained by the Civil
Service Commission of "at least 1.5 million
Americans who might, at some time, have^been
involved in what federal investigators term'subversive
activity.' " , • .
—The Administration s deep seated mistrust"
of the press which leads it to "work
assiduously to undermine public confidence in
a free press while at the same time launching
a concentrated effort to intimidate the news
media."
Senator Bayh said the Administration has
made "an insidious effort to equate dissent
and disagreement with criminal attitudes or
lack of patriotism." He pointed out that history
shows that "leaders who abdicate their
responsibility to lead who refuse to face problems
when they should be faced, eventually
reap a bitter harvest of contempt for their lack
of forthrightness." He charged that the present
Administration, "frightened by innovation and
dismayed by dissent, strives for mediocrity.
"Unable to break free of conformity and
conventionality to deal effectively with the nation's
problems, it becomes ever more obsessed
with security," he declared.
According to Senator Bayh, "it is not unreasonable
to expect that a good many citizens
will explode in violent rage" because of the
nation's incapability "to arrest the deterioration
of its cities, to clean up its streets, to halt the
war in Vietnam and to stop the growth of
crime."
The Senator said that despite President Nixon's
promise "to bring us together," the Administration's
"specialty seems to be polarization
of the American people by playing on
their frustrations, prejudices and fears."
Senator Bayh said the course the nation is
pursuing is "demagogic, divisive and dangerous."
"I object", he concluded, "to the effort to
pit one American against another, black against
white, young against old, poor against affluent,
North against South. I object to efforts to mute
those who disagree. I object to anything less
than an all out effort to finish the unfinished
business of America— the business of making
this country truly a land of equal opportunity,
of restoring love not hate, compassion not
selfishness, of finding meaningful peace in our
neighborhoods, nation and world."
The Voice shall reserve the right to cancel any
advertising contract if our readers are not'
given fair and honest consideration. WE ARE
PLEDGED TO EXPOSE AND FULLY CONDEMN
all unfai? business practices.
"NEVADA
W!ND-arnQOBC©»
EL RIO CLUB
GAMBLING C A S I N O
"Friendly Atmosphere"
*di€£CC4fl - See? - TiJitie
IT'S A * KENO
• " 2 1 "
NATURAL * C R A P S
3 O f
Minimum A n y
I n d i v i d u a l T i c k e t
• S L O T S
1905 "H" ST. a t DOOLITTLE
*P•a*ge •8* •*•*•••••••
j AUDREY'S
Uj^ESSlOfls
- » by Audrey Taylor
LAS VEGAS VOICE Thursday, May 2 8 , 1970
GRAND SWEEPSTAKE A WARD WINNERS
Dear Sis,
LAS VEGAS visitors are basking in the sun,
and in the cool of the evening lil'Audrey i s
zipping along the Strip . . .And what an exciting
array of stars are appearing here. . .
Beginning at the "top" of the strip we see
up on the marquee of the SAHARA Hotel-Casino
JACK BENNY, who i s completing his sensational
engagement here. Mr, BENNY will be followed
in by the "funnyman" BUDDY HACKETT and
co-starring on the bill will be the lovely
THERESA GRAVES of T.V. " Laugh-in" fame...
The FRONTIER Hotel-Casino will have another
big opening May 28 with BOB NEWHART and
sexy ABBE LANE. . .Televisions JULIA, Miss
DIAHANN CARROLL i s closing out her successful
show at the sands hotel-casino and coming in
June 3 i s another T.V. favorite DON ADAMS.. .
Gosh s i s , with a lineup of entertainers like this
constantly in the "Entertainment Capitol" who
needs to visit any other city??—Would you
believe that there i s more?
Why Hon, GLEN CAMPBELL and DOM De~
LUISE are packing them in at the INTERNATIONAL
Hotel - Casino. . .and in the International's
CASINO THEATRE i s JERRY LEE
LEWIS, and back by popular demand i s the
fabulous group VON RYAN EXPRESS. . .But
hold on kid, opening June 1 i s number one lady
of* soul ARETHA FRANKLIN. . .WOW!!! Tell
everyone also that the BOBBY DARIN Show
i s at the LANDMARK Hotel-Casino and sharing
the bill i s musician turned comic IRWIN C.
WATSON. . .Grab this CAESARS PALACE
Hotel-Casino has signed a three year contract
with TOMMY STEELE, this very talented gentleman
will make his world nighclub debut: in
Vegas. . .
M * #
"Little" EDDIE TAYLOR has an audition all
set for one of the Strips big show rooms. This
small guy, he's only 38 ins. tall, has a very big
future.
Talented BOB MASON, a LAS VEGAN has a
few inventions that may soon be put on the
market. Also be on the "lookout" for a book of
his poems that may soon be published.
Hon, tell all the go-go dancers and musicians
that are looking for a summer job to give me a
call at 736-6106.
LIQUORS
1602 No.
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Sis i s ' n t it marvelous that DIANA SANDS
the greatest BLACK actress, in the world,was
finally awarded an EMMY?
'SyJ FRIENDLY
ROY McCORMICK has a "big deal" pending.
Wish him luck s i s , i t couldn't happen to a nicer
guy. 4= '-i- •
Will you have the folks check the record
shops for my f i r s t recording "DARLING IT'S
YOU"... • &
Remember s i s , A lady i s a woman with a
good memory: she always remembers others,
yet never forgets herself. Talk to you over
KLAV. Right on.
Love,
Audrey
VWWWWAHHPW
V.I.P. SHINE PARLOR
S o u l B r o s . - G o o d w i n & M c G o w a n , P r o p s .
SHOES DYED-REPAIRED-STRETCHED
A g e n c y f o r S t u a r t M c G t i u e S h o e s C l o t h e s
3 0 4 9 La's V e g a s B l v d . S o . ' P h o n e 7 3 5 9 7 9 1
COSMO,.,.!.;.,,,
^ LOUNGE
Principal Helen Anderson of Kit Carson
Elementary School proudly presents plaque of
merit to Mrs. Lou Venia Travis. Instructor
of the g i r l s ' and boys' marching groups which
won the Grand Sweepstake award during the
youngtimers Helldorado parade.
Students are seen showing the Grand Sweepstake
Trophy and the 1st place trophy to a
marching group.
1300 S. Main -385-3411
LOUIS CHACHERE W / DW I G H T FOSTER
O n T e n o r S a x & G u i t a r
F e a t u r i n g T h e U n i q u e S t y l e O f ,
T h e T e x a s ' S o u l S i n g e r [ 1 0 p . m . 4 a . m . BUDDY WRIGHT .Al w" -e *• -A * + mf A W e e k
* 5JUIJ
! i
PHONE 648-2111
900 WEST BONANZA ( I N T H E M O U L I N R O U G E )
Thursday, May 28, 1970 ,
* * • * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * * *
* BILLY ROWE'S *
*
*
*
*
*
*
+
LINES TO TALK ABOUT.
NEW YORK CITY—The story behind the untimely
passing of glorious soulful songstress
Gloria Lynn is reported as none too beautiful.. .
Wilson Pickett, the fella with a soul full of songs
is extremely uptight about the wrong slant of
the headlines he busted the front pages with last
week. He said it isn't true that he accused Tom
Jones, or any other artist, of stealing "Soul
Music." According to him, his point of view is
that the top rock radio stations have failed to
give black singers and musicians enough airplays,
but go all out when spinning the stuff
performed by white chirpers. . .There's a story
making the rounds that Gloria Toote, who
ran into hard times with her dream $500,000
Town Sound Studios in New Jersey, is coming
back in the business like a champ. An exciting
announcement is due from her direction before
the sun settles on either side of Tin Pan Alley.
Friends of Duke Ellington's late Johnny
Hodges, the alto - sax immortal who gave soul to
the Duke's sharps and flats before most entertainers
even read the phrase in the Bible,
are wondering who selected the Masonic Temple
in upper Harlem for his funeral. The place was
so small more than a hundred of his local
friends and VIP's from all over the country had
to be turned away and the street scene outside
of the Temple looked like a gathering of the
Who's Who of the music world.. .Julie Belafonte
and Sidney Poitier are heading up the national
drive to send Andrew Young, the man who was
closest to the late Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.,
to Congress from Alanta, Ga. The first big
bash they have planned is a $100 per dinnerdance
at the posh Pierre Hotel in big town. . .
Eddie Greene, who married into an auto fortune,
the executor of the estate of the late nationally
known Dr. Shag Hogan, is wondering who went
where with the 75G's the popular doctor had
stashed behind the teevee screen in his 115 St.
apt. With his insurance and all that, Eddie is also
wondering h'cum his former pal s funeral bill
was still unpaid as of a wk.-ago.1 have also been
told that Shag's will is going to surprise and
shake-up a lot of greedy folks.
The Grahame (Leslie Uggams) Pratts have
adopted that baby of a mixed marriage they fell
in love with when they were here vacationing
about a month ago. Leslie and her hubby flew into
town last Tuesday to sign the papers and jet -
the youngster off to H'wood for keeps the day
after. The pretty singer is up to here with engagements
for the hot months. Aside from doing
summer stock, she has been signed togueststar
on three teevee variety shows. It will be the
Andy Williams eyer in August, Dean Martin in
Nov. and the Carol Burnett bit inDec.Inbetween
all that there may even be a benefit fling for
Wilberforce U. with either Sammy Davis, and or,
Flip Wilson lending her some talent. . .The National
Council of Police Societies have some
broad plans outlined for their annual convention
in Atlantic City. Their three main topics will be
"Narcotics, The duel role of black police as a
member of the community and Racial polarity
in police departments and the role of the white
officers in the black revolution.
Sammy Davis, Jr. has signed Burt Lancaster
to co-star with him in his first important
western. They are scheduled to go before the
camera in Mexico comes June. By the way it
isn't true that Lola Falana ain't speaking to the
total talented one since his marriage to lovely
Alrrovese Gore. Like everybody who is close to
the golden lad, Lola expected the hitching, but
none of them knew when. . .Aretha Franklin has
squared away her Las Vegas differences and
will be on
to her jaunt to Europe. Her agent, the only black
woman doing such on B'way, Ruth Bowen, expects
to have had her operation and be well mended in
time to make the jet to the old country with
her prize performer. . .Illinois and Barbara
Jacquet's Pamela is set for an August wedding.
She will be married in the very holy St. Patrick's
Cathedral on 5th Ave... .Lovely Yvonne Sherrer,
Pan-Am's hostess gain from the West Indies,
LAS VEGAS VOICE Page 9
Aretha Franklin - Redd Foxx
Slated For
International Aretha Franklin, who has risen steadily from
singing in her minister father's evangelistgroup
to become the "Queen of Soul" with record
sales approaching ten million, adds still a new
dimension to her meteoric career when she
opens Monday in the main showroom of the
International Hotel for a special two-week engagement.
Joining Miss Franklin for her International
bow will be long-time Las Vegas comedy favorite.
Redd Foxx, the undisputed "King of the
Party Records". On the same bill will be the
Caravans, L.C. Cook and the Sweethearts of
Soul. The Joe Guercio Orchestra will provide
the musical backing.
While the diminutive Miss Franklin is normally
shy. she comes remarkably alive when she
is singing. Her openly emotional and fervent
style has endeared her to an ever-widening
following, whose own enthusiastic admiration is
just as open and fervent.
Miss Franklin's life was immersed in music
from early childhood when she sang in her
father's church choir. Such luminaries as
Mahalia Jackson. Clara Ward, Dinah Washington,
and Lou Rawls were regular guests at the Franklin
home. In fact her own singing style embodies
a wide range, from gospel to rhythm and
blues, clearly reflecting the influence of these
music world greats.
The Grammy and Golden Mike winning artist
was the subject of a recent television documentary
on ABC. In constant demand as a concert
artist. Aretha is also a favorite on numerous
television programs such as the Kraft Music
Hall and with such stars as Johnny Carson and
Merv Griffin.
Foxx has been a regular in the International s
big Casino Theatre and rates as one of the
hotel's most popular entertainers. The move
from the lounge into the 2,0000-seat showroom
should be a natural for the hilarious stand-up
comic whose "adults only" approach to humor
has earned him a universal following.
Aretha Franklin and Redd Foxx will appear
twice nightly at 8:00 p.m. and midnight through
June 14 with George Hamilton following.
has been summoned to H'wood for a screen test
. . .Willie Mays' daughter and Walt Frazier's
son are dating.
* * *
A TEEVEE COMMERCIAL FOR BLACK
PEOPLE—Gil Noble, the ABC - TV commentator
and his show, "Tell it Like It Is," have both
won Emmy awards for the joy each has brought
to the TV audience. As a result it is hard
for this scribe to understand h'cum this show
remains unsponsored. Is it because Gil happens
to be black and relates to the plight of the hued
man in America. But never mind all that since
I have a feeling, and would like to suggest
that black people sponsor this show. However
not to sell someprpduct, but to sgll OURSELVES.
If vou're like me, you're sick and tired of everybody
writing and tlaking about the blackman,
but nobody telling his story.
"Tell it Like it Is" could wipe-out this gross
oversight on a national basis if BLACK
PEOPLE we just buy this time. We could do
it as individuals, in groups, as members of an
organization or collective business owners, insurance
companies or banks. The layout of funds
would be so small we wouldn't have to even
deny ourselves that pack of cigarettes which
scientists say are killers anyway. I am going
to keep after you about this, but for now,
STAY LOOSE.
The Voice shall reserve
the right to
cancel any advertising
contract if our readers
arc not given fair
and honest consideration.
"We are pledged
t o e x p o s e a n d f u l l y
condemn" all unfair
business practices.
BRUCE'S
LIQUORS!
648-2717
C o n t i n o u s F r o m 1 2 N o o n
L a t e M i d n i t e S h o w s
F r i d a y & S a t u r d a y
THIS
SPORTING
HOUSE
2ND BIG HIT
jp-
N o O n e U n d e r 1 8 A d m i t t e d
Breakfast Anytime
2 Eggs (any style)
Choice Of
Ha m
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Sausage
and Toast
C A S I N O
DOWNTOWN
S. SALOON
3rd. and 06DEN
RADIO
KLAV 1230
O N Y O U R
D I A L
AUDREY TAYLOR S
AFTER MIDNITE SHOW
YOUR HOSTESS AND, SLEEPY
TIME GAL
Spinning Your Favorite Tunes
Write or Phone Your Request
T o T h e S t a t i o n O f T h e S t a r s • W e W e l c o m e
Y o u r C o m m e n t s O r Y o u r F a v o r i t e J o k e s
Fri.— Sot. — Sun.12 a.m. to5 a.m
LAS VEGAS VOICE Thursday. May 28, 1970
)000000000000000000€300000000g A LINE ON ~ 8
SPORTS By ELBURT MILLER
HE'S GONE FOR GOOD
The question lurking in the minds of many
people is "Who will replace the lost Wizard ?
Come next week, or early the following week,
the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, should
have a head basketball coach. By that time it
will be more than five weeks since Rolland Todd
announced his resignation at UNLV to become
coach of the Portland expansion franchise in the
National Basketball Association.
Since Rolland Todd is in the processes of
making his epic journey to Portland, Oregon,
1 feel it necessitates the answering of a few
questions you, the public, asked to know.
First of all, was Rolland Todd a good coach?
Todd has as much knowledge of the game of
basketball as anyone else in the country. He
implemented the run-and-shoot type of game into
his offense being fully aware that not only is
that the mask exciting part of the game, but
it would be most rewarding in recruiting those
touted California athletes who love this type of
play. The Black athlete is built around the runand-
shoot type of game—California has produced
some of the great ones— not being naive of this
fact Coach Todd went to work recruiting the
tremendous Black athletes who sprinkle throughout
the California area. With the idea and determination
of them helping him build a dynasty
at UNLV Coach Todd once replied "a good coach
is only judged on his won & lost record and
that's the only real criterion." By thatcriterion,
which isn't mind, he had to be a good coach
in that judgement.
Secondly, How was Coach Todd such a great
recruiter? I can remember backwhen Todd came
to San Diego in hopes of recruiting me to this
University. Todd had a basic philosophy of the
black athletes problem since he himself grew
up in an area where integration with all breeds
was a common entity. Todd learned many of the
hangups and disappointments, goals and desires
desires of the athletes who began their career
playing ball in the streets. Utilizing what he
had learned growing up, when he became head
coach here and began his recruiting program,
he immediately headed for the area he knew
produced some of the finest basketball players
in the country. He communicated with the black
athlete, not at an intellectual level, but at the
common level that the black athlete knew and
could appreciate. Subsequently, because of his
communication and relationship with the black
athlete it was a tremendous tool in recruiting
many of those highly sought after players,
who needed to be convinced which college or
university to attend.
From all measureable standpoints, Todd had
to be one of the better recruiting coaches on
the West Coast. Since this Wizard is gone, who
will replace him and how will the University
fare now? I don't know who will replace Coach
Todd, but the show will go on; maybe the University
will tell. Anyway you look at it; Progress
stops for no man? So keep the banners up.
DOOLITTLE CENTER Labor News Conference
To assure every boy, girl and adult a chance
to use the Doolittle Gym we find it very necessary
to schedule it accordingly:
Elementary Boys-Girls: Mon., Tues., Wed.,
& Fri., 3-5 p.m. Saturday, 9 a.m. - 12 noon.
Junior High Boys: Mon., Tues., Wed., Fri.,
5-7 p.m. Saturday, 12 noon - 3 p.m.
High School & Adults: Mon., Tues., Wed.,
Fri., 7-10 p.m.
Sundays — Elementary & Jr. Hi: 1-3 p.m.
High School & Adults: 3-6 p.m.
OPEN TO ANYONE: 6-8 p.m.
Girls & Ladies: Every Tues day night, 6 -
9 ^ Your cooperation in maintaining this schedule
will be greatly appreciated.
The schedule which went into effect April
6, 1970, IS IN EFFECT AS OF NOW.
Charles "Doc" Broadus, trainer of the 1968
Olympic Games heavyweight champion, George
Foreman, is presently a Recreation Leader at
Doolittle Center and the following is part of the
extensive program he has set up for the Center.
1. Boxing: 3-5 p.m., Monday through Friday,
open, junior & novice.
2. Weight lifting: 1 - 3 p.m., Monday, Wednesday
and Friday.
A. Junior division, ages 10-11
B. Intermediate division, 12-13
C. Senior division, 14-15
3. Judo: Boys & girls, Tues, and Thurs.
A. Light midget division, under 10 years of age.
B. Heavy midget division, under lOyears of age.
C. Light junior division, 11 to 12 years of age.
D. Heavy Junior division, 11 to 12 years old.
E. Light intermediate division, 13 to 14 years.
F. Heavy Intermediate division, 13 to 14 years.
G. Light senior division, 15 to 16 years of age.
H. Heavy senior division, 15 to 16 years of age.
4. Physical fitness: Boys, girls and adults,
9-10 a.m., Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday.
5. Volley ball: Boys, girls and adults, 10
a.m. to 12 noon, Monday, Tuesday and
Wednesday.
LEARN-TO-SWIM-CLASSES
Registration for Learn-to-swim classes began
Friday, May 1, 1970. Instructional classes
will be conducted in all seven City swimming
pools. Lessons will begin when school is out
for the Summer.
A $3.00 fee is charged for each class. The
course includes nine lessons.
Registration is held at the Las Vegas City
Recreation Department office in the City Hall
Annex building, corner of Stewart and Las Vegas
Boulevard North, week days between the
hours of 9 to 5.
For further information please call 385-
1221, Ext. 374/375/376.
'•COH.UCTI BAIL. BONO SWVICC ABOUND TMI CCOCK"
LYSLSS' A-AA BAIL BONUS
ANYWHERE - - - ANYTIME
IMMEDIATE
SERVICE
TERMS
AVAILABLE
Free Bail
Information Corner o f
3 8 4 - S 5 4 4 MAIN & BONANZA
Union members can and should take a leading
role in putting badly-needed programs—intended
to meet human needs—into operation at the
local level, AFL-CIO Community Services Director
Leo Perlis, declared today in a network
radio interview.
Perlis pointed out that union members "strive
hard to elect the right kind of candidates to
public office" and to help enact "legislation for
the benefit of the people." He said there is a
implementation of those programs in their own
communities. That, he noted, was the central aim
of the recent AFL-CIO National Conference on
Community Services, held in Washington, D.C.
"Perhaps the most crucial welfare problem
now facing most of the people in this country"
is the need for more adequate and readily available
medical care, he said. He said that local
union members will be helping to educate their
fellow citizens to the need for "real overhaul
of our medical delivery system."
Perlis said there is a broad and growing
public demand for a national health insurance
program. "We have tried for many years,
through voluntary health schemes, to meet the
needs of the people, but obviously, they are
not being met" he asserted. He added thatwhile
many voluntary health and medical plans are
"quite good on a voluntary basis. . .they are not
as comprehensive as they should be," and are
often out of reach for many people.
Perlis reported that some 500 delegates
from local and international unions, central labor
bodies and observers from various voluntary
agencies took part in the general sessions
and workshops at the four-day conference. He
said that most of the union delegates "work
full-time in the area of community service. . .
helping to meet the immediate and emergency
needs" of all citizens. He added that "thousands
upon thousands" of union members also work
as volunteers with various agencies in the
effort to "pull together for a better community.
Reporters questioning Perlis were Don Finley
labor correspondent for I 'nited Press International,
and Harry Conn, editor of Press
Associates. Incorporated. The AFL-CIO produced
public affairs program was broadcast
Tuesday at 9:35 p.m. (EDT), on the Mutual
Broadcasting System, and at 11:05 p.m. on
W AVA-FM in Washington, D.C.
The statistical supplement— the second section
of VA's two-part annual report on its activities
during the past fiscal year— is available
for 40 cents from the Superintendent of Documents,
Washington, D.C. 20402.
For FREE Copy of
" F A I T H F O R F R E E D O M '
C a l l
3 8 4 - 9 7 8 4 - 8 7 0 - 5 7 3 4 1
Open ? to 9 Stnu- - 10 to 9
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4 ROOMS $398
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ALLIED FURNITURE
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Tonight's the night to discover
the Smooth Canadian.
Seagram's V.O. Canadian.
Known by the company it keeps.
I MAY 1970
THI FRLENDLLEJF PI;" IN RO«N
CANADIAN WHISK*-* BUNO OF SELECTED WHISKIES. SIX YEARS OLD. 86.8 PROOF. SEAGRAM DISTILLERS CO.. H * C
NAVAL CHAPLAINS SCHOOL
NAVAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING CENTER
NEWPORT, RHODE ISLAND
GRADUATION
BASIC CLASS B85001
21 NOVEMBER 1984
COMMODORE JOHN R. McNAMARA
CHAPLAIN CORPS, U. S. NAVY
Commodore John R. McNamara, CHC, USN, serves as
Deputy Chief of Chaplains in the Office of the Chief of
Chaplains, Washington, D.C.
Chaplain McNamara was born k September 1927 in
Worcester, Massachusetts. After attending St.. John's
Seminary, Boston, he was ordained a priest for the Catholic
Archdiocese of Boston on 10 January 1952. He served 10
years as an assistant pastor and was commissioned a
chaplain in the United States Navy on 7 May 1962 and
immediately reported for active duty.
In 21 years of service, Chaplain McNamara has had a
wide variety of assignments, set forth as follows: Naval
Hospital Portsmouth, Virginia; Naval Air Station, Cubi Point,
the Philippines; 1st Marine Division, Camp Pendleton,
California; 3rd Marine Division, Vietnam; Naval Hospital,
Chelsea, Massachusetts; 2nd Marine Aircraft Wing, Cherry
Point, North Carolina; USS KITTY HAWK (CV- 63); post
graduate student, University of Pennsylvania; Naval 7\ir
Station, Brunswick, Maine; USS OKLAHOMA CITY (CG-5)
and 7th Fleet Chaplain, Yokosuka, Japan; Naval District,
Washington; Bureau of Naval Personnel/ Naval Military
Personnel Command, Washington; Marine Corps Base, Camp
Lejeune, North Carolina.
Personal decorations include the Bronze Star with Combat
V for service in Vietnam; the Meritorious Service Medal for
service as District Chaplain, Naval District, Washington;
Gold Star in lieu of a second Meritorious Service Medal for
service as Assignments Officer for the Chaplain Corps; Navy
Commendation Medal for performance of duty on board the
USS OKLAHOMA CITY (CG-5).
PROGRAM
ARRIVAL OF OFFICIAL PARTY
ENTRY OF GRADUATES
NATIONAL ANTHEM
Northeastern Navy Band
INVOCATION
WELCOMING REMARKS
Captain Peter S. Corr, Jr., USN
Commander, Naval Education and Training Center
SCRIPTURE READING
CLASS REFLECTIONS
Class B85001
PLURALISM AWARD
The Honorable Paul W. Crowley
State Representative
Member, Naval Affairs Committee
RECOGNITIONS
Captain Stan J. Beach, CHC, USN
Director, Naval Chaplains School
GRADUATION ADDRESS
Commodore John R. McNamara, CHC, USN
Deputy Chief of Chaplains
PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS
Commodore John R. McNamara, CHC, USN
HYMN
"The Navy Hymn"
BENEDICTION
DEPARTURE OF OFFICIAL PARTY
"ANCHORS AWEIGH"
Northeastern Navy Band
GRADUATES
LT3G PAUL G. AKERS, CHC, LSNR
First Force Service Support Groijp, FMFPAC
LT3G REGAN R. BEAUCHAMP, CHC, USNR
Naval Hospital, Bethesda
LTJG ROBERT L. CRALL, CHC, USNR
USS MILWAUKEE (AOR-2)
ENS CAREY P. ELAM, TSP, USNR-R
ENS OGDEN M. FORBES, TSP, USNR-R
LT JAMES D. GANTT, CHC, USNR
Second Marine Aircraft Wing, FMFLANT
LT JAMES A. GAY, CHC, USNR
First Marine Division, FMFPAC
LT GARY A. GRIEP, CHC, USNR
Naval Hospital, Bethesda
LTJG PHILLIP E. GWALTNEY, CHC, USNR
Second Marine Division, FMFLANT
LTJG THOMAS W. HARRINGTON Jr., CHC, USNR
Destroyer Squadron 23
LTJG PAUL S. HOGGARD, CHC, USNR
USS RANGER (CV-61)
LT THEES C. HOFT, CHC, USNR
Administrative Command, NTC, Great Lakes
LTJG CHRISTOPHER L. HUNT, CHC, USNR
Administrative Command, NTC, Orlando
LT BRIAN F. KELLY, CHC, USNR
Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island
LT FRANCOIS L. LACROIX, CHC, USNR-R
LTJG DAVID A. LEELAND, CHC, USNR
Marine Corps Recruit Depot, Parris Island
LTJG ROBERT W. MARSHALL, CHC, USNR
Naval Station, Keflavik, Iceland
LTJG TIMOTHY D. NALL, CHC, USNR
Administrative Command, NTC, Great Lakes
LTJG JOSEPH C. PAUL, CHC, USNR
Marine Aircraft Group 29
LT CARL F. PELTZ, CHC, USNR
Naval Station, Keflavik, Iceland
LTJG KARL F. PITTARD, CHC, USNR
Destroyer Squadron 10
LTJG JAMES R. ROBINSON, CHC, USNR
First Force Service Support Group, FMFPAC
LTJG STEVEN L. SMITH, CHC, USNR
USS VIRGINIA (CGN-38)
LT DONALD R. STEED, CHC, USNR
Naval Air Station, Agana, Guam
LTJG GEORGE E. TRACY, CHC, USNR
First Marine Aircraft Wing, FMFPAC
LTJG JERRY A. WADDELL, CHC, USNR
Marine Aircraft Group 31
LTJG GLEN D. WEST, CHC, USNR
Third Marine Aircraft Wing, FMFPAC
LTJG ROBERT N. WIANT Jr., CHC, USNR
USS FORRESTAL (CV-59)
LTJG GARY G. WILLIAMS, CHC, USNR
Second Marine Division, FMFLANT
LTJG JOHNNY M. WILSON Jr., CHC, USNR
Administrative Command, NTC, San Diego
THE NAVY HYMN
ETERNAL FATHER, STRONG TO SAVE,
WHOSE ARM HATH BOUND THE RESTLESS WAVE,
WHO BIDD'ST THE MIGHTY OCEAN DEEP
ITS OWN APPOINTED LIMITS KEEP;
O HEAR US WHEN WE CRY TO THEE
FOR THOSE IN PERIL ON THE SEA.
ETERNAL FATHER, GRANT WE PRAY
TO ALL MARINES BOTH NIGHT AND DAY,
THE COURAGE, HONOR, STRENGTH AND SKILL
THEIR LAND TO SERVE, THY LAW FULFILL
BE THOU THE SHIELD FOREVERMORE
FROM EVERY PERIL TO THE CORPS.
ETERNAL FATHER, LORD OF HOSTS
WATCH OVER THOSE WHO GUARD OUR COASTS
PROTECT THEM FROM THE RAGING SEA
AND GIVE THEM LIGHT AND LIFE AND PEACE
GRANT THEM FROM THY GREAT THRONE ABOVE
THE SHIELD AND SHELTER OF THY LOVE.
BASIC COURSE MISSION
TO ASSIST NEWLY-APPOINTED NAVY
CHAPLAIN CORPS OFFICERS TO EMPLOY
THEIR PROFESSIONAL SKILLS AS CLERGY
WITHIN THE PLURALISTIC CONTEXT OF
THE MILITARY SEA SERVICES.
TO INDOCTRINATE NEWLY-APPOINTED NAVY
CHAPLAIN CORPS OFFICERS INTO THE
MILITARY ORGANIZATION AND TO
FAMILIARIZE THEM WITH THE POLICIES
AND PRACTICES OF THE NAVAL SERVICES.
NAVAL CHAPLAINS SCHOOL STAFF
CAPT S. J. BEACH, CHC, USN DIRECTOR
CDR G. E. DOBES, CHC, USN BASIC COURSE OFFICER
INSTRUCTORS
CDR F. A. ROTHERMEL, CHC, USN
CDR T. J. BENEDUM, CHC, USN
CDR W. H. GIBSON, CHC, USN
LCDR G. A. LANGHORNE, CHC, USN
LCDR M. R. FERGUSON, CHC, USN
LCDR G. V. LYONS, CHC, USN
GYSGT W. G. CRAWFORD, USMC

NEVADA
NUCLEAR WASTE
STORAGE INVESTIGATIONS
NOVEMBER 1980
UNITED STATES
DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY
NEVADA OPERATIONS OFFICE
LAS VEGAS, NEVADA
NEVADA NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE INVESTIGATIONS
INTRODUCTION
The U.S. Nuclear Waste Management Program is the responsibility of the
U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Nuclear Waste Management. The DOE
is developing or improving the technology for safely and permanently isolating
nuclear wastes from the biosphere. Regional repository sites are needed to
accommodate the growing quantities of highly radioactive nuclear wastes being
accumulated at commercial nuclear reactor sites across the United States.
Regardless of what the future holds for the nuclear power industry, the substantial
accumulations of radioactive wastes that already exist need to be permanently
disposed of in repositories designed especially for that purpose. The
protection of the public health and safety of both current and future generations
is the prime consideration in the selection of repository sites and the
disposal technology employed.
Several methods have been proposed to permanently isolate highly radioactive
nuclear wastes from the biosphere. At the request of the President, an
Interagency Review Group (IRG) on Nuclear Waste Management was established to
examine the proposed disposal methods and to subject its views to public
review and comment. After carefully considering the many comments received, a
final report was prepared which summarized the comments and presented the
IRG's conclusions and recommendations to the President. The proposed methods
examined by the IRG and exposed to public review include storage in mined
underground repositories, disposal in mined cavities in a manner that leads to
rock melting, placement in deep ocean sediments, insertion into very deep
drill holes, and ejection into space.
In its report to the President, the IRG recommended that the first disposal
facilities be mined repositories. Mined repositories can easily be inspected
and monitored—even waste retrieval is possible if that should become advisable.
The IRG also recommended that the approach to permanent disposal of nuclear
1
waste should be to proceed systematically in a technically conservative
manner. Scientific data are needed to provide the site-specific and regional
information required for sound decision-making concerning the ultimate disposal
of highly radioactive wastes.
The present emphasis in the U.S. Nuclear Waste Management Program is to
evaluate the suitability of potential repository sites. Consequently, several
areas of the United States have been selected for study and experimental
investigations. Once these areas have been thoroughly evaluated, the information
obtained will indicate whether any of these sites are acceptable. If
none of the initial study areas are determined to be suitable for a repository,
alternative locations and rock masses will be selected for study. This document
describes the Nevada portion of the U.S. Nuclear Waste Management Program.
Experiments in mined underground facilities are being conducted to determine
the suitability of potential host-rock media and to test the effectiveness of
engineered containment systems.
2
WHY IS SOUTHERN NEVADA BEING CONSIDERED?
Southern Nevada is one of the areas of the United States that is being
considered for a possible repository site. The scarcity of groundwater and
the existence of potentially suitable rock masses were the primary considerations
for selecting arid southern Nevada. In addition, southern Nevada has a
proven capability and site for conducting underground experimental investigations
and a unique facility for working with intensely radioactive materials.
The groundwater conditions around and in the vicinity of a nuclear waste
repository are important from a long-term safety standpoint. Since some
radioactive substances might eventually escape an engineered containment
system and migrate with groundwater, it is important to reduce this possibility
to a minimum. Therefore, the less groundwater there is in the area of a
repository and the slower it moves, the greater is the long-term safety
factor. In southern Nevada, most of the existing groundwater migrates slowly
and lies deep below the surface. Furthermore, most of the groundwater flow
paths lead to hydrologically closed desert basins.
The nature and extent of underground rock masses are also important from
a long-term safety standpoint. A desirable host-rock mass for a nuclear waste
repository would serve as a natural barrier against nuclear waste migration to
back up the engineered containment system. Consequently, the ability of the
host rock to prevent or retard the migration of radionuclides is a prime site
selection consideration.
The NTS is the primary location of interest in southern Nevada. Withdrawn
federal lands bordering the NTS are also being considered. There are several
reasons for focusing attention on the NTS area in addition to its favorable
groundwater conditions, potentially suitable rock masses, and unique experimental
capabilities. For instance, the NTS is vast in size, is remote from
populated areas, and all surrounding lands are federally owned. A dedicated
radiological safety management program already exists at the NTS. This program
is supplemented by ecological studies of the NTS and an environmental surveillance
program outside the boundaries of the NTS which are being carried out by
3
outside organizations and another federal agency. Finally, the appropriate
support facilities and equipment and a qualified work force are available
help conduct experiments on or near the NTS.
NEVADA
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The primary area of interest in southern Nevada is the Nevada Test Site.
4
WHAT ARE THE NEVADA NUCLEAR WASTE STORAGE INVESTIGATIONS?
The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations (NNWSI) consist of a
variety of studies and evaluations in support of the U.S. Nuclear Waste Management
Urogram. These investigations are being coordinated by the Nevada Operations
Office of the DOE. The NNWSI were formally organized in 1977 and are
primarily oriented towards developing or improving the technology of nuclear
waste storage and disposal and determining whether selected underground rock
media on or adjoining the NTS are technically acceptable for a licensed,
permanent, high-level nuclear waste repository. The major investigations
currently in progress are briefly described in the following sections.
REGIONAL AND SITE-SPECIFIC INVESTIGATIONS
Two of the primary issues addressed by the NNWSI are concerned with (1)
whether a nuclear waste repository would be compatible with the prime NTS
mission, nuclear weapons testing, and (2) whether an acceptable disposal
medium exists within a suitable geohydrologic setting on or adjacent to the
NTS. The southwest portion of the NTS has been designated by the nuclear
weapons community as an area where a repository could be located without
interfering with weapons testing activities. The seismic data already acquired
by NNWSI participants indicate that the southwest portion of the NTS is sufficiently
remote from nuclear weapons testing to make the siting of an underground
repository in that area feasible. Current efforts in the southwest NTS area
include a variety of hydrologic, geologic, geophysical, and host-rock investigations
.
A comprehensive regional hydrologic model is being developed by NNWSI
participants for the NTS area. This model will take into account paleohydrologic
or "groundwater history" data which are being gathered and studied to define
groundwater conditions for the NTS region that existed during Quaternary
glacial and interglacial climatic regimes. Knowledge of past and present
groundwater activity is the most reliable basis on which to predict future
groundwater behavior. The regional hydrologic model will be used to characterize
groundwater systems and to predict groundwater migration rates, flow paths,
and radionuclide dilution and sorption in geologic media.
5
The regional geologic and geophysical investigations performed by NNWSI
participants are revealing the present geologic nature and geologic history of
the NTS area. The data from these investigations will be correlated with
those from the regional hydrologic investigations to provide the geohydrologic
-informal-inn needed for sound decision-making in regard to the technical acceptability
of siting a permanent repository at a specific location within the NTS
region.
Studies of regional tectonics, seismicity, and volcanism are part of the
NNWSI. These studies are being conducted to assess the potential for faulting,
damaging earthquakes, accelerated erosion, and volcanic activity to occur and
to assess the effects of these phenomena on repository performance. In
addition, the ground motion induced by nuclear weapons tests is being measured
both at the surface and underground to determine repository design requirements.
Exploratory drilling provides current and historical data about the subsurface
environment.
6
The NNWSI are evaluating specific host-rock masses to determine their
acceptability as storage media for highly radioactive solid wastes, whether a
rock mass is acceptable or not depends primarily on its physical, chemical,
and mechanical properties. These Drnnpi-Umo u •
• « w. t i_ properties are being determined and evaluated
in both laboratory and field studies THo f-t i j
studies. The field studies include the establishmeat
of test facilities within selected rock masses to measure the geohydrologic
geochemical, and physicomechanical response of these rock masses to test
conditions. The resulting data are being used to develop models for predicting
how well a repository would perform its mission over its intended life-span.
SPENT FUEL HANDLING AND ENCAPSULATION
One of the facilities that makes the NTS a national resource is the
E-MAD facility; E-MAD stands for Engine Maintenance, Assembly, and Disassembly.
is facility was originally designed for working with highly radioactive
experimental nuclear engines for rockets. The building has also been used for
e fabrication and assembly of massive railroad cars used as reactor test
beds as well as the assembly and disassembly of prototype gas-cooled reactors
01 advanced design.
The E-MAD facility is presently being used to develop, evaluate, and
improve the technology of handling and encapsulating spent fuel assemblies,
ith some modifications, the building and machinery designed for working
remotely with experimental reactors were adapted to work with spent reactor
can sa™ rperrtal storase canisters f°r c°ntaini°s "• <"«««.
spent f I T lnSPaCt' °anlPUlate> a"d «"aP=olate the highly radioactive
« fuel assemblies from outside the huge hot bay. Thick leaded glass
::::~and; 20~chamei ci°sed-^^ sa£e
Visual observation of hot bay operations.
The spent fuel assemblies used for evaluating high-level nuclear waste
n ing and encapsulation technology, and for performing the storage tests
de-cnbed in the next two sections, were transported to the NTS by licensed
commercial carriers in heavy steel shipping casks which were desired and ested
t. withstand head-on collision with a locomotive going So miles per hour IT
7
A sophisticated radioactive materials handling facility is located at the
Nevada Test Site.
A special shielded vehicle is used to transport and insert highly radioactive
canisters containing spent reactor fuel into experimental dry wells.
8
only superficial damage. Upon arrival at the E-MAD facility, each spent fuel
assembly was removed from its shipping cask, inspected, and inserted into
an experimental stainless steel storage canister. After the canister closure
lid was threaded in place and welded shut, each canister was leak-tested to
ensure perfect containment. The experimental canisters and their temporary
storage environs are equipped with instruments which are providing scientists
with information needed to evaluate and advance the technology for storing
spent reactor fuel.
SURFACE AND NEAR-SURFACE TESTS
Temporary surface and near-surface storage methods for spent reactor fuel
are being evaluated at the NTS neat to the E-MAD facility. Temporary storage
methods may be used to cool do™ heat-generating radioactive materials prior
to final disposal or to provide overflow storage capacity for spent reactor
fuel from commercial nuclear power plants. The following surface and nearsurface
tests are currently in progress and are expected to continue for
several years.
The first method of temporary storage being tested involves storing a
P L canister in an aboveground, sealed concrete storage silo which is
designed to virtually eliminate external radiation and to withstand earthquake
tipover without significant damage. This silo i, extensively reinforced with
steel rebar; it stands 21 feet high, is 9 feet in diameter, weighs about 95
tons, and sets on a reinforced concrete pad that is 14 feet square and 6 feet
t ick. The silo is instrumented to measure various container properties and
temperatures. An 18-inch-diameter opening in the center of the silo is designed
o .old a canister containing a spent fuel assembly and a shield plug.
The second method of temporary storage being tested involves storing
spent fuel canisters in near-surface dry wells. The 25-foot-deep dry wells
are spaced 20 feet apart in the center of railroad tracks built especially for
this purpose. The holes are 28 inches in diameter and are equipped with
18-inch-diameter steel liners which are cemented in place. The encapsulated
uel assemblies are transported to and emplaced in the dry wells using a
9
shielded railcar-mounted vehicle formerly used in the nuclear rocket development
program; the vehicle was modified to handle the canisters. The wells are
instrumented to collect and record canister and liner temperatures, soil
temperatures near the wells, and radioactivity levels.
UNDERGROUND TEST
The NNWSI are currently conducting a test of the feasibility of storing
spent reactor fuel in an underground crystalline rock formation. This formation
is generically representative of crystalline rock formations which exist in
many areas of the United States. The test is known as the Spent Fuel Test-
Climax and is being conducted 1,400 feet below the surface of the NTS in a
unique test facility that was constructed in a granitic host-rock formation.
Granite is a common crystalline rock.
A newly mined underground facility was developed for the Spent Fuel
Test—Climax next to existing facilities at the NTS which were previously
constructed for underground nuclear weapons effects studies. The existing
facilities provided access to a large granitic rock formation within the depth
range being considered for ultimate geologic disposal of high—level nuclear
wastes.
The test facility consists of three parallel drifts that are joined on
each end. The central canister storage drift contains the surface access hole
through which the canisters were lowered into the test facility. This drift
has 17 steel-cased storage holes: 11 contain spent fuel canisters and 6
contain electrically heated canisters that match the spent fuel canisters in
thermal characteristics. This mixed arrangement feature of the test is being
used to determine if radiation causes any significant synergistic effects
which might adversely affect the ability of the host rock to contain the
nuclear waste. The two outer drifts each contain ten electric heaters which
are being used to produce a thermal environment within the rock surrounding
the canister storage drift that simulates the center of a large repository.
This feature of the test is being used to provide data on how an underground
crystalline rock formation responds to the heat loads which may be encountered
in an actual high-level nuclear waste repository.
10
This is where the Spent Fuel Test-Climax is being conducted to evaluate the
ffftCbeW aPorinS sPent reactor fuel in a crystalline rock formation 1,400
feet below the surface of the Nevada Test Site.
The Underground Transfer Vehicle pictured above was used to receive each snentin6^^
18^61 Wfred lnto the underground test facility, move it laterally
™\*ha "u •' wempmlac ea lxst o ibne a usste°dr atgoe rehmoolvee, tahned cplaung Lth—e hole. dThiXs rSail -
11
The results of this test will be used to determine whether crystalline
rocks are technically acceptable as host-rock media for permanent nuclear
waste repositories and to develop models for calculating repository mine
design requirements. The NNWSI are also conducting the test to demonstrate
the technologic capability to safely transport and emplace highly radioactive
spent fuel canisters into a deep underground storage environment. This
includes the capability to continuously monitor and safely retrieve the
canisters at any time during the test.
The Spent Fuel Test—Climax was begun in April 1980 and is expected to
continue for several years. During the test, the host rock and experimental
canisters are being subjected to intensely radioactive, heat-producing nuclear
waste and electrically induced thermal fields. Heat production will initially
cause the rock and canister temperatures to rise slowly to a maximum level.
The rock and canister temperatures will then gradually decline as the radioactive
elements disintegrate. Disintegration will also cause the radiation to
gradually decrease in intensity throughout the test. The nuclear radiation
originating from within the spent fuel canisters is being absorbed within a
short distance by the rock immediately around the concrete-plugged, 24-inchdiameter
storage holes which were drilled 20 feet into the granite floor of
the central drift. A sophisticated data acquisition system is being used for
monitoring and recording the measurement data acquired from the heavily
instrumented test facility and its environs.
After the test is concluded, the spent fuel canisters will be retrieved
and returned to the E-MAD facility for post-test evaluation, temporary storage,
and disposition. The underground test facility will also undergo an extensive
post-test evaluation to supplement the nondestructive operational test data.
The test results will be documented and made available for public examination.
12
The Nevada Nuclear Waste Storage Investigations are being managed by the
U.S. Department of Energy, Nevada Operations Office, which is located in
Las Vegas, Nevada.
Technical reports on the nuclear waste management investigations and
experiments being conducted in Nevada are available in special open files at
the Nevada State Library in Carson City; the Washoe County Library and the
University of Nevada, Reno (UNR) Library in Reno; the Tonopah Public Library
m Tonopah; and the Clark County Library in Las Vegas. These reports are also
on display in the Public Document Room of the Department of Energy, Nevada
Operations Office, in Las Vegas. Further information about the Nevada Nuclear
Waste Storage Investigations may be obtained from the following office:
Director
Office of Public Affairs
U.S. Department of Energy
Nevada Operations Office
2753 South Highland Drive
P.O. Box 14100
Las Vegas, NV 89114
(702) 734-3521
13
This item has not been digitized in its entirety. The original item is
available for research and handling a t the UNLV University Libraries.
Additional digitization is available upon request. Please contact
Special Collections to request additional digitization or with any
questions regarding access a t special.collectionsPunlv.edu.
This item has not been digitized in its entirety. The original item is
available for research and handling at the UNLV University Libraries
Additional digitization is available upon request. Please contact
Special Collections to request additional digitization or with any
questions regarding access at SDecial.collectionsPunlv.edu.
M¥S C
Dr. Chaim Weizmann, David Ben-Gurion Levi Eshkol Zalman . Shazar Golda Meir Moshe Dayan Menahem Begin
LEBANON
Kiryat Shmonah
iKuneitra
Degania
MEDITERRANEAN SEA
HerzTfa
Rehovot • Amman
Jerusalem,
JUDEA
Hebron' DEAD SEA
• Beersheba
# Revivim
• Sdeh Boker
NEGEV
SINAI JORDAN
SAUDI ARABIA
by Ernest Calloway Territories administered
by Israel after Six Day
war
EGYPT 1949 armistice lines
:Sharm el-Sheikh
This item has not been digitized in its entirety. The original item is
available for research and handling at the UNLV University Libraries.
Additional digitization is available upon request. Please contact
Special Collections to request additional digitization or with any
questions regarding access at special.collections@unlv.edu.
SHALOM — the first
word newcomers learn and
the one most used in
Israel
FROM AN ISRAELI NOTE-BOOK
By Ernest Calloway
A series of articles based upon a three-week visit to Israel
in the summer of 1966 with five other U.S. trade unionists.
Table Of Contents
Israel - An Ancient Land °f Creative Promise 2
Kibbutzim: The Soul And Moral Fibre Of A Nation 5
Histadrut: An Exercise In Nation-building Unionism 8
Structure,Program And Thrust Of Israeli Unionism 11
Mier Batz- Desert Engineer And His Dream 13
Masada - An Epic Og Magnificent Courage XU
An Open Letter To A. Brave Israeli Family 17
Israeli Letter, When Win These Things End 18
Introducing Hypocrisv In The Mid-eat Crisis 20
Journey Erom Haifa 21
Death Of An Israeli Eriend 22
INFORMAL ASSISTANCE
GIVING DURING THIS QUARTER
TYPE OF ASSISTANCE LAS VEGAS RENO TOTAL
WALK-IN
Referred elsewhere 11
Suggested file complaint 14
TELEPHONE
Referred elsewhere 225
Suggested file complaint 138
TOTAL ~ - 38g
4
5
98
34
141
15
19
323
172
529
»
MAB
3/14/78
-10-
H. R. Shire,
" HRjj? e c tor.
to '" x^Plt. Protection
' V^gaS
~Th
TGIY.AB.S. BRIBA-H, JULY 17, 1942. Bo.l
ARE ^ J A-A M_ !
PLANT PROT \ N G/
A.
HEAD 013 G0LLISIC13
013 FALLQH R0A3 A TAK<2 A FIRE HAZABD
Two cars were seriously
damaged in a head on colli**
sion Monday evening on the .
Gallon Road twenty-five
miles from Camp. All occupants
of the cars escaped
personal injury.
The road was only eigh* • *
teen feet wide at the point
of impact and visibility
was at a minimum,
Charles. Flanders of B,M.
I, was the driver of the
northbound car. He had
converted the 3,M,J?"Chevrolet
Sedan #122 into an
improvised ambulance to
transport Frank H. Wise and
son, Robert G. Wise, of
MacDonald Engineering Co,
to St. Marys Hospital in
Reno, lie. Wise was suffering
from a severe kidney
condition.
The driver of the souths
hound car was, Philip Byrnes
of Silver State Construct.. •
tion .Co. . He, was driving a
Chevrolet coupe ox uncertain
vintage^ license #22-65&
With Mr. Byrnes were two
unidentified passengers.
The automobiles were unable
to continue unde-r
their own power. Mr. Flanders
caught a ride back to
Camp with James Mclaughlin
of Macdoraids, obtained another
car and returned to
the scene of the wreck.
Captain Simmons would '
like, to call the attention f
of the Camp.to the serious
fire hazard created by
smoking in the'Big lent'
either at d&nces or at'
shows.
He o,uo t e s „ Chi ef Eat fi el d
Many of us have fathers,
sons and friends in our'
countxy8 s armed forces. Most?
Iof us are waiting our turn
to be, called to the colors.
Meanwhile, all of us i:Cn the
Hill" are .putting in our tv;
licks to lick the Asas.
It is. an ..inspiration to
every man-jack of us to know
fire xp revention engineer of ta hat we are doi1 ~n gT Jtrp,. ur rrpu>a4? rt
P.M.I, who says,"The Big
lent presents a fire hazard
of the first magnitude.11
It is the combined' opinion
of every man who- has
a knowledge of fire fighting
who has seen the Big
leaf, that;if it should'
catch on fire with a'crowd
i'n side ( some one would
lose"-hub life before the
tent coulcl be cleared.
•Captain Simmons appeals
to, every one of us to;protect
our'life and our
friend8 s lives by refrain- i?ve:
smoking when in
Without our i°A V ictory,
in our country's War Effort,
And it is no small part,
Ibis job we cue doing, this
plant we are. building, is a
vital necessity to the men
in. the firing line. Tracerbullets
for machine guns; in-
|aendiary bombs, leafs and
pencils; flares to spotlight
itargets; airplane fuselages,
jwings, props, wheels did engines
are dependent upon magnesium
for their very existence.
So, regardless of
what our job is, each and
y one ox us .serves as an
.important cog in the wheel V1
the Biw :ent 7e all are
cooperation, he is helple^.|kxng,our blows fob Liberty*
to protect us from being
burned to.death by fire, he
says.
Are you driving to town
without full load? Perhaps
someona: would like to !
go with- you and share expenses.
The next time you plan a
trip please call the Macdonald
Personnel' Office and
fill up your car,
Let the desert sun pour
down., let the sand and rocks
blister our fee-t and burn our
eyes, let the dust blind .and
:choke us. We can take all
this wilderness has to give
jond come' back for more. This
is War and we know i•§ We
ire living on the skeleton
nibs of this• Nevada desert,
doing a job, fighting a fight
for the land we love.
f
Paffiug. ans*rp*** *snmv>
Toiyabe y.r.easure
'{•: HELP KEEP AMERICA FREE f;
America is at War arid War needs mon-j
ey I Whatever else you are doing, .it is
not enough unless you-are a '..so buyxngAur
Bonds to the limit of your ability- For
your country's sake, ana your sake, invest
as soon as you can and as ma.on as
you can. Lend your dollars to the cause
Help America'Win the War 1 Order through
your local Bank or Post Office.
B. M. I. NEWS
.Fridny , July 17, 19 H-2
i
-MARGIE McCREA—secretary to Jim 1 Jells, is
I going to leave us soon. Hie climate
I doesn't agree with her.
!WIFr?RlD TRIlDE—Warohousa--vl_ll • be back
"scon after an illness that has kept
hop away too long. .
J WliEN THE WAITRESSES' moved all cause for
I the usual battle between the femail.
| type bangers and has slingers was
removed.
While you hre patriotically helping j
to pay for the war materials urgently
needed in this national crisis, you wilx
be saving,for your own_future. Your money
will be safe,, both as to principal and
interest. It will-be growing. It will be
available if you need it. And, if you _
leave it with your Government until mat- .
urity, it will come back to you as a welcome
reserve for peacetime necessities.
Invest for Victory I Do it Today!
We- call ourselves "Toiyabe Treasure"
for obvious reasons.
We will appear every Friday as long
as you want us. We are your paper. ye
offer you our humble services free of
charge and free of spirit. We are edited
ard published by Macdonald Engineering Oo.
but we want to speak for evexy man and
woman "On the Hill". Regardless of who
you are representing, if you are living
and working in Camp, you are our public.
Let us serve you and entertain you in every
"way we can.
Write to us or drop in to the MacDcnald
Personnel Office and talk to us ac
any time. We Want to know what is cn
vcur mind; particularly, what YOU would do
to make life in Gabbs Valley more worth
living.
THE ELECTRIC I AYS'seem to -have at last -come
into their own —' with pichicing,
• dancing, etc. They, have shown the
cj rls they are no1 "Jacks' Dull Boj".
|LOVINO~DAY ACAIIT — on.ee more the popr _
follows'in. Burikhouse' #2 were on their
w -. way out". Not once,'now twice, but at
least tare3. times have the men had to
yield their places of living to the
weaker sex -- When it takes longer
for the® to move than>the woman, -that'l
news I
WHAT PERT NOSED little lady was out
listening to an • imptpmptu soranade by
one of our esteemed hcsrnb lowers?
THAT DARK YOUNG Macdonald man is found
more often leaning on the desk of a
charming young B.- M. I. girl than cn
h i s o w n ? . . .
If anyone has'any interesting itemsto
report about their week-end excur-ioru
or would like to see tneir fxiends ..lame
in print, please bring or send such information
to Macdonald personnel Office,
fo Toiyabe Treasure.
Keep it clean, but let, it be interesting,
Please! You don't have to shoot
a cop or jump off the Golden Gate Bridge
to break print. On the otner hand, sleeping
the clock around is not exactly the
type of activity that makes for interesting
reading.
PEARL HARBOR VISITOR HERE
Arthur F. W. Garlson and Miss Doris
Trower, his fiancee, were guests of
t'-lr. and Mrs. Real Goulet last Friday and
(Saturday, July tenth and eleventh.
Mr. Carlson is on the Mainland on
sixty day leave from Pearl Harbor, Oahu,
Hawaii, whore he is construction Superintendent
for the Pacific Bridge Corporation
in charge of naval construction_
work.
The regular Friday night dance at
the Big Tent- was included in their visit
to Gabbs Valley
" Mr. M. A. Brown, im.pressa.ric of the
Big Tent, is presenting Botte Davis,
Ann Sheridan and Monty Woolley in
"The Man Who Came to Dinner" this Saturday
and Su&da-y.
The brilliant product of Georgo S.
Kaufman and Moss Hart's pen is directed
by William Keighley.
: . Carlos Brown, ox the
TirJxeeping SJepbxtr.or.t-, and J
Miss Mary Eorhhurger , of |
Reno, were marri'ed- Sunday1 jj
at" Winnemaeca--and .are now jj
spending a week honeymoon- |
ing at Lake Tanos. J-
. !
Johnny Prihgla, Head-'Sims- |
and well-known Nevadan, -hasj
been ill for.- several days
with a back'ailment* ••'His
condition is improving.-but
he still can "hardly walk*
Uncle Jim Mohme '.vent to ;.
.Reno Wednesday aft'errfooa to
receivd treatment for an
bid knee injury.
Who endowed the twi , -- -. • Use of' o-iir" Field Office
nun&ud soy.-,hes for, cattingjgirls. was' pufsfxbd'-M.riri'd wjj
SeGnnvl^?TJ%"a : i l"J ^sued.--..-by;tvvo j'.iac-d'0n«.I
^-lectins rust, in ]ald: men driving/bh'ck frorman
icdonalds V,ar ehous a?
Jo lawnmcwers?
•'*]% r-s f afternoon of swimming ifear If J
- ••• IN. utff
jMina, Tho boys got;'a bit
I'oanbunctuoua. and .nipped' the
t c
Z eke- Stanton has- finally
"broken"* He has
' gone to the-Northern
; palifornian mountains for
a rest and lots, of fishing {
— -he. says.* • ,
jrsar end of the'.yoUiig .iddy
CV< 'n-rv ky , aid then'pad the colicsbl
nerve to try '.and date : her
ppr heedless to say, .'they
pore "'bQi-aoho'u. She related
her har row in g . e:;p or i en ces to
f i" boss a-ni he . cracked ' back
j- .uoaff • s th.e- IfecdoriaXd cipp—
jroachi1.'.
Miss May''Boulter. of
Plant Protection went to
Prom''the• meagre reports V •
f:>hat hayp : drifted..in since
bni £ht,;ve.. can, ... by put—
, -, Timekeeper .Jack Peterj
son and Warehouse office
girl Bemi'ce'Clark soaked'
_ — -- in the s-alutory waters .of .,, . , -.
x.eno. ,,edn.es.day afternoon to Soia fringe' last Tuesday f'^S. bwoand two' together, con
glasses repaxred,. .!-afternoon .and discovered ' a fairly conpreher-
- j, other interests in common • |Jivxe picture, of t.He house
thp' parning party at the Vtaff
have her &
(its -news to us that she
wears- glhs'ses. But,- never
•question a young lady; s:
word, ;is' our-..motto.),
I besides. - swimming. The'
|»9 ©. sx-al l hours of tRfj iesf
.Uv morning' fpind' them;'
j.-still .goipg hUong. •'
Rtro rxse
Our Mr. Te;i Brinhworth.
was "launched1- host
•succ-'-ssfully, v. Qhaxpagne
pl.t
s.
^ wnspicucus by its at->
... was water» But
•n r , • ' j i ohnnie .xWalker... B-Xa 'k
Dome Rumor has it that-' xu.aJT eT»T„ ' » -a t
«— <m ecu ly appearance and
last 0.0g
1 . Bunor Iks a»t- Ilir-aB «rl*
'SiU 0oeS ha tetr! rr.v [-1 tflu! fff"1
p,K.,te s,-.t ID on.a polar i n or ^
.. gcae.unt i l? n ?? then no ? fl'rC.'iR Kon'p Vviok c-pp-n ' I ° '
Lxuxing"with'"one" fair rial;
and. back with three
Fracas some 'Week"' aoornj
i i: : i : . V 'J v o c c c
The "ihvs'tery of thc>
Miss'"" Win If.fed Trudy is t-ion from the by-;.
, .Miss Dorothy Smith erteroeleSrated-
Ms first f "kdkb'" "'S ' •'5eSi"y
h'-u'-^ -'-'^ 'tantalxaxag menu
in St. Marys. Roswital,..Renpr!:slipping his gif-I a':Miok&" j
recovering from an O'obratdo'H !
of early , this w.eek6 ;Sixe
-e-vecU '• c-b..cn sandwiches.
1 Flax-.h.- And then flatly
doing hioely. a.nd would enjoy
'hearing, fro® her..; "
friends* j
denied the next. • mbrnin e>'. - . e r i a- fisier reported for
[us shifts the - other mor"d-
[f the rigfer'
|.hackc. it.-had been moved
during the night*
Page rabe Treasure
FIRE IN TENT CITY F:
Mr -
' M i 1 J Q V
CAE HITS DITCH
ON LUNINC ROAD
A serious fire was averted.
Tuedday night by the j Mr, arte Mrs- Donald
prompt action of the Tent Miller an f Erred min
City Gaurd. . yj... re;: lata 'Baa.ur.lrv ni^t
Shortly after coming on., yhu mo;r car fDl'l 1j
duty, Thomas Warren, grave- Inoscl-'ate a cu-ve abort fur
yard shift Suard at Tent 30lltl) of Comp on .,he '
City, noticed smoke coming .'mninc Road
from a tent two doers from-' ^ Miilor car, a 1937
e guard4" sA ta4- tio4-n ..1..4 4-Wt, hlae4n rs he !j por(3 coupe license #' 3* 3" --1-56
Friday. July 17. iq*te M
reached the tent with.his
fire-extinguisher, flames
were shooting out of the
rear wall and top of the
tent. He extinguished the .
fire in less than a minute.
jplunged through a road oar£
| cade and cams to ..'est in a
ditch, four foot deep and
the length of the car, ten
yards up tho road.
Mr Miller works for B.M.
1W LATE TO CLASSIFY
Denizens of.Trailer City
were pleasantly. Surprised
one' day thisl-Week to' find a
eoaiung of oil had been applied
to the .surfabe of the
New Highway1 between Sierra
Magnusi t e. and; .Tra.i ler. City,
Is this a sign of.things tc
come? Might the Luning Road
receive a baptism of oil in
the near future? At least we
pan hope.
ITJf* ih e •h» adm b•» een lA ess aAl ertt mj.4-a.ux •"W1AO iUJ. UfclVie^ hr.d np™i•)-.+ nr, a> and had permitted, the f ire T ' °? t l le sang under
to gain more headway, the
entire tent would have been
in flames in another minute
and would have endangered
all of Tent City.
The fire..was surmised, to
have been caused by a cigarette.
Macdonald Housing Administrator,
Raymond C. Knoen,
reports that the Chief Bull
Cook and his crew in Tent
City are doing a. first class
job. Kneen states that the
bath houses and showers in
Tent City provide a mark
for the other Bull Cooks to
shoot at.
"The crew is doing a nic
job -with what they have to
work with," says Kneen,
"and are very accomodating
and courteous."
Jim Lewis. He lives in
Tonopah and was returning
from a day spent in moving
houshold goods to the families
iiewhome in MIna. Mr.
Miller suffered minor bruise
andshock. •-
Mrs. Miller was treated
by Dr. Chandy for shock and
received three stitches in
a cut over her left eye.
• -New recruits to camp are
being escorted to the Field
Office by Macdonald's Truck
Dispatcher, Bernhardt Gerhardt-
Heideman, sometimes
known as "Chicago".,
When his prucks are tied
up, "Chicago" conducts -a ;
personal tour al°hg Burma
Road in his own ear'. •.
What a treat!
PUBLISHED BY MACDONALD ENGINEERING COMPANY
LEGION MEETING
Report form Tuesday night
July lk) Toiyabe Post Legion
meeting: First Ccmmandr
Simons did not show up;
Second Commander Powers was
late; Painter Adkins was
fined .$5.00.
Toiyabe Post meets every
two weeks in the Big Tent.
Next meeting: July. 2$.
Cel. White Commander
Have anything to sell,
rent or swap?
Call the Editor of the
Toiyabe Treasure at. Macdonald's
Personnel Office
and we will run and add for
you free of charge.
The very attractive
brunette addition to the Fiel
Field Office, was .required to
work late (11pm) her. first
day on the job. What goes
011? Wonder if Tex has; taken
a, good look at the size of
iher husband?
"Helen of Troy'.' has .become
"Helen and.Troy". Miss reeves
'of Plant Protection and Mr.
Carver of. Macdonald Accounting
have, become closer than
the proverbial Siamese twins.
• Mr. Willis Reil has received
a call from "the old
man with the whiskers". His
place in. the Engineering
Department is still vacant.
Mr. Rei1's immediate superior
has listed the specifications
for his"replacement:
"it" must be feminine and
redheaded with brown eyes.
Bernie Says: "Don't 'forget
the Dance in the Big
Tent Tonight."
. 'WhV was the rigger who fell
in the hydro-separator? He
thought the foam was concrete
nd blithely Stepped off.
The mud bath he received" was
good for his rheumatism.
climate of understanding and full participation.
The Council, with the cooperation of
"Partners" who have joined in support—
mayors, governors, organizations, business
and labor, in addition to many concerned
citizens with and without disabilities-*-is
carrying out a grassroots effort to offer every
community in the nation an opportunity to
improve the lives of their citizens with
disabilities and help our country meet the UN
challenge successfully.
BEYOND THE INTERNATIONAL YEAR
Beyond the challenge of today, beyond the
International Year, life goes on. For many of
our citizens it will go on with a disabling
condition. The U.S. Council believes that the
partnerships formed now, the initiatives in
research and technology that are planned
today, will provide the foundation for "full
participation" in the decades ahead.
WHAT YOU CAN DO
As with any challenge, success depends
upon the resources and commitment of the
participants. So if you are a corporate
executive, an individual^ community leader,
an elected official or a representative of an
organization—whether you are a person with
a disability, or a person without, whether you
know a person with a disability or not—the
International Year of Disabled Persons is a
year for you to make a contribution. The
mission of the U.S. Council is stated in this
brochure. Use it as a guide, and in your most
creative fashion decide how you can best
participate. Every effort is big, and every one
counts.
Write or call the U.S. Council for more
information on what you can do.
U.S. Council for IYDP
1575 Eye Street, N.W. Suite 430
Washington, D.C. 20005
(202) 638-6011
U.S. Council for the
Internotionol Veor of Disabled Persons
1575 Eye Street, N.W. Suite 430 Washington, D.C. 20005
1981
MISSION STATEMENT
The Council's mission is to promote the
full participation in the life of our society of
America's citizens with physical and mental
disabilities. Building on the progress of the
past decade, the Council will work together
with private and governmental organizations
to strengthen public understanding of
the still unmet needs and potential contribution
of these 35 million people. The Council
will foster the partnership of Americans
from all walks of life in furthering the
following long-term national goals of and
for our citizens with disabilities:
• Expanded Educational Opportunity;
• Improved Access to Housing, Buildings
and Transportation;
• Greater Opportunity for Employment;
• Greater Participation in Recreational,
Social and Cultural Activities;
• Expanded and Strengthened Rehabilitation
Programs and Facilities;
• Purposeful Application of Biomedical
Research Aimed at Conquering Major
Disabling Conditions;
• Reduction in the Incidence of Disability
through Accident and Disease Prevention;
» Increased Application of Technology to
Ameliorate the Effects of Disability;
® Expanded International Exchange of
Information and Experience to Benefit
All Disabled Persons.
MEETING THE CHALLENGES THROUGH PARTNERSHIPS
1981
U.S. Council for the
International Year of
Disabled Persons (IYDP)
Meeting the Challenges Through Partnerships
OFFICE OF THE PRESIDENT-ELECT
WASHINGTON
December 8, 1980
TEXT OF MESSAGE
FROM RONALD REAGAN
TO DAVID T. KEARNS, CHAIRMAN
U5. COUNCIL FOR THE INTERNATIONAL
YEAR OF DISABLED PERSONS
I am pleased to join you today in your call to
action for the International Year of Disabled Persons.
I am proud that during my tenure as Governor
of California, laws were passed which created significant
opportunities for the physically and mentally
disabled persons in employment, education,
health care and rehabilitation, and that executive
actions were undertaken to include the disabled
in the decision making process of government
agencies which provide services to the handicapped.
A great deal remains to be accomplished here
and around the world. I am confident that through
your efforts, the coming year will bring a new
sense of awareness by people throughout the
world of the needs, problems and human potential
of disabled individuals. I pledge to you my cooperation
in this worthy and essential undertaking.
THE CHALLENGE
We Americans are a unique people—
unique in our diversity and in our ability,
demonstrated time and again since 1776, to
set aside our differences in responding to
challenges.
Some Americans, especially those 35
million with physical or mental disabilities,
face special challenges each day as they seek
to achieve full participation in our society.
To move more slowly because of age, to
find our way by sounds and touch, to require
a kindness or a helping hand: these are not
uncommon conditions. What should be
uncommon in America is limited participation
because of these conditions, or our individual
differences.
Each of us will have some disability at some
time in our lives—an illness, injury or an
infirmity due to old age. For some it may be
temporary; for others it is life-long. It is more
difficult for some than for others; but,either
way it's not easy. All Americans with
disabilities are challenged—challenged to
live with their special disability, but with
equal rights, equal dignity and hope.
THE UNITED NATIONS RESOLVES
Today there is a new challenge . . . and a
hope. The United Nations General Assembly
has proclaimed 1981 as the International Year
of Disabled Persons, and has challenged each
nation to establish goals and programs aimed
at improving the lives of its citizens with
disabilities. The UN set "full participation" as
the theme of the Year, and encouraged each
country to observe the Year in a way suitable
to its social structure and its particular stage of
development.
AMERICA RESPONDS
Sparked by the collective thinking of many
concerned citizens, the U.S. Council was
formed as a nonprofit organization to promote
the UN observance. The Council cooperates
closely with the Federal Interagency Committee
for IYDP and with other public and
private agencies.
YEARS OF PROGRESS
The U.S. Council has set out to build on the
progress that has already occurred in the
areas of disability—progress that has
established America's leadership as a
defender of human rights and as a nation
advanced in biomedical research, accident
and disease prevention and technological
application. The Council alsowillbuiidonthe
progress many individuals and organizations
have made in helping persons with disabilities
help themselves.
In the past ten years, we have seen physical
barriers to persons with disabilites coming
down. Ramps are replacing stairs. Doorways
are widening. Sign language is more
apparent. New transportation systems are
giving persons with physical disabilities new
mobility. Employers are finding persons with
disabilites truly able and opportunities are
expanding. America's technological and
medical advances are improving the human
condition, while making life's barriers easier
to overcome.
But there is more to do. Much more. We
begin with being involved, learning more
about disabilities, how we can help and how
we can hurt.
MEETING THE CHALLENGES THROUGv
PARTNERSHIPS
For all Americans who wish to :
effort of this special International
wish to benefit from the "full p. .
of all of our citizens, the U.S. Co
the creation of partnerships thro;
nation. These partnerships, which
disabled and nondisabled A r ,
every sector of our socio .
The Las Vegas Chapter of
Links, Inc.
Presents
Lillette Jenkins
In Concert
at the Spacious Estate
of Dr. Lonnie Hammargren
(recently featured on "The Rich and Famous")
WHO ARE THE LINKS???
The Links, Inc. is a charitable organization of
over 5000 women with 162 chapters located in
thirty-seven states and the District of Columbia.
It was founded by Mrs. Sarah S. Scott and
the late Mrs. Margaret R. Hawkins in Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania on November 9, 1946. The
organization was born out of necessity facing
new concerns and mid-century imperatives in
human rights. For more than thirty years, the
organization has continuously redefined its
focus in order to make the name "Links" not
only a chain of friendship, but a chain of
purpose.
We serve as a "Link" to the community to promote
Educational, Civic and Inter cultural
activities. Nationally, Links, Inc. provides
enrichment experiences for talented youth who
are educationally disadvantaged and culturally
deprived as well as for the talented youth who
need aid. An example of our spirit of charity
continues with over $1,000,000.00 contributed
to the United Negro College Fund and the many
thousands contributed toward the Water Wells
in Africa along with support given to many
other organizations when the causes are geared
to civic achievement and voluntary public service.
\Vi°
Locally, an Art Exhibit was held in order to
expose the talents of some of our disadvantaged
youth within the Inner-City. Proceeds from Art
sales (a "Link" percentage) went toward the
purchase of Black History Books to be placed in
one of our School Libraries. Again, locally;
we sponsor a young lady, Vanessa Thomas, with a
full scholarship at Howard University where she
is a Pre-Med Student. Events such as this one
tonight, the Paul Balfour Concert at the Dunes,
the Bullocks' Affair with Fashion Show and the
Paul Collins' Women of Color Art Exhibit will
enable us to assist more young people with their
educational goals.
Our main focus is Service to Youth and with your
continued support, our horizons of service will
become full-circle.
WELCOME MAGGIE PEARSON, President
ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS LEE MORRIS, Chairman
ANNA BAILEY, Co-Chairman
MARTHA JORDAN, Co-Chairman
MINI AUCTION BOB BAILEY & GREG MORRIS
* * * * * * * * *
CONCERT LILLETTE E. JENKINS
* * * * * * * * *
DANCING *****
HORS d ' OEUVRES ********
COCKTAILS
Three Bars (Two on Lower Level, One on Upper Level)
Two Buffets (One on Each Level)
The Las Vegas Chapter of
Links, live.
Maggie Pearson, President
Dorothy J. Dickerson, Vice President
Anna Bailey, Recording Secretary
Rose Brown, Corresponding Secretary
Deborah L. Moore, Treasurer
Marquentta Porter, Financial Secretary
Edna Perkins* Parliamentarian
Inez Archie
Jarmilla B. Arnold
Ethel Booker
Gwen Booker
Alice Carter
Angela W. Clarke, M.D.
Charlotte Cook
Hazel J. Gay
Lois T. Ice.
Martha Jordan
Lee Morris
Beverly A. Neyland, M.D.
La Neal Rayford
Gayle Rogers
Patricia Thlley
Geraldine J. Thornton, D.D.S.
Robbie J. TVoutman
Dorothy West
Olivia Williams
Sharon K. Willis
Thank you for your continued support.
— Limited Seating —
Speak No Evil UPlfcto
Heavyweight challenger Ken Norton tries to keep champion Muhammad
Ali quiet by covering his face as he passes the champ en route to the
podium at the National Press Club luncheon they both attended Friday,
te two meet Sept. 28 in Yankee Stadium with the crown on the line.
NAACP To Benefit
From Title Fight
WASHINGTON (UPI) - Muhammad
Ali pledged Friday to donate
$100,000 of his purse from next
month's heavyweight title fight with
Ken Norton to help a leading black
civil rights organization in a multimillion
dollar damage suit brought by
a group of white Mississippi
merchants.
The champion made the announcement
at a National Press Club
lunch at which he and Norton —
mostly Ali — were speakers.
He said the money from his $6
million take from the Sept. 28 fight
would go to the National Association
for the Advancement of Colored People
which lost a preliminary legal
battle when Mississippi Chancery
Court Judge George Haynes awarded
$1.25 million to 12 Fort Gibson businessmen.
They claimed damages on
grounds that a black boycott initiated
by the NAACP in 1966-67 was a
violation of state antitrust laws.
The lunch appearance of Ali and
Norton was a prelude to a closing
banquet of the World Boxing Association
convention at which Secretary of
State Henry Kissinger, Ali and six
former heavyweight titleholders
were guests of honor. On hand for the
dinner were Jack Dempsey, Joe
Louis, Jersey Joe Walcott, Floyd
Patterson, Joe Frazier and George
Foreman.
At the National Press Club, Norton
used about 90 seconds of the 10
minutes allotted for his speech to
predict "an interesting fight" at Yankee
Stadium. Ali used 40 minutes of
his 10 minutes to lecture seriously as
a Black Muslim on the lack of peace
and morality among men.
"We have the best of everything in
America and the lowest of morals,"
he told his listeners.
But Ali the showman surfaced
during an ensuing question-and-answer
period. Asked about a WBA
ruling that he must fight Foreman
within 90 days if he defeats Norton,
the champion crowed: "I'm not
going to fight him in 90 days. I'm the
champion and I'll fight him in 91.
They should make a public apology
for this...they're not going to give me
a deadline."
Ali commented that "if George
Foreman dreams he could beat me,
he should wake up and apologize,"
then continued nonstop:
"They could take my title off the
books and it wouldn't mean a damn
thing... All I need anyplace in the
world is a pair of boxing gloves and
an opponent named Joe Blow and I'll
draw a million dollar gate. What
counts is who puts the behinds in the
seats.
"I dare them to take my title. I'll
stop the boxing game. I'm the real $6
million man."
Ali didn't even pause to reflect
when the question was put, "Why are
you so humble?"
"It's hard to be humble when
you're as great as I am," he came
back and went on for several hundred
moife words.
At one point when Norton sought
to respond to a question, Ali persisted
in interrupting from the side
and the challenger finally got a word
in edgewise by sitting on Ali's lap
with the microphone in hand.
The cnampion was in fine verbal
form at a reception before the lunch.
On entering, Ali made a beeline for
the challenger sitting quietly with an
orange juice and for starters said:
"I'll never let a chump like you whip
me."
As Norton smiled, Ali declared
and some of his entourage took up
the chant: "I promise you you're
going to fall, you're going to fall,
you're going to fall."
When someone in the surroi
crowd showed signs of anger,
i n t e r j e c t e d : " K e e p c o o l , f o o l , w e t
building the gate."
W
s4tMoccU
CIMMtiCtMENI EXERCISES <Stc^csr^
^a4L 'feyad *r¥iy& ScAoal
BUTCHER MEMORIAL FIELD
WEDNESDAY, MAY 24, 1950 - 8:15 P.M.
LAS VEGAS, NEVADA
Soviet SducatiaK
ROBERT O. GIBSON, PRESIDENT
DR. J. D. SMITH W. M. McCLURE
DR. QUANNAH S. McCALL MRS. GEORGE E. MARSHALL
ScAooi acuity
WALTER D. JOHNSON, SUPERINTENDENT
GEORGE E. HARRIS, PRINCIPAL
WALTER V. LONG, VICE PRINCIPAL
ALMA MATER
i
Nestling near the golden foothills,
'Neath the western sky,
Rests the jewel of the desert,
Dear Las Vegas High.
u
Then when all our work is ended,
And the years gone by,
Memory's hand will guide our footsteps
Back to Vegas High.
CHORUS
Sing her praises ever louder,
Echoing back and back,
Hail to thee, dear Alma Mater,
Valiant Red and Black.
I. PROCESSIONAL MARCH HIGH SCHOOL BAND
II. FLAG SALUTE MARY ANN GOURLEY, DAVID STEPHENS
III. INVOCATON DAN LEE DAVIS
IV. "THE ROAD BEYOND-A DYNAMIC ERA" LEE EDWARDS
PRESIDENT OF THE CLASS OF 1950
V. "SCIENCE, THE MASTER" KEITH HAYES
STUDENT BODY PRESIDENT
VI. "MAY DAY CAROL" TAYLOR ARRANGEMENT
"SOFTLY AS IN A MORNING SUNRISE" ROMBERG
LAS VEGAS HIGH SCHOOL CHORUS - MISS ARDIS AULT, ACCOMPANIST
DIRECTOR - LOREN N. CROSS
VII. SALUTATORY-
"HUMAN RELATIONS, THE PROBLEM" PAULINE WACHTER
VIII. "MERRY MAIDEN OVERTURE" FULTON
HIGH SCHOOL BAND - LOREN N. CROSS, DIRECTOR
IX. VALEDICTORY—"THERE OPENETH A WAY" ELSA KURTZ
X. PRESENTATION OF AWARDS GEORGE E. HARRIS
PRINCIPAL OF HIGH SCHOOL
XI. PRESENTATION OF CLASS
TO BOARD OF EDUCATION WALTER D. JOHNSON
XII. PRESENTATION OF DIPLOMAS DR. QUANNAH S. McCALL
MEMBER OF BOARD OF EDUCATION
NAMES ANNOUNCED BY BETTY DENSMORE - WILLIAM MARCUS PEYTON
XIII. ALMA MATER BAND, CHORUSES, AND GRADUATING CLASS
XIV. BENEDICTION ALICE FROYD
XV. RECESSIONAL MARCH HIGH SCHOOL BAND
Carl Ray Abercomble
Donna Lee Allan
Lela Allen
Shirley Anderson
Ray Elvin Andress
John Leonard Anzalono
Donna Arnfeli
Roberi Thomas Ashworih
De Onne Aswegan
Ardis Aull
Carl Lee Bailey
Yvonne Ballinger
June Banner
Ruih Barfield
Robert Emmeii Barrett
Rose Barrett
Donald Jo Bell
Luana Bengan
William A. Bishop
Clara Boen
Nina Bogdanovich
Ann Boyd
Eleanor Bradford
Anthony Bravo
Delores Bravo
Marilyn Brewer
Ralph F. Brooks Jr.
Bonnie Brown
Jacqueline Brown
Bobbie Brumett
Laura Burlingame
Anthony Jo Campagna
Jack Conrad Cherry
Paul J. Chrisiensen
Paul Allan Clawson
Stanley A. Clifton
Donna Cook
Mona Lea Corrington
Mack G. Croft
George A. Cromer
Betty Cummings
Beverly Cusick
Dan Lee Davis
Glorious Davis
Betiy Densmore
George C. Donnell
Irene Du Bois
Pierre Du Bois
Joyce Edwards
Lee R. Edwards
Ruth Epperson
Gordon Elliott Farndale
George Fredrick Ferris
William Ellis Findley
Arthur Foote Jr.
Richard Lamar Foote
Senior Class Advisors; Joseph E. Thiriot — Mateel W. Vocker
Betty Foster
Kenneth Bryan Freeman
Alice Froyd
Billie Lee Galloway
Clark Martin Gammel
Amelia Garcia
Irene Gibbs
Nancy Giunloli
Linda Glavey
Elaine Goddard
Roberta Gordon
Mary Ann Gourley
James R. Gwilliam
Joseph Carlisle Hannig
Maiiie Harris
Richard Lee Hartwell
Gilbert Melvin Hayes
Keith C. Hayes
Barbara Hodson
Rodney Charles Imming
Karen Ivy
Beverly Johnson
Freeman W. Johnson
James Milton Jones
Robert Charles Kidder
Phyllis King
Virginia Klein
Edward John Kovacs
Elsa Marie Kurtz
Pete Paul Kuvelis
Jimmy Larnin
Donald B. Larson
Ella Leavitt
Darwin C. Lightfoot
Donna Logan
Pauline McBeriy
Robert S. McConnell
Gerald R. McCulloch
Frank MacPeck
James W. Marshall
Marvin Dohn Martin
Nancy Mason
Kathryn Mathews
Jean Mat3on
Douglas Dean Medberry
Earl F. Mellott
Bernard Martin Mendelsohn
Lawrence R. Miles
Richard M. Miller
Eylle Mohr
Lupe Molina
Dolores Morales
Herbert Mormon
William Edward Mull
Patrick C. Murphy Jr.
Marilyn Naegle
Harlie Arnold Olive
Ronald L. Osborne
Nellie Rae Pace
Sydney Pace
Charles R. Parsons
Arlene Perkins
Marion Peterson
Jean Marie Pettit
William Marcus Peyton
Billie Poison
Hazel Deene Potter
John Donald Pulliam
Ralph M. Purdy
Juanice Rankin
William Record
Marilyn Riggs
Blair E. Roach
Catherine Roberts
Claire Roberts
William Duane Robinson
Sylvia Russell
Dayle Kimball Rust
John R. Sanchez
Barbara Sexsmiih
Grace Sinyard
Paul Edwin Sisk
Ralph Jay Simon
Kathleen Sprague
Daniel Arthur Stadtlander
David Eugene Stephens
Dan Reed Stevens
Maureen Stevens
Merwin U. Stewart
Harold J. Stokes
Joanne Thompson
Pat Thompson
Ed R. Torres
Mollie M. Torres
Paul Trinayslich
Orangie Turman
Joe Urtado
Robert Dean Vaughn
Wilbon Louis Vaughn
Silvia Vinassa
Charles Lawrence Ward
Pauline Wachier
John Thomas West
Georgia Whatcott
Kay Wheeler
Frank E. White
William Edward White
Jssma Wilcox
Leland Edward Williams
Clarence M. Worthen
Betty Yorty
BLACK
Heroines
HISTORY
San Francisco
n American
torical and Cultural
Society
Founded 1955
680 MCALLISTER STREET
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 94102.
(415)864-1010
J & ^
Victory Is Promised..
BYRON J. FITZGERALD
In the solitude of this moment,
look not back over your shoulder.
Days gone, are simply gone,
yesterday's trials, are simply over.
In age, there is eternal youth,
the spirit grows wiser, but not older.
Keep your eyes, fixed on God's truth,
victory is promised, to His soldiers!
Dedication
This year the Society dedicates
the 1979 Black History Week Celebration
"Black Women: The Unsung Heroines"
to FRANCES WALKER ROSTON MILLER
San Francisco African American Historical and Cultural Society
Ms. Miller was born in Shreveport, Louisiana. She
attended public school in Shreveport and then went
to Southern University at Baton Rouge, graduating
in May 1919. She taught school in Shreveport and
Tulsa, Oklahoma. Ms. Miller is the mother of four
children, eleven grandchildren, and eight great grandchildren.
Over the years Ms. Miller has worked in business,
has travelled and has had extensive volunteer civic
endeavors.
In October of 1954, Ms. Miller was instrumental
in developing a San Francisco Chapter for the Study
of Negro Life and History at 1928 Page Street. In
1955, this Chapter for the Study of Negro Life and
History combined efforts with Mr. James Herndon,
Esquire, of the W.E.B. DuBois Club and established
the San Francisco Negro Historical and Cultural
Society. The Society's name was changed to the
San Francisco African-American Historical and
Cultural Society, Inc. in 1970.
"My only hope is that
throughout the years the Society
will stand out as a beacon light
for the generations coming on."
Compliments of Congressman John V, Burton and Congressman Phillip Burton
yfitrw
8"+T- <+T77.
ax'-ICO AFfc/r,
680 McAllister Street
San Francisco
California 94102
864-1010
FOUNDERS
Frances Roston Miller
James Herndon, Esquire
HONORARY DIRECTORS
Joan A. Brann
Director, International Communication Agency
Blanche Brown
Member, San Francisco Art Commission
Arthur H. Coleman, M.D., J.D.
Past President National Medical Association
H. Welton Flynn
Member, San Francisco Public Utilities Commission
Ernest J. Gaines
Author, Member of California Library Services Board
Carlton Goodlett, Ph.D., M.D.
Editor-Publisher Sun Reporter, Metro Reporter
Group and California Voice
Nathan Hare, Ph.D.
Clinical Psychologist, Editor of the Kupenda
Courier Messenger
Vernetta Hill
Member, Board of Directors, Friends of the
San Francisco Public Library
Asa G. Hilliard III, Ph.D.
Dean, School of Education,
San Francisco State University
Jule Johnson
Member, San Francisco Board of Education
Sue Bailey Thurman, D.H.L..
Historian, The Sanderson Foundation
1979 Board of Directors
Officers of the Board
PRESIDENT
Cora Cade-Lemmon
344 Spruce Street
San Francisco 94118
(W) 558-2151
VICE PRESIDENT
Charles Hampton
24 Westline Drive
Daly City 94015
(H) 755-7390
SECRETARY
Carolyn A. Garrett
916 Buchanan Street
San Francisco 94102
(W) 561-3448, (H) 922-7305
TREASURER
Ida Strickland
944 Market Street, No. 705
San Francisco 94102
(W) 543-0890
PERSONNEL CHAIRPERSON
Dr. Sodonia Wilson
540 Darien Way
San Francisco 94127
585-2028
SECOND VICE PRESIDENT
Mary Forte
3261 Blandon
Oakland 94605
(W) 894-3799
ASSISTANT SECRETARY
Anna L. Turpin
200 Arguello Boulevard
San Francisco 94118
(H) 668-1923
PARLIAMENTARIAN
Robert Garner
1727 Page Street
San Francisco 94117
(W) 622-6833, (H) 621-6485
Board Members-at-Large
Willena Bady
6016 California Street
San Francisco 94118
(H) 221-3266
Rena Bancroft
381 Los Palmos Drive
San Francisco 94127
583-1480
Eldoris Cameron
3519 Morcom Avenue
Oakland 94619
536-2368
Teressa Griffin
839 Forty-First Avenue
San Francisco 94121
751-6564
Julia Hare
1895 Jackson
San Francisco 94109
(H) 474-1707
Dave Johnson
P.O. Box 764
Sausalito 94965
(W) 666-2889, (H) 332-0623
Lisa Tealer
286 Campana Avenue
Daly City 94015
(H) 992-3772
Doris Ward
695 John Muir Drive, No. 602
San Francisco 94132
(H) 239-2403
Black History Week 1979 Committee
Cora Cade-Lemmon, Chairperson and Blacks in the
West Hall of Fame Awards Committee
Ethel Nance, Calendar and Senior Citizens Activity
"Three Black Women Poets/Writers, Their
Works and Music"
Elena Albert, Director of J.B. Sanderson Club and
Senior Citizens Activity, "Three Black Women
Poets/Writers, Their Works and Music"
Anita Nance, ads, sponsors, patrons, and donors
Aleece Walker, "A Musical/Cultural Potpourri"
Veda Swift-Jeffries, "5 Black Women Artists,
An Exhibition"
Veronica Raglin, "A Musical/Cultural Potpourri"
Gloria Swift-Johnson, Photographer
Julia Hare, KSFO, Moderator, "Black Women,
Their Lives, Their Loves, Their Dreams," an
open studio discussion between Black Men
and Black Women
Shirley Matthews, United Negro College Fund,
Black Women in Higher Education
Institutions," film and discussion for Black
high school students
Lisa Tealer, "Black Women in Higher Education
Institutions"
Sharon Brown, "Survival Strategies for Contemporary
Black Women — Keeping Fit Emotionally,
Physically, and Financially"
Charlotte Hollis, "Survival Strategies"
Mary Forte, "Survival Strategies"
Naomi Gray, "Survival Strategies"
Wanda Osborne, concessions
Robert Garner, concessions
Mattie Walker, Children's Program "Who Am I?"
Vera Brown, Children's Program, "Who Am I?"
Willena Bady, Gallery Docents
Deborah Johnson, Member-at-Large
Ethel Penha Vandervall, Children's Programs
Bernice V. Brown, Member-at-Large
Kerry Nelson, Organization Liaison
Ostenia Fleming, Organization Liaison
Claudia Simmons, Organization Liaison
Carolyn Alexander, Member-at-Large
Justine Wylie, "Stay at Home Tea Party,"
a fund-raiser
Cheryl Jones Roussel, mailing
James Cheatum, Member-at-Large
Marianne Mann, mailing
Dwight Turner, Member-at-Large
Betty Martin Coleman, Blacks in the West Hall of
Fame Awards Committee
Glen R. Nance, Program Assistance
Bruce Hunter, Souvenir Programs Editor and Blacks
in the West Hall of Fame Awards Committee
Gail Reid, Research Fellow
Carolyn Howard, Secretary
Deborah Major, Staff Librarian and children's program
Arthur Monroe, Curator
Clarence Maloney, Executive Director
We of the Society
happily and cordially
invite you
to participate in our celebration of Black History
Week, February 10—18, 1979. Our theme this year
will focus on Black Women: the Unsung Heroines."
The entire celebration will highlight the beautiful
and exciting facets of Black Women.
Throughout the year, the Society offers many programs
on the historical and cultural experiences
of African-Americans. The Society was founded in
1955 as a non-profit, tax-exempt membership organization
and an independent body affiliated with
~Fhe Association for the Study of Afro-American
Life and History, inc.
Our purposes are: to correct distortions about African-
American life and history, to present an accurate
account of the contributions of African people to
world culture and history, and to instill pride in
African-American Youth for their heritage.
We serve the community by providing the following
services: art gallery, educational classes, library,
museum, research assistance, meeting space, senior
citizen services, youth development programs, speaker
resource, and tours.
We of the volunteer Black History Week 1979 Committee
are certain that you will enjoy our celebration.
BLACK HISTORY WEEK 1979 COMMITTEE
Organizations Assisting in Black History Week 1979 Celebration
Bay Area Association of Black Social Workers Program
Assistance
Jack and Jill, Inc., Who Am I?" Children's Program
San Francisco Graduate Chapter of Delta Sigma Theta Inc
opening night reception, Program Assistance
Carpe Diem, "A Musical/Cultural Potpourri" Reception
San Francisco Links, Inc. Reception Hosts
Bay Area Howard University Alumni, opening night reception
Program Assistance
National Council of Negro Women, Reception Host
Negro Business and Professional Women, Reception host
Delta Zeta Omega Chapter of Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority
Inc., Black Women: Their Lives, Their Loves Their '
Dreams" Reception
BLACK WOMEN:
The Unsung Heroines
FEBRUARY 10-18, 1979
All Events Free to the Public
Saturday, February 10
6 p.m. OPENING CEREMONIES and
BLACKS IN THE WEST HALL OF FAME
Induction — Herbst Auditorium,
Veteran's Building, Van Ness and McAllister
San Francisco Civic Center
8 p.m. Opening "FIVE BLACK WOMEN ARTISTS
— An Exhibition" Through February 28 —
San Francisco African-American Historical and
Cultural Society, Inc., 680 McAllister Street
Free Reception
"THE MARKET PLACE" A Fund Raising
Sunday, February 11
4 p.m.-6p.m. "A MUSICAL/CULTURAL
POTPOURRI," Music from the Classical,
Jazz, Contemporary, Gospel and Spiritual
categories presented by Sacramento and Bay Area
artists at the Society's Museum and Gallery
680 McAllister Street - Free Reception
Monday, February 12
10 a.m.-6 p.m. "FIVE BLACK WOMEN ARTISTS
- An Exhibition," Through February 28, Society
Gallery, 680 McAllister Street.
10 a.m.-6 p.m. DOCENT TOURS for schools,
and families through the Society Museum and
Gallery, 680 McAllister Street
Tuesday, February 13
1 p.m.-3 p.m. "THREE BLACK WOMEN POETS/
WRITERS, Their Works and Music," a senior
citizen activity hosted by the J.B. Sanderson
Club at the Society Museum and Gallery,
680 McAllister Street
10 a.m.—6.p.m. DOCENT TOURS for schools,
groups, and families through the Society's
Museum and Gallery
Wednesday, February 14
7:30 p.m.—9:30 p.m. "BLACK WOMEN: Their Lives
Their Loves, Their Dreams" - an open studio
discussion between Black Men and Black Women
Julia Hare, KSFO moderator
Free Reception, The Society's Museum and
Gallery, 680 McAllister Street
10a.m.-6p.m.DOCENT TOURS for schools, groups
and families through The Society's Museum and
Gallery — Free
Thursday, February 15
5 p.m.-7 p.m. "BLACK WOMEN IN HIGHER
EDUCATIONAL INSTITUTIONS,"
film and discussion for high school students,
sponsored by the United Negro College Fund
The Society's Museum and Gallery, 680 McAllister
Free Reception
Friday, February 16
7:30 p.m.-9:30 p.m. "LIFE FOR ME AIN'T BEEN
NO CRYSTAL STAIR," Keynote Address by
Diane Lewis, Ph.D., Anthropologist. The Society's
Museum and Gallery, 680 McAllister.
Free Reception
10 a.m.— 6 p.m. DOCENT TOURS for schools,
groups, and families through the Society's
Museum and Gallery
Saturday, February 17
8:30 a.m.-5:00 p.m. "SURVIVAL STRATEGIES
FOR CONTEMPORARY BLACK WOMEN:
Keeping Fit Emotionally, Physically and Financially"
John Swett School, 727 Golden Gate
(around the corner from the Society)
8:30 a.m. Registration
9:30 "Taking Care of Self," Jan Faulkner, L.C.S.W.
Clinical Director of Pacific Psychotherapy Assoc.
12:00 Noon Brown Bag Lunch
1:00 AFTERNOON WORKSHOPS
"Black Women in Politics"
"Black Women in Business"
"A Holistic Approach to Survival"
"Black Women in Law and Medicine"
"Black Women and Financial Management"
4:15-4:30 "Rap Up!"
4:30—6:30 CELEBRATION: Black History Week
1979 Committee
10 a.m.—6 p.m. DOCENT TOURS for schools, groups
and families through the Society's Museum
and Gallery — Free
Sunday, February 18
3 p.m.—5 p.m. "WHO AM I?—A Children's Program,"
works from Black Women in literature; THE
STORY OF ROSA PARKS, a short play
The Society Museum and Gallery, 680 McAllister
Herbst Theatre, owned by the City and County of
San Francisco and operateo through the Board of Trustees
of the War Memorial: Mr. Phillip S. Boone,
Mr. Fred Campagnoli, Mrs. Joseph D. Cuneo,
Mr. George T. Davis, Mr. A. Adrian Gruhn,
Mrs. Evelyn Haas, Mr. Sam K. Harrison,
Mr. Krikor Krouzian, Mr. Oscar M. Preston
PATRONS, ATTENTION, PLEASE!
FIRE NOTICE
There are sufficient exits in this building to accomodate
the entire audience. The exit indicated by the lighted EXIT
sign nearest your seat is the shortest route to the street.
In case of fire, do not run, WALK THROUGH THAT EXIT.
Opening Ceremonies
San Francisco African American
Historical and Cultural Society, Inc.
1979 Black History Week Celebration
BLACK WOMEN: THE UNSUNG HEROINES
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 10, 1979 - 6:00 P.M.
HERBST AUDITORIUM
Van Ness and McAllister—San Francisco Civic Center
Doris Ward Mistress of Ceremonies
The Black National Anthem: "Lift Every Voice
and Sing" Aleece Walker, Accompanist
Invocation Honorable Jule Johnson
Member, San Francisco Board of Education
Greetings from the
City of San Francisco .... Supervisor Ella Hill Hutch
Greetings Cora Cade-Lemmon, Chairperson
Black History Week 1979 Committee
Introduction of Guest Speaker Fola Obebe
Wife of the Consul General of Nigeria
"Black Women:
The Unsung Heroines Honorable Diane Watson
Senator, State of California, Guest Speaker
"The Greatest" Musical Selection . . . Trusty and Teal
Aleece Walker, Accompanist
1979 Inductees into the
BLACKS IN THE WEST HALL OF FAME
"12 Outstanding Black Women . . Cora Cade-Lemmon
Chairperson, Board of Directors San Francisco
African-American Historical and Cultural Society
Acknowledgements Cora Cade-Lemmon
"Be a Lion" Musical Selection Trusty and Teal
Aleece Walker, Accompanist
Immediately following the ceremonies,
everyone is invited to the 8:00 Opening of
FIVE BLACK WOMEN ARTISTS - An Exhibition
February 10-28, 1979
San Francisco African-American
Historical and Cultural Society, Inc.
680 McAllister Street
Reception hosted by:
Bay Area Howard University Alumni Chapter
Flowers Courtesy of Esther's Florist, San Francisco
Plants Courtesy of California Street Nursery
Auditorium Centerpiece Courtesy of
Roserie Florist, San Francisco
Illustration: Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, August 5, 1876.
FIVE BLACK WOMEN ARTISTS
An Exhibition
February 10-28, 1979
The Society Gallery
680 MCALLISTER STREET
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA
Tuesday—Saturday 10:00 A.M.—6:00 P.M.
Frances Dunham
Catlett
57 Majestic Avenue
San Francisco, California 94112
(415) 334-6328
Artist, Teacher, Social Planner
B.A. Boston University
M.A. Mills College
M.S.W. University of California
Basic arts, crafts and ceramics - Mills College
Composition, oils, charcoal - Dr. Sterling and the
Fenton Kastners, Legion of Honeur
Painting, all media — Leonard Bregger, University
of California
Oil, color, drawing - Nate Olivera and Dor Bothwell,
Institute of Fine Arts
Artists Workshop — Richard Bowman
"As a painter, I do not view the brush, palette knife
and canvas as a camera. There is a magnificent mystery
in the universe, behind the recognizable and familiar
patterns. In the unseen background is the pulsing
of the energy released and forever coming from the
original "big bang." To hint on canvas of this energy,
to capture light and color and the myriad feelings
racing back and forth between people seems to be
my involvement.
"I have membership in the National Conference of
Artists and the Center of Visual Arts. I have been
exhibiting since 1968. National listing: Directory of
Afro-American Artists, Boston Public Library, 1973.
"Thirty-five collectors of my work spread from
San Francisco, Berkeley, El Cerrito, Richmond,
Vallejo, Los Angeles, and as far as Toronto, Canada."
Major art showings include:
1965 — Show of "Bay Area Negro Artist" — Palo Alto
White Ribbon Award (3rd)
1968 — "Afro-American Art Exhibition" — Flayward
1968 — "New Perspectives in Black Art" — hosted
by the Oakland Museum, Art Division, at Kaiser
Center Gallery and presented by Art-West
Associated North, Inc.
1969 — "Pleasant Hill Invitational"
1969 — Invitational for the "Great Duke Ellington
Symposium" — UC Campus, Berkeley
1971 — Presented by the Links in "Fine Art
Reception"
1972 — Black Expo — Polk Hall — San Francisco
1974 — Oakland Museum — FESTAC Exhibition
1976 — Delta Sigma Theta Certificate of Award
1977 — Public Library — San Francisco
1973—78 Group Shows — Cyprian and Grace
Cathed rals
THE WORKS
"Energy in Pattern" — 48"x36" — Acrylic — 1976
$1,500
"Roots Imagery" - 24"x30" - Acrylic - 1978
$400
"Man's Inhumanity to Man" - 28"x30" - Acrylic
1975 - $500
"Pullpower of the Waters" - 24"x24" - Acrylic
1976 -$475
"Energy in Pattern II" - 40"x40" - Acrylic
$600
"DUO" - 30"x40" - Acrylic - 1975 - $425
"Pullpower of the Waters 11
1978 - $325
" — 18"x24" — Acrylic
"Pullpower of the Waters 11
1978 - $325
" — 18"x24" — Acrylic
"Color and Light Dyneray"
1977 - $400
— 18"x24" — Acrylic
"Neo-Ritual I" - 40"x40" - Acrylic - 1978 - $500
"Neo-Ritual 11" — 48"x24" -Acrylic - 1978-$400
"Blue Space" - 48"x36" - Acrylic - 1978 - $1,500
Bernice Garner
Bernice Young Garner has resided in San Francisco
since 1946. She is a native of Salt Lake City, Utah.
Education:
University of Utah
Fisk University, Nashville, Tennessee, B.A.
University of California Extension.
Studied with artist Eleanor Dickinson.
Influences:
Matisse, BruegeJ, Vuillard, Audubon, and Nature.
Exhibits:
Four-Person Annual Art Show, St. Cyprians's
Episcopal Church, 1972-78.
Group Show, Grace Cathedral, 1974.
"FESTAC," Oakland Museum, 1974.
One-Woman Show, Eleanor Dickinson Studio, 1975.
Salute to Black Artists," Delta Sigma Theta Sorority
Three-Branch Group Show, San Francisco Public
Library, 1977.
UNCF exhibit, 1978.
Collections:
Mr. and Mrs. Elliott Williams
Mrs. Leo Van der Reis
Mrs. Cassandra Amerson
Mrs. William Keanes
Mr. Charles Molle
Mrs. Eleanor Dickinson
Mr. and Mrs. Bernard Wilkin
Justice and Mrs. Bernard Jefferson
Mrs. Marion Young
THE WORKS
"Grandpa" - 28"x21" - Oil on Canvas - 1971
Not for Sale
"Woman in Striped Flat" — 21"x15" — Oil on Canvas
1972 — Not for Sale
"Red, White and Blue" — 41 "x33" — Pastels — 1976
$135
"View from My Window" — 24"x18" — Oil on
Cardboard — 1972 — $125
"The Gift" — 24"x16" — Oil on Canvas-Covered
Masonite — $150
"Summer Idyll" — 24"x30" — Oil on Canvas
1976-77 - $175
"Vegetable Arrangement" — 16"x24" — Oil on
Canvas-Covered Masonite — $150
"Love" — 32"x16" — Not for Sale
"Yosemite Meadow with Butterfly" — 11"x15"
Oil on Canvas-covered Masonite — $75
Gloria
Swift-Johnson
Photographer
Ms. Johnson enjoys her first showing with our exhibition.
We are pleased to show her work and wish
her encouragement and success.
Marie Johnson
Born: Baltimore, Maryland
Education: Morgan State College, Baltimore,
B.A., 1952
Graduate Studies: San Jose State College, M.A., 1968
Los Angeles, 1971.
Contemporary Black Dimensions, de Saisset
Art Gallery, University of Santa Clara, 1971.
Three Assemblage Interpretations: Noah Purifoy,
Dale Davis, Marie Johnson, Brockman Gallery,
Los Angeles, 1972.
Eleven from California, Studio Museum, New
York, 1972 (catalog published).
Black Mirror, Womanspace, Los Angeles, 1973.
Four Black Artists, San Jose State
University, 1973.
Blacks, USA, 1973; New York Cultural Center,
1973 (catalog published).
A Third World Painting/Sculpture Exhibition,
San Francisco Museum of Art, 1974 (catalog
published).
Directions in Afro-American Art, Herbert F.
Johnson Museum of Art, Cornell University,
Ithaca, New York, 1974 (catalog published).
West Coast '74: The Black Image, E.B. Crocker
Art Gallery, Sacramento, 1974 (catalog published;
also shown at Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery)
Five Black Women, Center for the Visual Arts
Gallery, Illinois State University, Normal, Illinois,
1975 (catalog published).
Other sources: An American Essay, San Francisco
Art Institute, 1976 (catalog published).
The work of Marie Johnson reflects experiences
and perceptions of Afro-American society, through
her art, she expresses what it means to be a woman,
to be black, and to be an artist in a society such
as ours.
She creates life-size images of Black people in various
settings and situations. Her silhouetted and painted
wood figures, attired in discarded garments, are
life-like interpretations of people living through
Stanford University Fellowship, 1969.
San Francisco State University, doctoral
equivalency approved 1977.
Selected One-Woman Exhibitions:
Lucien Labaudt Art Gallery, San Francisco, 1964
Foothill College, Los Altos, 1967.
San Jose, 1968.
Brockman Gallery, Los Angeles, 1971.
William Sawyer Gallery, San Francisco, 1971,
Triton Museum of Art, Santa Clara, 1973.
Howard University, Washington, D.C., 1974
Selma Burke Art Center, Pittsburgh
(sponsored by the Carnegie Foundation), 1975.
Selected Group Exhibitions:
Black Arts Today, San Jose State College, 1968.
New Perspectives in Black Art, Oakland Museum,
Kaiser Center Gallery (catalog published), 1968.
Expo '70, Osaka, Japan, 1970 (organized by
the San Francisco Art Commission,
catalog published).
The Black Experience — Seven California Artists,
San Jose State University, 1971.
The Black Experience — Occidental College,
their daily experiences. Some of the works are
entire environments suggesting slices of real-life
situations, isolated as illusionistic reality. Other
works are symbolic figures or portraits of well-known
Black historical personalities. The message is clear
and uncompromising and conveys a sense of frustration,
anger, or loneliness, but also, and most
importantly, one of love and pride.
THE WORK5
"Silver Circle" - 36" diameter - mixed media - 1973
$1,500
"Mrs. Jackson" - 36" high - mixed media - 1968
$1,500
"Papa the Reverend" — 48"x30"x3" — mixed media
1970-$1,500
"Middle Class' — 48"x60' x4 ' — mixed media
1977 - $2,000
"Frederick Douglass, Early Militant" — 45"x30/2 x5
mixed media — $1,000
The Winner" — 5'x20" — mixed media — $500
Marie
Johnson
Top Left — "Mrs. Jackson"
Bottom Left — "Frederick Douglass, Early Militant"
Top Right — "Dream Deferred," Not shown in exhibition.
Bottom Right — "The Vanity," Not shown in exhibition.,
Four-Person Annual Art Show, St. Cyprian's.
"Black Artists on Art," by Samella Lewis, published
by Contemporary Crafts Publishers, Los Angeles.
"As a painter of abstract paintings, I frequently
begin a canvas without 'preconception.' At some
point in its loose development, the canvas dictates
to me. I proceed under this influence until I 'sense'
that it is time to stop. In examining the finished
painting I feel curiosity, surprise, some admiration
and much wonder that I did it."
THE WORKS
"Blue Mood" - 18"x24" - Acrylic - 1977
Not for Sale
"Dark Continent" — 32"x18" — Acrylic
Not for Sale
"Landscape" - 24"x24" - Acrylic - 1976
Not For Sale
"Landscape" — 30"x36" — Acrylic — 1976
Not for Sale
"Landscape" — 9"x12" — Acrylic — 1976
Not For Sale
"Landscape" — 9"x12" — Acrylic — 1976
Not for Sale
Laura E. Williams
Ms. Williams was born in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.
She studied art with Richard Bowman, Redwood City
College of San Mateo.
Exhibits:
"The Negro in American Art," honorable mention.
"New Perspectives in Black Art," honorable mention.
San Francisco Annual Art Festival, Civic Center.
"The slave deck of the bark 'Wildfire' brought into'Key West on April 30, 1860." Illustration: Harper's Weekly, June 2,1860.
The Society wishes to thank the following businesses for their creative assistance.
IE SHOPPE BUSINESS CARD PRINTERS
BUSINESS STATIONERY
UNUSUAL NOTE CARDS
and'
GALLERY
741 Fourteenth street
San Francisco, ta. 94110
and tyitl
rfmeiica,, IKC.
San Francisco Chapter
"To ignore the plight of children is not only wrong,
but dangerously so."
The San Francisco Chapter of Jack and Jill of America, Inc.
has been a growing and an active organization in this city
since October, 1951; it was chartered in July, 1952. The aims
of this organization are: To seek for all children the same
advantages which we seek for our own. To support all
National legislation aimed at bettering
the condition of all children.
President, Martha Elmore
California
Librarians'
Black Caucus
Northern
joins you in celebration
of Black History Week, 1979
and congratulates the
outstanding efforts of the
San Francisco African American
Historical and Cultural
Society, Inc.
BAY AREA
HOWARD UNIVERSITY
ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
HONORS
BLACK WOMEN
55 Sutter Street, Box 146
San Francisco, California 94104
THE PRINCESS MADIA.—[FROM A DAGUEP.REOTYI>E.J
Illustration: Harper's Weekly, June 2, 1860.
1978-79 OFFICERS
President: KERRY L. NELSON (983-7236)
Vice President: CLAUDIA N. SIMMONS (444-7080)
Corresponding Secretary: MARIANNE A. MANN
Recording Secretary: CARMEN DAVIS
Treasurer: JAMES CHEATHAM
m ( g r e e t i n g ?
1
MAY
KEEP TEE
TORCE BURNING
WITE A
ONE O F THE H E A I . HEROES O F HARD M A R C I I I N U .
Our Compliments POSITIVE ELAME
Mr. and Mrs. Larry Forte
Caroltjn and \ larding Cd^arrett
I l l u s t r a t i o n : F r e d e r i c k Remington i n Harper's Weekly, December 2 2 , 1 8 8 8 Aileen C. Hernandez and Associates salutes
the stamina of Black Americans
who have persevered
through 360 years
in this country.
nilccn c. Hernandez & associates
Aileen C. Hernandez
Eleanor R. Spikes - Patsy G. Fuletter
Urban Consultants
444 Geary Bou1erard3 Suite 10,1
San Franeiseo. California 94118
415-387-4221
Regardless of cost
every funeral is conducted with
dignity, beauty and reverence.
at the Bryant Mortuary
635 Fulton Street • 861-4559 • San Francisco
Off Street Parking
Best Wishes to
a fine organization
that provides
leadership
for our
community.
MK's
BEAUTY
SALON
344 Divisadero
San Francisco
861-4252
Naomi Gray Associates
salutes
the African-American Historical
and Cultural Society
on the occasion of
the celebration of
Black History Week
featuring
the contributions of
Black Women.
Hawaii. Get away to it all.
Nobody can take you to Hawaii like United. Our Royal
Hawaiian Service brings the spirit of the Islands right on
board. So you can visit Hawaii on your way to Hawaii.
It s our little corner of the world. For information
call your Travel Agent. Or call United.
This i s some bird of paradise!
Assemblyperson jp
Willie L. Brown, Jr
It s our history. .
BEST WISHES
TO
THE SOCIETY
Jayne Ware-Williams, President
HEALTH CAREERS INFORMATION
AND RECRUITMENT PROJECT CENTER
1033 Ocean Avenue
San Francisco, California 94112
(415) 585-9325
Best Wishes Im
soil and Manuenenl
MUM
sorEmuwEi 1300 Eddy street
San Francisco, California 94115
A RETIRING SCOUT.
Illustration: Frederick Remington in Harper's Weekly, December 22, 1888
Arthur H. Coleman, MD, Inc.
DELTA SIGMA THETA, Inc.
San Francisco Alumnae Chapter
A Public Service Sorority
Illustration: Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, August 5, 1876.
One Hundred Dollar
Sponsor
KRON - CHANNEL FOUR
Sponsors
DR. ZURETTI GOOSBY, D.D.S.
ETHEL NANCE
HENRY L. CLARK
MYRTLE H. WILLIAMS
C. BRUCE LEE, Ph.D.
WILLIE and MAE MAYS
DR. and MRS. HOWARD THURMAN
Patrons
EURTHA TRAMMEL
ROSE RANDOLPH
DON BENZ
JUNE KELLER
RHONDA LAVENDER
CLYDE WILLIAMS
PAUL ROSENBERG
LARRY FORTE
OSTENIA FLEMING
ETHEL P. VANDERVALL
ANITA NANCE
BRUCE HUNTER
MR. and MRS. ROBERT GARNER
CORA CADE LEMMON
MARGARET W. GLYNN
Donors
VERONICA E. RAGLIN
HELENE GORDON
GARY EBERLING
VIRGINIA BUCELLO
MARRTIZA HENKINS
GUSSIE STEELE
GERTRUDE KANNER
CHARLES WIMP
JOHN GANN
CLAUDIA SIMMONS
ISAIAH ROTHBLATT
MRS. JEWEL MULLINS
HENRY L.CLARK
MR. and MRS. RALPH W. HUNTER,
Los Angeles
MR. and MRS. DAVID V. ROSTON
MS. SANDRA ROSTON, Las Vegas
SOUTHERN UNIVERSITY ALUMNAE
of Northern California
MRS. ALICE ROYAL and Family
EDITH M. DUARTE
DEVOY E. HARRIS
ETHEL PENHA VANDERVALL
MRS. EDITH ABERNATHY
ANNE AKOSUA
LIVINGSTON
MS. N.W. GRIFFIN, Sr.
MADISON HARVEY
The Society
wishes to thank
these persons for their
financial contributions to
Black History Week 1979.
Illustration: Frank Leslie's Illustrated Newspaper, August 5, 1876.
BLACKS IN THE WEST HALL OF FAME
1976 Hall of Fame Inductees 1977 Hall of Fame Inductees
Miyako Hotel Sheraton-Palace Hotel
CHARLESETTA ALSTON ARTHUR COLEMAN
DIAHANN CARROLL ERNEST GAINES
LETITIA HERNDON CHANNEL HAMPTON HAWES*
CLAUDE EVERHART ARDUTH NICHOLS
THOMAS FLEMING DORIS THOMAS
NOAH W. GRIFFIN, Sr.* HOWARD THURMAN
WESLEY JOHNSON, I I I BURL TOLER
ENOLA MAXWELL AMOS WHITE
WILLIAM PIERCE, Ph.D.
RAYMOND ST. JACQUES 1978 Hall of Fame Inductee
ANN WELDON Orpheum Theatre
* Posthumously LENA HORNE
Compliments of WELLS FARGO - ONLY ONE BANK MEANS THE WEST
Illustration: Frederick Remington in Harper's Weekly, March 28, 1885.
In Tribute to
HARRIET TUBMAN
SOJOURNER TRUTH
ROSA PARKS
MARY
McCLOUD-BETHUNE
Ella Hill Hutch
Supervisor, District Four
San Francisco
Board of Supervisors
A CONSISTENT NEGROPHOBIST
Drowning Gentleman: "Take that Rope away, you darned
Nigger! What decent White Man, do you suppose, is going to
allow himself to be saved by a confounded Nig-" (Goes down,
consistent to the last.) - Harper's Weekly, August 16, 1862
AAHCS Fact Sheet
January 18,1979
The African-American Historical and Cultural Society
Library serves as a research facility for students and
scholars of African or African-American history and
culture whether their need be personal or professional.
Requests for information come from throughout
the nation on a wide variety of themes such as accurate
information about Mary Ellen Pleasent (Chicago and
Vermont), a resource list on the history of Black women
in the West (Fullerton University), as well as innumerable
telephoned and in person requests from individuals,
church groups, youth groups, and curious individuals
in the Bay Area community.
The library is composed of over three thousand texts
on, by, or about Africans and African-Americans.
In addition it houses a large historical range of periodicals
including original Ebony, Crisis, and Freedomway
magazines, the Journal of Negro History from its 1916
first edition, and an information file filled with clippings
and illustrations on a cornucopia of Black subjects.
This non-lending library has grown based on donations
of books by generous patrons and is now trying to
fill in gaps in our collection through a directed acquisition
program. We are seeking to develop and/or
complete the collections of some of our literary giants
such as Paul Laurence Dunbar, Richard Wright, Langston
Hughes, Marcus Garvey, Kwame Nkrumah, and J.A.
Rodgers. If you would like to contribute books in any
of these areas, please contact the Society. You can be
sure that your gift will be used to enrich and inform
the community of our true history.
Children's Program
Black History Week
The Library staff of AAHCS assisted by a team of
docent volunteers led by Mrs. Willena Bady are providing
many Bay Area elementary school children with
a multi-media historical program. During Black History
Week and the week following, students will be told
stories about African-American achievers from the
past and present. They will be exposed to an a r t exhibit
that represents some of the manifestations of our
African and American heritages in a present-day context,
and they will be provided with a slide show of important
Black women in history.
Following the tour, teachers will be provided with
an activity sheet full of ideas and projects that will
keep the children aware that Black history is a yearround
happening and all people can be history makers.
Teachers and individual students will be encouraged
to return Black history a r t and creative writing projects
to the Society for showing in the Library during the
month of February. Any student or class responding
will receive a certificate of award for participation
in Black History Week. The AAHCS Library staff
hopes that children will complete the 1979 Black
History Week Program knowing that they can help to
determine the role they will play in the making of
history.
O F F I C E O F T H E M A Y O R
S A N F R A N C I S C O
DIANNE FEINSTEIN
WHEREAS.
WHEREAS.
WHEREAS
proclamation
Many community organizations, including the San Francisco
African-American Historical and Cultural Society, are joining
to commemorate the Fifty-third Annual Black History
Celebration during the month of February, .1979; and
Since i t s formation in September, 1955, the San Francisco
African-American Historical and Cultural Society has taken
a leading educational role in better acquainting all C.'alifornians
with the magnificent history of the African-
American; and
Each year since 1926 a period of time is set aside during
which attention is locused upon the African-American and
his historical background, and stimulation is given to the
general improvement of human relations, the theme for this
year's observance being "History; Torch for the Future-"
and
The African-American has for many generations made substantial
contributions to human progress in the fields of economic
development, science, music, literature, law and many
other fields; and
The month of February, 1979, has been selected "Black History
Month" by the Association for the Study of Afro-American
Life and History;
NOW, THEREFORE. I , Dianne Feinstein, Mayor of the City and County of
San Francisco, do hereby proclaim the month of February, ,1979 to be
BLACK HISTORY MONTH in San Francisco, and hereby call to the attention
of all our citizens the achievements of the African-American and his
contributions to the well-being of all races, which convey an awareness
of the basic principles of democracy to all peoples.
WHEREAS,
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have
hereunto set my hand and
caused the Seal of the
City and County of San
Francisco to be affixed
this sixteenth day of
January, nineteen hundred
and seventy-nine.
4i/>r SfU,
ne Feinstein
Mayor
Lift Every Voice and Sing
Music: J. ROSAMUND JOHNSON - Lyric: JAMES WELDON JOHNSON
F A7 D Gm A Bi> Gfo
Dm
Stony the roaa we trod,
Bitter the chast'ning rod,
Felt in the days when hope unborn had died;
Yet with a steady beat.
Have not our weary feet
Come to the place for which our fathers sighed?
We have come over a way that with tears has been watered;
We have come, treading our path thro' the blood of the slaughtered,
Out from the gloomy past.
Till now we stand at last
Where the white gleam of our bright star is cast.
God of our weary years,
God of our silent tears,
Thou who hast brought us thus far on the way.;
Thou who hast by Thy might,
Led us into the light,
Keep us forever in the path, we pray.
Lest our feet stray from the places, our God, where we met Time,
Lest our hearts, drunk with the wine of the world, we forget Thee;
Shadowed beneath Thy hand.
May we forever stand
True to our God, True to our native land.
From music reprint made available by MARCUS BOOKS, Inc.
LIBERTY HIGH SCHOOL
REUNION
"YELLOWJACKETS"
Aug. 21, 22, 23, 24, 1975
Memorial Field House
Williamson, W. Va.
MAYOR TAYLOR
THE CITIZENS OF WiLLIAMSON ARE HONORED AND CONSIDER IT A
PRIVILEGE TO HAVE THE LIBERTY ALUMNI HOLD YOUR REUNION IN OUR
CITY IN 1975. AS MAYOR, I EXTEND TO YOU A MOST CORDIAL WELCOME
AND ASSURE YOU THAT WE SHALL DO EVERYTHING IN OUR POWER TO MAKE
YOUR STAY A PLEASANT AND MEMORABLE ONE. IT IS MY SINCERE WISH
THAT YOUR REUNION WILL BE A MOST SUCCESSFUL AND PRODUCTIVE ONE
AND I EXTEND TO EACH OF YOU AN INVITATION TO RETURN AT EVERY
OPPORTUNITY.
WITH ALL GOOD WISHES.
CORDIALLY,
ROY M. TAYLOR
MAYOR
DR. DRUE E. CULUMNS
FROM THE PRESIDENT Ui LIBERTY HIGH SCHOOL ALUMNI ASSOCIATION
On behalf of the Liberty High School Alumni Association,
the President is happy to extend greetings and a most cordial
welcome to all the graduates, former students, and teachers,
as well as the visiting friends of the school to this the
SECOND SCHOOL REUNION. Again, the officers, committees, and
members of the local organization join with me in expressing
our thanks and sincere appreciation to all who have assisted
us in any way to make this occasion most pleasant and enjoyable.
The committees have worked zealously and.untireingly
for your comforts and delight. They deserve your highest
commendation. All facets of the community interest in Mingo
County and Pike County have been unstintedly cooperative in
every detail. We owe all of them a debt of gratitude.
We extend greetings and welcome wholeheartedly all of you
who have come from distant places for having, perhaps, foregone
your vacation and taking the chances of hazardous
traveling conditions to be here with us in this area at this
time. We are anxious that the wholesome experience which you
will enjoy throughout our every activity and your entire stay
in the Williamson area will be adequately rewarding. It is our
desire that the highest plateau of decorum and dignity will be
in evidence at all times, so as to reflect commensurate reward
for the efforts and kindness of all who have helped to make
this occasion possible, and surely, the success that it will be
only, if we cooperate to this end. We wish to thank all of
those who have so loyally and graciously supported this undertaking
on the local level. You deserve the highest praise that
we can offer. Please accept my greetings, and thanks to all.
FOREWARD
Tempos fugit, time flys and marches on. Years pass, life
goes on and on. Although, time, tide, and distance have separated
many of the graduates, teachers, and former students
who were once connected with LIBERTY HIGH SCHOOL, the "spirit"
remains intact and continues to grip, stimulate and motivate
as we face the issues of this day. The quest for fame and fortune
has carried not only the former students, but many of the
teachers, as well, to all areas of the states of this country,
and several foreign fields. Wherever any person, who was in,
any way, identified with "Dear Old Liberty", finds himself,or
herself, the LOVE of Liberty High School burns eternal in the
human breast. When memory reviews the busy scenes of by-gone
days spent at the school on the hill, blazing in the sun as a
beacon of light pointing the way to academic excellency, we
doff our hats wherever we are and pause for a moment of silent
reflection and meditation.
At the name of the school, LIBERTY HIGH SCHOOL, we are overwhelmed
and stand in awe with nostalgia. We are constrained to
recall that it was during our life at Liberty High School, as a
student or teacher, that lasting impressions were made, which
have influenced our lives, no matter what course of action fate
has decreed for us. Many can recollect, and only a few fail to
remember, and appreciate the fact that whatever of achievement
and worthwhile accomplishment, or outstanding status in life
that we now enjoy; we owe, at least our humble beginning, to
what was offered at Liberty High School. It was Liberty High
that habits were formed and lessons learned that have given
color and direction and character to our many lives.
Again, therefore, it is little wonder that on occasions of
the school's reunions we meet;
1. To greet and revive, and enjoy the fellowship reminiscent
of the wholesome experiences that tend to bind kindred spirits
into one impregnable whole.
2. To re-live the experiences of the past as a basis of present
appreciation and future anticipation.
3. To pledge anew our allegiance and dedication to the memory
of an institution that is honored to claim us as its graduates,
former students, or teachers; and an institution that
honors us by its mantle of academic approbation; and,
4. To establish and maintain our participation in the total
program of an active, organized, fuctioning Alumni Association,
that will perpetuate the ideals of the school by a
lasting memorial, scholorships, or to take other appropriate
actions of a progressive nature.
To these ends, it is felt that we will address our thinking
and guide our deliberate action at this the SECOND SCHOOL REUNION
of Liberty High School. May the "Old Liberty" spirit guide
and direct us, in our every endeavor.
•i *
LIBERTY HIGH SCHOOL
Volumes could be written after years of research, compilation,
and all that goes with a documented treatise that
tells the complete story of an educational agency with such
a colorful background as Liberty High School, Williamson, W.
Va. Because of limited time and the lack of adequate space
in this program, only a few of the highlights and salient
facets of the school's rich history are considered here. No
intent is made to include all the offerings and contributions,
or names of everybody who helped to make Liberty High School
what it was and what it meant to so many and still means to so
many throughout our land and the countries of the world. You
who read this will understand and appreciate the fact that
materials in this presentation are taken from what the writer
had submitted to him. Other information pretinent to the history
of Liberty High School can be included if it is presented
by those who have such in their possession-in mind or documenttation.
Even as early as 1923, if not before, many school men gave
serious thought to QUALITY EDUCATION FOR ALL THE PEOPLE. It was
out of this concept in 1923 DuBois High School, Williamson, W.
Va. was born. This was before the County Unit System of Schools
was inaugurated in the State of West Virginia. The school had
its beginning therefore, under the control of the Williamson
Independent District. E.F. Randolph, M. Persinger, and John
Strosnider were school board members for the City of Williamson
at that time, and a Mr. F.N. Hanifan was District Supervisor of
Schools. Wallace J. Williamson provided the land for the school
site. D.W. Hy1ton served as principal of the "Colored" elementary
school, out.of which the high school grew. Mr. Hylton, also, became
the first principal of the new high school. Among others
who were active in the beginning of the High School were Revs.A.J.
Smoots and L.A. Perkins, Doctors James M. Whittico and R.G. Warren
Lawyer Leon Miller, Francis Watts, E.S. Campbell, George Foy and
Allie Wright.
The Principals, other than Mr. Hylton, who served for DuBois
High School, were M.C. Lundeman, Theodore Randolph, and M.C.
Lunderman. In 1927, J.C. Sawyer became principal. It was during
the school year 1927-28 that the name of the school was changed
(because of conflicts with Dubois High School of Mt. Hope, W.Va.)
to Liberty High School. Carl T. Hairston, who succeeded Sawyers
as principal, suggested the name. Mr. Sawyers was the principal
1927-1936. Carl T. Hairston, 1936-1945., Drue E. Culumns, 1945-
1957, and H.T. Joyce, 1957-1966 were the principals until Liberty
High School was absorbed by Williamson High School and the other
high schools throughout Mingo County.
(Continued on next page)
Liberty High School maintained at all times a faculty of
competent teachers, among whom can be named, Miss Bruce,Toney,
Broome, Long, Hambrick, and Glover, English Teachers, Dunlap,
Culumns, Acker, Belcher, Hairston, Primm, Toney, Lomax, and
Austin, Math and Science; Joyce, Abington, Towles, Martin,Social
Subjects; Music, Broome, Sessom, Hogan, Reed, Hagood, and Dexter,
Hairston, P.Clarke, V.Clarke, Ford and Starling, Home Economics.
The graduates of the school can be adjudged successful graduates
are: Dan Ackers, Chemist, Carl Starling, Electronics, Billy Whittico
and Jeff Towles, Medicine, Robert Strother, Ophellius McCoy,
and Louis Jones, Ministers, Dan Palmer, Ed Starling and Raymond
Reed, Athletics, Coletta Warren, Music, and a number of outstanding
classroom teachers.
From its very beginning, Liberty High School excelled in .athletics.
Among those considered Liberty "Greats" are such names as
Cousars, Daggs, McClardy, Miller, Smoots, Carter, Wallace,Showalter,
Fishers, Rumley, Long, Strother, Browns, Taylors., Belchers,
Knox, Towles, Paige, Williams, Foster, Brices, Burgers, Leshore,
Hunters, Dexters, Phillips, Alexander, Stevenson, Gary, Martin,
Joyce, Palmer, Wells, White, Smiths, Hill, Penn, Young, Reed,Sowell,
Reynolds, Ackers, Johnson, Dillingham, Fleshmans, Blackwells,
Welch, Comer, Waters, Harris, Mosley, Ransom, Jones, Morina,Hairston,
Lynch, Whaleys, Thomas, Scales, Fulghams, Lomax, Nelms,
Galloways, Starling, Thaxtons, Culumns, ad infintum. In 1931, the
football team was in the play-off game for the state championship.
In 1966, the basketball team was in the finals of the "A" division
The basketball team was runner-up in the Regional in 1931 & 1938.
Several teams went to the semi-finals in the state tournament. The
Junior High team won the County Tournament in 1962.
State recognitions and awards were won in the areas of Dramatic
Oratory, and High-Y competition. The Liberty Hi-Lite, the school
paper named by T.Dexter was the news organ for the school.
The offerings in courses of study and co-curriculum activities
compared with the best in the state, among the smaller schools-of
maximum enrollment of 350. The smallest class to graduate was 1928
four in number, and the largest class was 1954, with fifty boys
and girls equally divided. Liberty High School was among the first
if not the first, to offer such courses of study as Consumer Education
and Race Relations. The annual "Senior Play": The Athletic
Banquet; and the colorful Homecomming were outstanding events that
received wide publicity and commendation. The "Class" Basketball
tournament was always competative and wholesomely enjoyed by all
except the losers.
Throughout the life of the school the basic concepts were the
worth of the individual, each individual is unique; learning takes
place when there is a reconstruction of experiences that can be
used in further experiences; each individual develops and reacts
as a whole; and should develop to his highest possible potential
that he can make his greatest contributions to our democratic
social order. To these ends the teachers, students, and community
addressed themselves at all times. These guilding ideas created
"The Old Liberty Spirit" that has lasted from year to year in the
hearts of those who loved "Liberty" dear.
Submitted: Jarrett Daggs
Ida Jim Martin
Drue E.Culumns
QUALITY PRINTERS
COMPLETE PRINTING SERVICE
24 - HOUR SERVICE
call 235-2896
701 EAST 4TH. AVENUE
WILLIAMSON/ W. VA
"YOU CAN'T DO BETTER
THAN SEARS"
WILLIAMSON, WEST VIRGINIA
PHONE: 235-1550 - WILLIAMSON
393-3546 - KERMIT
COMPLIMENTS OF
MOUNTAINEER HOTEL
COMPLETELY REMODELED AND REFURNISHED
PHONE 235-2222 WILLIAMSON, WEST VIRGINIA
COMPLIMENTS OF
Benevolent Protective Order of Elks of the World
COMPLIMENTS
OF
PERSIIMGER SUPPLY
COMPANY
QUALITY PRODUCTS
and
DEPENDABLE SERVICE
SINCE
1904
COMPLIMENTS OF
FIRST NATIONAL BANK
Williamson, West Virginia
Each depositor i nsu red to >2aoOO m a OFPOSIt INSURANCf CORPORA!
ESTABLISHED - 1903
COMPLIMWTS OF
Hatfield Maytag & Marine
Service
f/:
0:
/ - > EVHIRUDE
first in outboards
PIGGLY WIGGLY'S STORES
S, WILLIAMSON, KY,
PIKEVILLE/ KY,
PRESTONSBURG, KY,
GRUNDY, VA,
OWNER - BOYD MURPHY
-lb= =
WILLIAMSON, WEST VIRGINIA
Mingo County
Economic Opportunity
Commission, Inc.
it
COMPLIMENTS OF
rmNiTURB
COMPANY
EVERYTHING
FOR
EVERY HOME
LOGAN, W.VA.
WARFIELD, KY.
DIAL 235-2250 - - WILLIAMSON, W. VA.
DEDICATED TO THE SERVICE OF THE
LOW-INCOME AND THE UP-GRADING OF
LIVING CONDITIONS IN ALL AREAS OF
MINGO COUNTY
LARRY HAMRICK, EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
Box 1406 - Phone 235-1701
Louis S, SMITH ED STARLING
DIRECTOR 1972
REUNION
WORTHY CONTRIBUTOR TO REUNION
BEST WISHES FOR A HAPPY
AND SUCCESSFUL REUNION
COMPLIMENTS OF
THE MAN'S SHOP LTD.
The fashion shop for
men and boys.
PROGRAM
LIBERT^ HIGH SCHOOL REUNION
OPENING NIGHT—AUGUST 21, 1975
P U B L I C
Presiding ....Mr. Drue E.Culumns President
Music Mrs. Grace Reed Pianist
Song "Lift Every Voice and Sing" Audience
Invacation Rev. Eugene Johnson Local Pastor
Welcome Mr. Roy Taylor Mayor
Welcome Mr. Billy Lee Vice President
Response to Welcome Mrs. William o. Thomas
Cleveland, Ohio
Inspirational Singers "A" and "B" Selections
Mr. Leon Anderson, Director and Mr. Charles Donald, Pianist
History of Liberty Mrs. Mollie Long
Reading Mrs. Gussie Lipscomb
Solo. Mrs. Willo June Mosely
Presentation of Speaker Mrs. Verona A. Clarke
Address Mr. James Douglas Comer .... Counselor Manager
Columbus, Ohio, Bureau Vocational Rehabilitation
Recognitions and Announcements Mr. Drue E. Culumns
Memorial Period Audience Standing
Song "LIBERTY ALMA MATER" Audience
Benediction Rev. J. W. Bell, Local Pastor
LIBERTY REUNION PROGRAM
Activities at the Memorial Fieldhouse
Thursday, August 21
8:30 AM - REGISTRATION
7:30 PM - PUBLIC MEETING
Friday, August 22
8:30 AM - REGISTRATION
2:00 PM - PARADE
9-12 PM - HOSPITALITY
Saturday, August 23
8:30 AM " REGISTRATION
10 AM ~ 3 PM ~ PICNIC
10 PM - 2 AM - GRAND BALL
Sunday, August 24
11 AM " CHURCH SERVICES
ABOUT THE GUEST SPEAKER
J. Douglas Comer graduated from Liberty High School
in Williamson, West Virginia. He is a graduate of Ohio
State University where he majored in History and Social
Studies and majored in Health and Physical Education. He
holds a Masters Degree from Kent State University in Physical
Education, Sociology, and Social Work.
Before coming to Ohio State University, he attended
Bluefield State Teachers College at Bluefield, West Virginia.
After graduating from Ohio State, he attended Ohio Dominican,
where he studied Fiction Writing. For three years, he belonged
to the Columbus Writer's Club.
Comer is a fomer athlete. At Bluefield, he played football
and basketball. He organized a basketball team within the university.
His last year in college, he wrestled for the
championship of. Ohio Colleges. A few years ago, he helped
organize the Beatty Tennis Club, and he has played with the
team since that time.
He is on several boards, and a member of Omega Psi Phi
Fraternity.
His wife Ruby, holds a Master's Degree from Xavier University
and works as a Mental Retardation Specialist with model
cities. They have three children: Charles, who is a football
coach at Western Michigan University. Barbara Clarke, a teacher
in Canton, Ohio. Beverly Hargrove, a teacher in South Carolina.
Comer worked as a Social Worker and a Recreation Director
before taking the job with the Bureua of Vocational Rehabilitation,
where he is a Counselor Manager.
Three years ago, Comer and William H. Graham formed a writing
partnership. Comer writes the plays and Graham writes the music.
J. DOUGLAS COMER
LIFT EVERY VOICE AND SING
Lift ev'ry voice and sing,
Till earth and heaven ring,
Ring with the harmonies of Liberty;
Let our rejoicing rise
High as the list-'ning skies,
Let it resound loud as the rolling sea.
Sing a song full of the faith that the dark past has taught us
Sing a song full of the hope that the present has brought us;
Facing the rising sun of our new day begun,
Let us march on till victory is won.
Stony the road we trod,
Bitter the chast'ning rod,
Felt in the days when hope unborn had died;
Yet with a steady beat,
Have not our weary feet come to the place for which our fathers sighed?
We have come over away that with tears has been watered
We have come, treading our path thro' the blood of the slaughtered,
Out from the gloomy past,
Till now we stand at last
Where the white gleam of our bright star is cast.
God of our weary years,
God of our silent tears,
Thou who has brought us thus far on the way;
Thou who hast by Thy might,
Led us into the light,
Keep us for-ev-er in the path, we pray
Lest our feet stray from the places, our God, where we met Thee.
Lest our hearts, drunk with the wine of the world, we £or-get Thee;
Shadowed be-neath Thy hand,
May we for-ev-er stand,
True to our God, True to our Native land.
ALMA MATEll
In the State of West Virginia,
Gloriously she rest (Repeat)
Gloriously she rest;
Stand our dear old Alma Mater,
Dear old L.H.S.
Liberty High School ever onward.
Banners Gold and Blue (Repeat)
Banners Gold and Blue;
Hail to thee our Alma Mater,
Hail to thee so true.
We love no other, for we know the best;
Dear old L.H.S.
Standing high above the rest.
In the State of West Virginia,
In the State of West Virginia
Gloriously she rest (Repeat)
Gloriously she rest;
Stands our dear old Alma Mater,
Dear old L.H.S.
Dexter and
Starling
JOHN D. YATES
EXXON STATIONS
TUG VALLEY
BRANCH
PIKEVILLE NATIONAL BANK
AND TRUST CO.
1411 W. 3RD AVENUE
WILLIAMSON. W. VA. Appalachian Plaza
Box 1058, Williamson, W. Va. 25661
Telephone (606* 237-6050
W & E CHEVROLET SALES, INC.
Main St.
Mate wan. West Virginia 25678
Phone? 426-8244
PEARLY EPLING, DEALER
W & E CHEVEROLET
SALES, INC.
We Want Your New Chevrolet
To Be The Best Car You Ever Owned!
COMPLIMENTS OF
The National Bank
of Commerce
REUNION COMMITTEE
Phone 235-5454
WILLIAMSON, WEST VIRGINIA
Compliments Of
PINSON MOTORS, IIMC © Volkswagen
PHONE 237-4436
KENTUCKY SIDE WILLIAMSON, W. VA,
The Manor Resturant & Club
COFFEE SHOP
BANQUET
DANCING
"FINE FOOD, FAST SERVICE"
STEAKS AND SEA FOOD
25 E, 3RD. AVENUE
WILLIAMSON, W. VA.
235-9712 235-4295
COMPLIMENTS OF
Citizens Motor Company |
CHRYSLER - PLYMOUTH - DODGE
WILLIAMSON, WEST VIRGINIA
It's the real thing. Coke. Hi
HARRY ANTHONY RANSOM
Williamson Funeral Home
707 VINSON ST.
PHONE - 235-3131
HARRY RANSOM - MORTICIAN
Jones
Office Equipment Co., Inc.
48 West Second Avenue
WILLIAMSON, WEST VIRGINIA
Compliments
Of
B R O W N ' S
WILLIAMSON'S EXCLUSIVE
FRANCHISE DEALER FOR
ESTEE LAUDER
SCHWACHTER'S
LEADING LADIES WEAR
FOR THE
TUG VALLEY AREA
COMPLIMENTS OF
Builders Service & Supply
J . A. Gugelchuck, Owner
ELECTRICAL - PLUMBING - HEATING
AIR CONDITIONING
SALES - INSTALLATION - REPAIRS
Phones: Office 235-5030 - Res. 235-7816
1409 W. THIRD AVE. - WILLIAMSON, W. YA
HATFIELD
Sporting Goods
169 E. Third Avenue
Phone 235-3180
COMPLIMENTS OF
DUDS AN' SUDS
MAYNARD BROTHERS ENTERPRISES
1428 WEST 4TH. AVENUE
WILLIAMSON/ W.VA.
HAPPY REUNION
CANTEES
Department Store
THIRD AVENUE
WILLIAMSON, WEST VIRGINIA
Compliments Of
akers supply, inc.

COAL FLOAT - CALCIUM CHLORIDE
ROCK DUST - WHITENER
Phone 426-4422
NORTH MATEWAN. WEST VIRGINIA
NENNI S INC.
SINCE 1919
QUALITY SHOES AND CLOTHING
426-4381 MATEWAN, W. VA.
:I S=-—- - ———
ETA PHI BETA SORORITY, INC.
CONGRADULATES LIBERTY ALUMNI
MARY DOTSON, PRESIDENT
BELLE WHITCO, VICE PRESIDENT
WLLENE HARISTON, SECRETERY
MEMBERS
MOLLIE LONG VIOLA MAYLERS
BERNICE JOHNSON
CoSTELLA HAIRSTON BEULAH SMITH
=
!
insurance Arjency, r7nc.
POST OFFICE BOX 103
FOREST HILLS. KENTUCKY 4 1 527
J E R R Y W . R O B E R T S 2 3 7 - 4 7 8 2
MAY & GREEN DOLLAR STORE
The Village Coop
Jeans & Things
147 E. 3RD AVENUE
WILLIAMSON. W. VA. 63 EAST 3RD. AVENUE
WILLIAMSON, W.VA.
COMPLIMENTS OF
State Farm insurance THE GREGORY'S
514 HARVEY ST.
WELCOME
LIBERTY ALUMNI
WILLIAMSON, W.VA. 25661
BEST WISHES
To TRAILBLAZER
LIBERTY HIGH SCHOOL ALUMNI
CINDERELLA BOOT SHOP
WELCOME LIBERTY ALUMNI
VENEZUELA JACKSON CLASS OF '34
J & J CLUB
"JUMPING AND JIVING
JACK BELCHER" OWNER
PHONE 8911
BELCI
426-C
RED JACKET/ W.VA.
M r . & M r s .
James ( B u d )
D a v i s J r .
COMPLIMENTS OF
Roba E . B e a t t y
610^ N,7TH ST,
ROCHELLE/ ILL,
RED JACKET/ W.VA.
WITH FOND MEMORIES
AND BEST WISHES,
Alma F l o r e n c e S c a l e s
BEST WISHES
CLARK X100 GAS STATION
CARL NICHOLS/ MGR
COMPLIMENTS OF
M r . & M r s . James C u r r y
a n d F a m i l y
ERLHAMALIA SPENCER INGRAM »
COMPLIMENTS OF
STROSNIDER DRUG STORE
INC.
"YOUR REXALL DRUG STORE FOR 73 YEARS'
Fountain Service, Drugs, School Supplies
and Cosmetics
Complete Prescription Service
COMPLIMENTS OF
TAYLOR'S JEWELRY
WILLIAMSON, W.VA.
One HOUR mwiim; (Minnas ®
THE MOST IN DRY CLEANING
102 Logan St.
Ph. 235-2330
Williamson, W. Va.
TOTS TO TEENS
YOUNG FASHIONS
128 E, 2ND, AVE,
WILLIAMSON, W VA.
CANTRELL
Sheet Metal & Heating Co.
ROOFING - GUTTERING
AIR CONDITIONING
1426 W,THIRD AVE,
P, 0, Box 1172
WILLIAMSON, W, VA,
THE FLOWER HOOK
5 & 2ND, AVE,
MANAGER - PHIL ABRAHAM
TV CENTER
Record Shop
ONE STOP
TAPES, RECORDS
MUSICAL INSTRUMENTS
NEEDLES & ACCESSORIES
BLACK LIGHT - POSTERS
210 HARVEY ST, WILLIAMSON
SILVERWARE CRYSTAL
L. B. ATKINS, JEWELER
"THE GEM OF THE TUG VALLEY"
WILLIAMSON, WEST VIRGINIA
f c — " — — — — - • -
Maynard's Machine &
Electric Co.
J. D. WESTCOTT
& SON. INC.
WILLIAMSON WEST VIRGINIA
WILLIAMSON, WfcST VIRGINIA
COMPLIMENTS OF
WELCOME BACK
LIBERTY ALUMNI
| HURLEY DRUG STORE
Williamson s Newest, Most Modern
PRESCRIPTIONS - COSMETICS
SCHOOL SUPPLIES AND FOUNTAIN
SS|!Hock, jjtock 8c parrel Q
^Restaurant EST wo
WILLIAMSON, WEST VIRGINIA
COMPLIMENTS OF COMPLIMENTS OF
BALL FUNERAL HOME
NELSON'S
LADIES APPAREL
115 East Second Avenue
Wll LIAMSON, WEST VIRGINIA PHONE 235-1570
COMPLIMENTS OF COLLECTIONS INC
320 E. Second Ave.
Houston DeBerry Leo Venturino, Pres.
8446 South Seeley
Chicago, 11. 60626
• Ifc —
Phone 235-3150 Box 1166
PATRONS
Mr.s Mrs. James Davis Jr. $4.00
Mr.& Mrs. Fred Wright & family $5.00
Mr.fi Mrs. James Hunter & family $5.00
Mr.s Mrs. G.C.Childress & family $5.00
Wirt Marcum $5.00
Mrs. Mary Avery Bryant $2.00
Miss Kathryn Bryant $2.00
Miss Adrianne Bryant $2.00
Mrs. Dorothy Chapman $2.00
Mr. Alex Chapman $2.00
Dr. Drue E.Culumns Sr. $2.00
Mrs. Yvonne Culumns Parrish $2.00
Mrs. Wanda Culumns Joplin $2.00
Att. Imogine Brigerman $2.00
SFC. Drue E. Culumns Jr. $2.00
SFC. William C. Davis $2.00
Mrs. Thelma Jean Smoot $2.00
Charles Bell $2.00
Jackie Kelly $2.00
Rev. B.C. Howard $2.00
Mary Ann Montgomery $2.00
Mr. Phillip Lavender $2.00
Mrs. Betty Lavender $2.00
Robert Hampton $2.00
Danny Belcher Jr. $2.00
Mrs. Evans $2.00
Frank Gayton $2.00
Clarence Johnson $2.00
Joseph Anthony Jones $2.00
Margaret Lorieth $2.00
Mary B. Sowe.ll $2.00
•J la Mae Lee $2.00
Mrs. Tony Stacey $2.00
Mr. £ Mrs. James Dalton $3.00
Paul Gray $2.00
O1lie Hairston $2.00
Mr.s Mrs. Chapman $2.00
K'r . & Mrs. Hairston $2.00
Mr.& Mrs. George Hairston $4.00
Lous Mack $2.00
Mr.& Mrs. Moorer & family $5.00
Louise Gilliam Darwin $2.00
Buster Darwin. $2.00
Mr.& Mrs. John S. Moore $2.00
Mr.& Mrs. Jack Marshall $2 . 00
Jean Marshall Carter $2 . 00
Leanard Marshall $2 . 00
Mr.&Mrs. Frank Moore $2. 00
Mr.& Mrs. Andrew Crockett $2 00
Mrs. Bertie Ford $2 00
Mrs. Willie Joplin $2 00
M-rs r Bobby Ray Hortin $2 00
Mr. Nathan Seales $2 00
Dr. Jeff Towles,H.D. $25
o
o
Rand Cook $5
o
o
Delois Smith $2
o
o
Donations $11 . 3 1
Charles Albert $2
o
o
AREA CHURCH
Greater S"hilo Baptist Church
Vinson St. - Williamson, W.Va.
Rev. E. Johnson, Pastor
Christ Temple Church
Harpen Curve-Williamson, W.Va.
Elder Clarence Moore, Pastor
Church of Christ
Vinson St.-Williamson, W.Va.
Elder D.R.Perkins, Pastor
United Holy Church
Mulberry St.-Williamson,W.Va.
Peace and Goodwell Baptist Church
Chattaroy, W.Va.
Rev. L.C.Howard, Pastor
1st Baptist Church of Stone
Stone, Kentucky
Rev. John Small, Pastor
lit. Carmel Baptist Chur'ch
Huddy, Kentucky
Rev. L.C.Howard, Pastor
Sharon Baptist Church
McVeigh, Kentucky
Rev. J.W.Bell,Pastor
St. James A.M.E. Church
6th Ave.-Williamson, W.Va.
Rev. E.P.Colston, Pastor
Mt. Horab Baptist Church
Lando Mines, W.Va.
Rev. J.W. Bell, Pastor
Mt. Lebanon Baptist Church
Red Jacket, W.Va.
Rev. R.L. Wagner, Pastor
1st Bastist Church of Matewan
Matewan, W.Va.
Rev. Lewis McCain, Pastor
New Bethel Baptist Church
Lobato, W.Va.
Rev. Eugene Johnson, Pastor
Striving Valley Baptist Church
Rawl, W.Va.
Rev. J.W.Bell, Pastor
1st Mt. Zion Baptist Church
4th Ave.-Williamson, W.Va.
Rev. J.C. Roach, Pastor
2nd Mt. Zion Baptist Church
4th Ave.-Williamson, W.Va.
Rev. I.P. Jefferson, Pastor
Logan St. 1st Baptist Church
Williamson, W.Va.
Rev. Roosevelt Hooks, Pastor
REUNION COMMITTEES
PUBLIC MEETING GRAND BALL
Verona Clarke, Chairman
Sam Lomax
Beulah Smith
George Hairston
Billie Lee
Juanita Hooks
Mollie Long
HOSPITALITY
General Jackson Jones, Chairman
Henry Towles
John Towles
Burke Taylor, Sr.
Leon Anderson
Maggie White
Verona Clarke
Clyde Warren
HOUSING
Willa June Mosley, Chirman
Rosanell Towns
Pat Turner
Joanne Childress
REGISTRATION
Elizabeth Wilkerson, Chairman
Selah Siggers
Bernice Ford
Anita Steele
Dottie Hunter
Lucinda Johnson
Mary L. Webster
Willa Juae Mosley
SOUVENIR PROGRAM
Ollie Hairston, Chairman
Lucille Crocket
Odessa Pruitt
PARADE
Paul Gray, Chairman
Burke Taylor
John L. Hambrick
Mary Lee Webster
Ethel B. Spradley
James Siggers, Chairman
William Thaxton
Billy Lee
Bernard Dotson
Norman Phillips
Ronnie Martin
Ralph Wells, Jr.
PICNIC
Frankie Finch, Chairman
Betty Hayes
Inez Thaxton
Lucy Carter
Nancy Hunter
Henry Towles
Archie Bland
Ronnie Childress
James Davis
PUBLICITY
Peggy Patterson, Chairman
Dottie Hunter
Billy Lee
Harry Joyce
Ida J. Martin
Louise S. Smith
Bernice Ford
.MEMBERSHIP-CORRESPONDENCE
Blanche Siggers, Chairman
Selah Siggers
Mollie Long
Juanita Hooks
G. C. Childress
Lois Wells
Wendy Dillard
June Glover
Glover L. Boles
TRANSPORTATION
James Washington, Chairman
James DaIton
Charles Webster
Arthur Lee Childress
Paul Dotson
CHURCH ATTENDANCE
Rev. Eugene Johnson, Chairman
Gladys Harris
Floy McCain
I
MEMORIAL FIELDHOUSE
Williamson, W, Va.
"isfiss1
" - "sj*> L.r •

VICTORIA COURT
a n d
WILLIAMSON TERRACE
O f f e r s
V I C T O R I A C O U R T
OFFERS:
Dwelling Sizes and Rentals
Number of Rooms Monthly Rents
3 Rooms and Bath $10.50 to $15.50
4..Rooms and Bath $11.00 to $16.25
5 Rooms and Bath $11.75 to $16.75
W I L L I A M S O N T E R R A C E
FOR NEGROES
OFFERS:
Number of Rooms Monthly Rents
3 Rooms and Bath $11.50
4 Rooms and Bath $12.00 and $12.25
5 Rooms and Bath $12.75
All Rents Include:
Water, Gas Ranges, Space Heaters, and Storage Cabinets.

* Y
ii m •;
Ix"~~
UNION PLAZA HOTEL
TRIPLE CROWN BALLROOM
SATURDAY, FEBRUARY 24, 1990
5 PM-UNTIL DINNER SERVED 6 PM
DONATION:
TWENTY FIVE DOLLARS
FOR INFORMATION OR TICKETS PHONE
399-1500 363-7280 363-5549