Search the Special Collections and Archives Portal

Julius Jensen Professional Papers (MS-00640)

Abstract

The Julius Jensen Professional Papers (1630-1979) consist of medical research notes, medical journal reprints, manuscript and article drafts, professional and personal correspondence, business and financial records, investment information, travel information, photographic prints, art prints, and collectible books and magazines.

Finding Aid PDF
Date
1630 to 1979
bulk 1920 to 1972
Extent
44.95 Cubic Feet (35 boxes, 1 oversized box)
38.72 Linear Feet
Resource Type
Papers
Related People/Corporations
Access Note

Collection is open for research, with the exception of materials that are restricted to protect personally identifiable information. Restrictions are noted at the file level of this inventory and will be open for research use January 1, 2030.

Publication Rights

Materials in this collection may be protected by copyrights and other rights. See Reproductions and Use on the UNLV Special Collections and Archives website for more information about reproductions and permissions to publish.

Collection Type
Scope and Contents Note

The Julius Jensen Professional Papers (1630-1979) consist of medical research notes, medical journal reprints, manuscript and article drafts, professional and personal correspondence, business and financial records, investment information, travel information, photographic prints, art prints, and collectible books and magazine.

Jensen's medical research notes include information gathered for an unpublished manuscript Familial Hypercholesterolemia: Genetic and Clinical Aspects as well as a draft of the manuscript and case histories, research notes, and analyses created during the 1923 insulin trials at the Ministry of Pensions Hospital, Orpington, England. Correspondence includes letters to and from members of Jensen's family in Denmark, particularly his brothers, the writer Arne Hall Jensen and the artist Helge Hall Jensen, his early mentor Sir John Parkinson, and various personal and business associates. Much of the correspondence is written in Danish. Also included are four seventeenth-century intaglio art prints.

Biographical / Historical Note

Julius Jensen was born in Hellerup, Denmark in 1898, the eldest son of Julius and Hanne Jensen. After expressing an early interest in natural science, evolution, and genetics, his father encouraged him to study medicine. He attended medical school at the University of Copenhagen and the London Hospital Medical College, graduating in 1923 with a degree and licensure from the Royal College of Surgeons and the Royal College of Physicians of England. From 1923 to 1924, he was junior resident medical officer at the Ministry of Pensions Hospital in Orpington, Kent, England, serving first in cardiology under Sir John Parkinson and later as head of the diabetic service under Dr. H. Woodward. In this position, he was responsible for conducting one of the first clinical trials of insulin, newly licensed as the first effective treatment for diabetes.

In 1924, Jensen immigrated to the United States, working for a year in New Jersey before establishing a private practice in Douglas County, Minnesota. In 1926, he held a teaching fellowship at the University of Minnesota and in 1929 he was granted a Ph.D. in Medicine by reciprocity. Soon after, he moved to St. Louis, Missouri and began teaching clinical medicine at Washington University in St. Louis, a position he held until 1946. In 1938, he became a member of the founders group of the American Board of Internal Medicine and published his first monograph, The Heart in Pregnancy. In 1946, he became Chief of Medical Services at St. Luke's Hospital in St. Louis and professor of graduate education at St. Louis City and County Hospital.

Jensen moved to Las Vegas, Nevada in 1953 and soon established a private practice in cardiology. He accepted a consulting position at Southern Nevada Memorial Hospital, becoming the only Las Vegas physician with the ability to read electrocardiograms, and became a visiting lecturer in cardiology at the University of Southern California (USC). In 1963, Jensen retired from active practice and began teaching at USC full-time. During this period he collaborated with Dr. David Blankenhorn on several investigative studies on familial hypercholesterolemia and heart disease.

Julius Jensen retired from teaching and research in 1972 and returned to Las Vegas, where he died in 1982.

Sources:

Julius Jensen Professional Papers, 1630-1974. MS-00640. Special Collections and Archives, University Libraries, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Las Vegas, Nevada.

"Obituaries," Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA), November 19, 1982, Volume 248, Number 19.

Arrangement

Materials are arranged by material type.

Related Collections

The following resources may provide additional inforation related to the materials in this collection:

Wengert Family Photograph Collection, 1890-1966. PH-00046. Special Collections and Archives, University Libraries, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Las Vegas, Nevada.

University of Nevada, Las Vegas Photograph Collection, approximately 1900-2004. PH-00062. Special Collections and Archives, University Libraries, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Las Vegas, Nevada.

Single Item Accession Photograph Collection, 1870-1987. PH-00171. Special Collections and Archives, University Libraries, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Las Vegas, Nevada.

Preferred Citation

Julius Jensen Professional Papers, 1630-1979. MS-00640. Special Collections and Archives, University Libraries, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Las Vegas, Nevada.

EAD ID
US::NvLN::MS00640
Acquisition Note

Materials were donated in 1975 by Julius Jensen; accession number 1975-071.

Storage Location

Some materials are stored in the Lied Automated Storage and Retrieval Unit (LASR). Advanced notice may be required to access these materials.

Processing Note

In 2019, as part of an archival backlog elimination project, Melise Leech rehoused and arranged the materials, wrote the finding aid, and entered the data into ArchivesSpace.

Finding Aid Description Rules
Describing Archives: A Content Standard
English