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Audio recording clip of interview with Rev. Marion D. Bennett, Sr. by Claytee D. White, January 12, 2004

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Audio file
Download ohr000128.mp3 (audio/mpeg; 901.88 KB)

Information

Date
2004-01-12
Description

Part of an interview with Rev. Marion D. Bennett, Sr. conducted by Claytee D. White on January 12, 2004. Bennett recalls working with Los Angeles labor organizer Jim Anderson to form the Nevada Voters League.

Digital ID
ohr000128_clip
Details
Citation

Reverend Marion Bennett oral history interview, 2004 January 12. OH-00128. [Audio recording] Oral History Research Center, Special Collections and Archives, University Libraries, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Las V

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Digital Provenance
Original archival records created digitally
Language

English

Publisher
University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Libraries
Format
audio/mpeg

What Jim Anderson did, he has an organizer from the labor movement in Los Angeles. So first, he started to summon up the leadership of the community. He would go from church to church and house to house and make a plea for us coming together. Then we organized what we called the Nevada Voters League. That was the first thing. And we got people registered. Then we would endorse candidates. We would do the bio on all the candidates. Then they would put out a ballot. And it got to the place that the whole community would not vote until they got the ballot because they had confidence in us. Then once they saw that the community -- saw that we were real organized -- we voted in a block — we got recognition and attention from all the politicians previously who had ignored us.