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Jon E. Cobain Nevada Southern University graduation scrapbook

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Date
1964-06-03
Description

Jon Eric Cobain's scrapbook with photographs, articles, and items from the June 3, 1964 first graduation of Nevada Southern University (later UNLV).

Digital ID
MS-01105_003
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MS-01105_003. Jon E. Cobain Papers, 1963-2009. MS-01105. Special Collections and Archives, University Libraries, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Las Vegas, Nevada. http://n2t.net/ark:/62930/d1zk5918b

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English

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UON SRIC COBAIN
N S U
JUNE 3. 1964
A SPECIAL TIME
I
LONG WAIT ENDS AT NSV
Diplomas —At Last
... vocas camous 1
By DONALD WARMAN R-J Staff Writer
The pessimists said it would never happen.
They didn’t mean that Nevada Southern University students were incapable of finishing college and getting diplomas.
THEY MEANT that it was unlikely the youths would ever be graduated from the Las Vegas campus, the oft - snubbed little sister of the University of Nevada at Reno.
The most loosely guarded academic secret in the state is that accreditation of NSU as a full - fledged four-year university had to be wrested, tooth and nail, from northern Nevada legislators and a faction within the administration which viewed dimly the steady, unstoppable growth of the underfed but indomitable little sister
AT 10 A.M. Wednesday, 29 NSU seniors and the school’s entire faculty will march into the NSU gym to celebrate a solemn ceremony — the end of undergraduate life — and another, happy one — the evening up of the sibling rivalry of the past seven years.
Gov. Grant Sawyer, who was burned in effigy last year by rebellious NSU students, will deliver the commencement ad- dress.
DR. CHARLES Armstrong, president of the University of Nevada, and Dean William Carlson of NSU will join in the presentation of diplomas.
Members of the university’s board of regents will attend Wednesday’s gathering, which will open with an invocation by the Rev Paul Egerston of the Calvary Lutheran Church and close with a benediction by the Rev. Caesar Caviglia of La^ Vegas, advisor to the NSU New- ! man Club.
Dr. Howard Chase will perform organ music.
THE FIRST graduation diploma ever presented on the Las
Vegas campus will go to Jon Eric Cobain of Las Vegas, president of the senior class. A business administration major, Cobain will receive the degree of bachelor of science.

AT LONG LAST — Never was lettering on the Nevada Southern University's Maryland Parkway signpost put in place with such enthusiasm as this message. The announcement represents not only the achievement of 29 original graduates but of NSU itself. This is the first graduating class in of .he to°HOTO
Candidates for degrees of bachelor of science in business administration are Dominic I. Daileda, Jay Knepp and James L. Rush, accounting majors, and Lewis J. Sonerholm, business administration major.
CANDIDATES for the degree of bachelor of science in education are Larry H. Barnson, physical education; Kay Beach, Evelyn N. Charles, Linda W. Fox, Arthur J. Harszy and Vivian C. Isgrig, elementary education; Ronald M- Johns, English; Helen C. Kearns, Eula M. Knowles and Betty E. Lut- arell, elementary education; Mary R. McDorman, business education; Frances R. 0. Ream and Marion S. Ruhl, elementary education; David E. Shay, mathematics; Mary Jo Spigel- myer, elementary education; Binnie Syde and Carl W Thomas, history, and Joanne B. Weber, elementary education.
Other candidates for the degree of bachelor of science are Joan A. M. Blair, mathematics, and Raymond D. Rawon, zoology.
Nevada Southern
Ceremony June 3
Persons who plan to attend dent of the university, andI William Carlson, dean of Nevada
Nevada Southern’s first graduation exercises Wednesday morning are requested by officials to be seated in the gymnasium when ceremonies begin at 10 a.m.
An academic procession will start the colorful Centennial program with about 100 marchers converging on the gymnasium from the library and
Southern, will present the diplomas to 29 graduates as approved by the Board of Regents. To Jon Cobain, president of Southern’s initial graduating class, will go the honor of receiving the first diploma.
Ceremonies in the gymnasiurr will be opened with invocatioi by Rev. Paul Egerston, Calvary Lutheran Church of Las Vegas Rev. Caesar Caviglia, Nevad
science technological building. --- • ---- - “rinh ,avieP Included in this group will be Southern Newman Club advise members of the Nevada South- and a member of the Cathol
ern faculty and administration, students, and Board of Regents.
Keynote address will be by Governor Grant Sawyer, a 1941 Nevada graduate, who also will be featured in commencement exercises on the University of Nevada’s Reno campus today.
Dr. Charles Armstrong, presi-
Welfare Organization, will givi
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Monday, June 1, 1964
the benediction. Organ musii will be provided by Dr. Rowan
Chase.
Immediately following grad uation, the Nevada Souther! library will be the site of
reception for graduates an their immediate families. |
FIRST DIPLOMA—Jon Cobain, president of Nevada Southern’s first graduating class, is scheduled to receive the first diploma presented by the Las Vegas university.

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Nevada Southern, ddniven
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announced the
(Commencement 8xercue<t
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on COedneidag morning, ^une third (Nineteen hundred and sixhj-^ur at ten o clock
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University of Nevada NEVADA SOUTHERN
FIRST ANNUAL COMMENCEMENT
LAS VEGAS
June Third
Nineteen Hundred and Sixty-Four
 

‘A LOT GOING FOR YOU-GOVERNOR
First Graduates Depart NSU
By DONALD WARMAN R-J Staff Writer
Gov. Grant Sawyer Wednesday welcomed the 29 members of Nevada Southern University’s graduating class to “take your places in a new America.”
“You will have to be a lot better than we have been,” the governor warned them.
“BUT YOU have a lot going for you.”
Sawyer (Class of ’41) headed an assembly of unversity regents and distinguished Nevadans gathered for a solemn send- off to the Las Vegas campus’ first class in the campus gym.
Wearing the blue-and-white robes of a regent and the black sash of a doctor of laws, the former Elko lawyer compared the growth of nine - year - old NSU to that of the parent Reno university itself.
“IN ITS first year, the (original) University of Nevada at Elko was a lone building surrounded by desert waste. In its first year as a campus of its own, the University of Nevada at Las Vegas was a lone building surrounded by desert waste.”
Speaking of the original school’s beginning in 1874. Sawyer said critics deplored its “unfortunate location” and “the expenses of its support, which would bankrupt the Commonwealth before the skeleton of a class could be graduated.”
THE SAME charges were made against NSU seven years ago, Sawyer smiled.
“In the 1950s, many fought appropriations for Nevada
HISTORIC ASSEMBLY — Gov. Grant Sawyer de-
livers Nevada Southern University's first commencement address to a solemn assembly of 29 grad-
University of
uates, 70 faculty
Southern in the belief
members,
that it

“In
the

both
cases, the cries of
Nevada's top officials and its board of regents, and 350 friends and relatives of the Las Vegas campus first graduating class. Graduates are at right of the aisle, faculty members at the left.
REVIEW-JOURNAL PHOTO
would stymie the growth of the parent campus at Reno and dilute the effectiveness of Nevada’s program of higher education.
the prophets of doom were disproved by progress.”
SAWYER pointed out that the student and faculty populations
presented the outstanding grad- i| uate in every future year until 2064. when Nevada will mark its bi-centermial.
Franklin S. Wartman, for 30 years a Southern Nevada official of the federal Bureau of Mines, was awarded the Las Vegas campus’ first honorary I degree. I
Wartman, a 1921 graduate of < the University of Arizona and j now a Las Vegas mining consultant, was named an honorary doctor of science. •
THE TITLE of “distinguished , Nevadan” was bestowed on ■ Robert B. Griffith, chairman of the Colorado River Commission, i a prominent businessman and1 civic leader who has lived in
Las has ber and ern
Vegas since 1905. Griffith been postmaster, a mem- of the city planning board a director of several South- Nevada corporations.
Sawyer himself was awarded an honorary doctorate of laws during commencement exercis-1 es at the Reno campus on Mon-1
of both campuses have doubled Ieda of Las Vegas was presented a Centennial medallion as
within the past six years.
possessing the class’ most out-
To celebrate the Nevada Cen- - .
, .. standing academic record, tennial Year, graduating accounting
major Dominic I. Dai- A SIMILAR medallion will be
day.
U. S. Dist. Judge Roger D. Foley administered to the new graduates an oath of civic responsibility and dedication to educational ideals. It was composed by the late Walter E. Clark, longtime president of the university.
DR. CHARLES J. Armstrong, current president, passed out diplomas, citations and handshakes to the various honorees.
The entire NSU faculty of 69 and some 350 friends and relatives of the graduates were present for the 75-minute ceremony. The graduates were later feted at a reception in the : university library
 


..CLASS »1964


OLDEST, NEWEST — Mrs. Marian Edmunds Cahlan, 92, oldest living graduate of the University of Nevada, extends congratulations to Jon Eric Cobain, president of the Nevada Southern University senior class and first person to receive a diploma from NSU. With them is Mrs. Cahlan's son, John Cahlan. The venerable Las Vegas woman was born in 1875 and graduated from the university in 1895. Both the Cahlans and Cobain are Las Vegans.
REVIEW-JOURNAL PHOTO
 

southern
fowl &imeKem of 1964

SPEAKER — Gov. Grant Sawyer was keynote speaker at Nevada Southern’s first graduation exercises Wednesday. He
predicted the campus would become “one of the outstanding educational centers of the great Southwest.”
NSU Becoming Vital Education Force: Sawyer
ALL TOP MEN — Jon Eric Cobain of Los Vegas, president of Nevada Southern University's first graduating class, rece ives a ceremonial handshake from Gov. Grant Sawyer after being awarded the first diploma in NSU history Wednesday. From the left are Dr. Charles Arm strong, president of the University of Nevada at Reno; Sawyer; Cobain, and Dean William Carlson to NSU REVIEW-JOURNAL PHOTO
FIRST DIPLOMA — John Cobain, right, becomes the first Nevada Southern graduate to receive a diploma. With him is Gov. Sawyer who earlier in the week had received an honorary degree on the university’s Reno campus.
“Within the next decade .
Nevada Southern is going to emerge as one of the outstanding educational centers of the great Southwest, an area marked as the coming dominant force in the new America,” Gov. Grant Sawyer predicted Wednesday.
“NO OTHER undertaking so typifies Nevada spirit as the birth and growth of Nevada Southern,” the governor said in a prepared commencement address.
(See Photo, Page 3)
The four-year-old institution
conferred 29 bachelor of arts degrees Wednesday on its first graduates — members of the Centennial class of 1964. Nevada Southern University now has 1,600 students and six buildings.
Sawyer paralleled the mother university’s birth in Elko 75 years ago with that of the Lasj Vegas institution, and forecast the same success. The University of Nevada is now located in Reno.
FOR SAWYER, the appearance as main speaker marked ja triumphant turn - about from 1 last year.

UNIQUE PAIR — University of Nevada President Dr. Charles Armstrong congratulates Eula M. Knowles and her son, Ben, who both were graduated from Nevada Southern Wednesday. The mother and son graduation wus a unique “first” for the young campus.
DEGREE GIVEN— Franklin Wart man is surrounded by helping hands as he receives honorary Doctor of Science degree at Nevada Southern. He is a metallurgist from Boulder City.
; Las vegas^g Q N
. Friday, June 5, 1964 LOCAL, REGIONAL NEWS LAS VEGAS SUN 9

AS A TEAM—Dean William Carlson of Nevada Southern University congratulates Eula Knowles and her son, Benjamin, both of 2411 Santa Clara Ave., on graduating with NSU's first senior class Wednesday. Mrs. Knowles, an elementary school teacner, worked, on and off, for 30 ytaoatO- fm,sh her undergraduate studies. Her son, in In v “ passen9er °9er|t for Western Airlines -n Las Vegas. R.j pH0T0
Graduation Family Affair For Las Vegas Mother, Son
Graduation
By DONALD WARMAN R-J Staff Writer “Congratulations,” said the schoolmarm to the airline agent.
“Congratulations,” said the airline agent to the school- marm, who is his mother She is 55. He is 28.
BOTH WERE among Nevada
Southern University’s pioneer graduating class in the NSU gym ceremonies Wednesday.
For both Ben Knowles and his mother, Eula, graduation day represented a multiple tri-
urnph. Both enrolled in the
fledgling university when it offered its first classes nine years ago in a loft over the auditorium of Las Vegas High School.
Mrs. Knowles, a first grade instructor at Mayfair School, has been teaching for 30 years, on and off, nine of them in Las Vegas.
BENJAMIN Knowles, a senior passenger agent for Western Airlines, has been hitting the college books, on and off, ever since he graduated from Las Vegas High in 1954.
The Knowles family came to Las Vegas in 1945 from Newport News, Va. It then included
a father, dead since 1959, and a sister, who is now married and) living in Fayetteville, Ark.
Mrs. Knowles began her col-j lege career at the University of Kentucky. “But that was during the Depression,” she reminisced Wednesday. “You can i guess what happened — I had to quit and go to work.”
SHE HAS worked ever since, and won her Nevada teaching credential in 1955 — nine years before Wednesday’s award of a bachelor of science degree in elementary education.
Ben has worked, too, ever| since his graduation from high school. After one semester of college in Virginia, he returned to Las Vegas to cast his lot with 1 an aspiring group of 60 students who were opening NSU in thej crowded high school loft.
Between working hours, he. was business manager of the university’s paper, The Rebel. Yell, in 1955, its editor in 1957 and 1958, and vice - president । of the NSU student body in 1957. j BEN’S DEGREE is that of I bachelor of arts in history.
i The next step for both is sum- i mer school. Ben wants a teaching diploma; his mother wants more training in elementary education.
After nine years, it seems, Wednesday was only a beginning — but a triumphant one.
“Congratulations,” said the schoolmarm to the airline agent.
“Congratulations,” replied the airline agent.

vo.5.thPCrnA?QJ:1T^S—Robed Graduates of Nevada b?«“thern’ ?9- U1 hear graduation day oratory Ldo.e receiving their diplomas in the Wednesday event, .hey were credited by Gov. SaMyer X
disproving “the prophets of doom”, who have predicted establishing the Nevada Southern campus was a mistake. (AH SUNfotos by Ken Jones)


Honorary Degrees, Awards
Two prominent Southern Ne- Ivadans will be honored by an honorary degree and Distinguished Nevadan citation during Nevada Southern’s first gradu- ’ation ceremonies Wednesday morning.
Receiving a Doctor of Science degree will be Franklin Wartman, noted metallurgist from Boulder City, while Robert Griffith, well-known Las Vegas businessman, will receive the Distinguished Nevadan award.
um metal and received a cita-metallurgical research. Commission, a director of the I tion and medal for his work in Griffith, a 1923 graduate of First National Bank of Nevada this field from the U.S. Depart-the University of Nevada, has and also of the Southwest Gas ment of Interior in 1953. been active in both the eco-Corp. He served as Las Vegas
A resident of Boulder Citynomic and civic growth of this postmaster from 1925-1931 and since 1944, he is a graduate of area since his arrival here in was lieutenant governor of the the University of Arizona. The 1905 where he received his ele-Kiwanis Club in 1947.
Titanium Metals Corp, plant inmentary and secondary educa- He is a member of several Henderson, and others through-tion. clubs and service organizations
out the country, are a direct Although retired, Griffith is in Las Vegas and a 33rd De- result of Wartman’s thorough chairman of the Colorado River gree Scottish Rite Mason.
Governor Grant Sawyer, who will be the keynote speaker in the 10 a.m. ceremonies at the campus gymnasium, is due to receive an honorary Doctor of Laws degree during the Reno campus’ 74th commencement exercises today as approved by the Board of Regents.
Four Distinguished Nevadan awards will be made at Reno when 307 bachelor and 44 masters degrees are conferred today. This group includes Richard Barrington, who now resides in Sierraville, Calif., a former Nevadan, now a retired businessman who has devoted years of service to Nevada’s - Indian population; Dr. Mary Fulstone, Smith Valley doctor and presently chief of staff at the Lyon County Health Center; Ralph Lattin, former assemblyman and state senator representing Churchill County; Alfred Smith, former state engineer for 16 years and involved in lengthy service to the state in engineering and mining.
Wartman will be honored for Ms long and distinguished career as a Nevada metallurgist. He is presently senior consultant career as a Nevada metallurgist. He is presently senior consultant and engineer in charge of titanium research, U.S. Bureau of Mines, Boulder City.
He has been noted for his work in perfecting the necessary metallurgical advances in the Kroll process which made possible production of pure titani- '.ision and programmed instruc- I tion is not the prospect they ’ of solving the teacher -hortage, but in their contribution to the quality of instruction. As their use spreads, the basic problem will remain,” says the report.
I The commission reports that j the ability of college students to • , progress toward independent 1 land self-motivated thinking depends in large part on their ■earlier schooling.

Griffith, facing camera, a prominent Las Vegas businessman, is honored with a Distinguished Nevadan award at Wednesday’s ceremonies. It was the only distinguished Nevadan award given on the southland campus.
FIRST DIPLOMA—Jon Cobain, president of Nevada Southern’s first graduating class, is scheduled to receive the first diploma presented by the Las Vegas university.

First Graduating Class for
Nevada Southern
..
VEGAS PIONEERS—This is Wednesday's graduating class at Nevada Southern University's first commencement ceremony in the campus gym. Graduating were, front row, left to right: Frances R. Ream, Marion S. Ruhl, David Shay, Mary Jo Spigelmyer, Virginia Isrig, Ronald Johns, Helen C. Kearns, Eula M. Knowles, Ben F. Knowles, Betty E, Luttrell, Mary R. McDorman, Evelyn N. Charles, Linda W. Fox and Binnie Syde. Standing, in the same order, are


Joanne Weber, Joan Blair, Raymond D. Rawson, James R. Finley, Robert W. Salchert, Phyllis Sesal, Larry Barnson, Kay Beach, Jon Eric Cobain, Dominic I. Daileda, Jay R. Knepp, James L. Rush, Lewis J. Sonerholm and Arthur J. Harszy. William Dailey, standing at the far right, was not a candidate for graduation. He is president-elect of the NSU student body and was student marshal for the ceremonies. Not shown is Carl W. Thomas. R-J PHOTO

WHO’S WHO IN THE WEST 126
COALSON, RAEBURN VAN. motion picture co. exec.; b. Clarkdale. Ga- Mar. 15. 1940; s. Eual Lewis and Jeanct (Wood) C , B E.E., Ga. Inst. l ech.. 1962; rn. Carolyn Ann Cowell, Nov. 1, 1965; I son. Curtis Van. Proposal mgr advanced programs, fed. systems div. IBM, Los Angeles, 1965-68, owner, builder apt. houses. Los Angeles. 1966-68; pres., dir CTC Computer Corp.. Los Angeles, 1968-72, pres., chmn. bd Am. Nat. Enterprises, Salt Lake City, 1972 —; v.p.. dir. Edn. Systems, Inc., Lynwood, Wash., 1970—. Internal. Peripheral Systems, Inc.. Lewistown, Pa.. 1969—. Served to 1st II. USAF, 1962-65. Recipicni Outstanding Contbn. award for motion pictures Hollywood C of C., 1965. Home: 5959 Oakland Dr Salt Lake City L'T 84115 Office: 556 E 2d S Sall Lake City UT 84111
COBAIN. JON ERIC, mergers and acquisitions cons.; b. Las Vegas. Sept 4, 1942; s. Chester and Ruth (Emmet) C.; B.S. (Reid Gardner Meml. scholar), U. Nev., 1964; MBA (Univ, scholar). Northwestern U.. 1965; postgrad. Cornell, summer 1966; m. Ginger Yates, May 24. 1964; 1 dau- Erika. Marketing mgmt, trainee Internal. Harvester Co., Chgo., 1965-66; new product and marketing devel. cons. Emprcsas Mendoza. Caracas. Venezuela. 1966-68; acquisitions marketing research and market mgr. Cosmodyne Corp.. Torrance, Cal., 1968-70; self-employed as marketing cons., Torrance, Cal., 1970; new product and market research mgr. Lear Siegler, Inc., Santa Ana, Cal., 1971-72; with sales dept. Imperial Oil div. Beatrice Foods. Los Angeles, Cal.. 1972; self-employed as profl. mergers and acquisitions cons.. Las Vegas. Nev.. 1970 -. Mem. Am., So. Cal. marketing assns., Friends of Photography, Nat Pilots Assn . Aircraft Owners and Pilo’s Assn . Phi Kappa Phi. Clubs: Bay Cities Tennis. Torrance Tennis (both Torrance); Hawthorne Tennis (Cal ). Office: 225 Bridger Av Las Vegas NV 89101
COBB. JOHN BOSWELL, JR., educator; b. Kobe, Japan. Feb. 9, 1925; s. John Boswell and Theodora (Atkinson) C.; M.A., U. Chgo. Divinity Sch- 1949. Ph.D., 1952; D.Theol. (hon.). Johannes Gutenberg U.. Mainz. Germany. 1968; Litt.D. Emory U., 1971; m. Jean Loftin, June 18. 1947: children Theodore, Clifford, Andrew, Richard. Tchr.. Young Harris (Ga.) Coll.. 1950-53; instr. Emory U., Atlanta. 1953-55, asst, prof., 1955-58; mem. Sch. Theology, Claremont, Cal., 1958 . prof, theology, 1964- Served with AUS, 1943-46. Fulbright prof.. Mainz. Germany, 1965-66. Mem. Am. Acad. Religion. Am Metaphys. Soc., Zero Population Grow th, Arns, for Democratic Action. Methodist. Author: Varieties of Protestantism. 1960: Living Options in Protestant Theology, 1962. A Christian Natural Theology. 1965; The Structure of Christian Existence, 1967; God and the World, 1969; Is It Too Late?, 1972. Editor: The Theology of Altizer: Critique and Response, co-editor: . (with J.M. Robinson) The Later Heidegger and Theology; The New
Hermeneutic; Theology as History. Home: 1009 N College Av Claremont CA 91711
COBB, W ILLIAM ROBERT, newspaper exec.; b. Seattle, Mar. 17, 1929; s. William Meyer and Jean (Ross) C.; B.A.. U. Wash . 1951;; m. Temple Eloise Witt, Mar. 16, 1951; children -Scon William. Stephanie Lynn. Accountant Friedman, Lobe & Block, Seattle. 1951-54, accountant Allied Stores-The Bon Marche, Seattle. 1954-56. controller, 1956-57; asst, controller Seattle Post-Intelligencer, 1957-62, controller, 1962-69. asst, to pub., bus. mgr., 1969 Recipient Order of Merit, Lambda Chi Alpha. 1972. Mem. Wash. Soc. C.P.A.'s, Am. Inst. C P A 's. Inst Newspaper Controllers and Finance Officers (dir. 1970—), Lambda Chi Alpha Lion (dir. Seattle 1967-70). Office: Seattle Post-Intelligencer 521 Wall St Seattle WA 98111
COBBLEY, LEORE, ednl. adminstr; b. Blackfoot, Ida . Aua. 28, 1913; d. Orvil James and Amanda (Christiansen) Cobbley; B A.. U. So. Ida., 1943; M Ed , U. Nev., 1959; Ed.D.. Brigham Young U- 1971. Tchr primary schs.. Idaho Falls, Ida., Las Vegas, Nev., 1934-58; lectr. edn. U. Nev . Reno. 1958-59; prin. Lewis E Rowe Elementary Sch . Las Vegas. 1959-73. George E Harris Elementary Sch.. 1973 Recipient Am Edn. medal Freedoms Found.. 1969, citations for meritorious service V.F.W., 1968, Am Legion. 1968. Nev. State V.F.W., 1968. Mem. Nat. (state rep 1972 -), Nev. State (pres. 1968-70). Clark County (pres 1965) elementary prins. assns., Alpha Delta Kappa Home: 2282 Capistrano Av Las Vegas. NV 89109 Office: 3620 S Sandhill Rd Las Vegas NV 89121
COBBS. PRICE MASHAW, psychiatrist; b Los Angeles. Nov 2. 1928. s Peter Price and Rosa (Mashaw) (Ab. L. Cal. Berkeley. 1953, M D . Mcharry Med Coll . 1958; in Evadne Priester. May 30. 1957; children Price P . Marion Renata. Intern San Francisco Gen Hosp. 1958-59, resident in psychiatry Mendocino State Hosp., 1959-61, Langley Porter Neuropsychiat Inst. pvt. practice psychiatry. San Francisco. 1962 Asst clin piuf. psychiatry L. Cal., San Francisco. 1966-67 Mein Dem. Policy Council. 1969 Pres. Pacific Tng Assos, San Francisco. 1966 Served with AUS. 1951-52 Mem. Nat Med. Assn.. A M.A . Am Psychial Assn , Inst, of Medicine of Nat Acad Sets.. Authors Guild Author Black Rage. 1968; The Jesus Bag. 1971. Office. 3528 Sacramento St San Francisco CA 94118
COBEY, JAMES ALEXANDER, lawyer, judge; b Frostburg, Md . Oct. 3. I9I3.S. James Carpinter and Elizabeth (Earle) C . student The Mercersburg Acad (Pa). 1928-30. BA. Princeton, 1934. siudeni Woodrow Wilson Sch. Pub and Internal Affairs. 1933-34, LL B Yale. 1938; student grad sch bus admmsirn Harvard. 1935-36, certificate of completion combined Yale-Harvard law bus course. 1938; m. Virginia Joy Branum, Aug 1. 1942; three children Hope Branum (Mrs Andrew W Batey). Christopher Earle. Lisa Elizabeth Admitted to D C. bar. 1939, Cal bar. 1947; review, field ally. Nai Labor Relations Bd- W ashingion. 1938-39. Los Angeles. 1940-41.46. chief research ally Cal. Cl. of Appeal. Los Angeles. 1946-48. asso justice. 1966 ; dcp. county counsel Los Angeles County. 1948. asso C. Ray Robinson law offices. Merced. Cal.. 1949-60. stale senator 24th dist Cal . 1955-66, sr partner Cobey A Adams. Merced. Cal. 1961-66 Mem. faculty Loyola I Sch Law. Los Angeles. 1948; mem Cal. Law Revision Column- 1957-66. Trustee. Wesiridge Sch for Girls. Pasadena Served to It USNR. 1942-46. Recipient Golden Gavel award. Nat. Coni Legislative Leaders. 1962. Mein Am Legion (past dist and post comdr ). Merced County (dir 1953-54). Merged (v.p 1953-54) chambers commerce. Cal Conf. Jr. Bar Meins, (v p 1947), P T A. (lifetime mem ). Sociadade Espirito Santo Democrat Episcopalian (past vestrymen) Home 560 S Orange Grove Blvd Pasadena CA 91105 Office: 217 W 1st St Los Angeles CA 90012
COBLE, HOWARD MELVIN, educator; b Longview. Wash . Jan. 13. 1925 s Henry N and Hattie (Neubauer) C. B A (Munson scholar), Central Wash Stale Coll , 1950, M F.d . I Wash . 1961. Ed D . Columbia. 1969; in Marilyn Jean Ness. June 13, 1948. children Robert, Janet, lisa Tchr. loppenish. Wash. 1949-50. Edmonds. Wash . 1951-53; prin . Edmonds. 1953-61 dir elementaly edn. 196167. 68-69. supt schs, Snohomish. Wash. 1969 ’J. Olympia. Wash, 1973 . dir Am Nat Bank Edmonds Cons interim com. on edn Wash State Legislature, 1969 . chmn slate duumv com on sch finance, 1971 . chmn com on study quality < . V. . . ... mxi c..„ .. ,o. Al X
Delta Pi Rotarian (v.p ). Horne 3003 Sherwood Dr Olympia WA 98501 Office 1113 Legion Way Olympia WA 98501
COBLE, ROBERT BENDORF, elec, engr; b. Blairsburg, la . July 19, 1923; s. Harry John and Genevieve Bertha (Bendorf) C ; B.S. in E.E., 1949; postgrad. Syracuse L'., 1950-51, la State U- 1953-56; m Alice Virginia Davern. May 14. 1947; children Mary Susan. Robert Bendorf, Barbara Ann. Products engr Sylvania Electric Products Co . 1949-52; project engr. Collins Radio Co, 1952-58; program mgr Polaris Fuzing System Avco Corp.. 1958 63; mem tech, staff Aerospace Corp., 1963-66; sr. engr./scientist McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Co., Huntington Beach, Cal., 1966 Lcctr acrospa safely U. So. Cal., 1968-71. Served with AUS. 1943-46 Registered profl. engr.. Cal. Mem. I.E.E.E., Nat., Cal socs. profl. engrs . Ass-. Old Crows. Patentee in field Home: 5504 Mountain View St San Bernardino CA 92407 Office: 5301 Bolsa St Huntington Beach CA 92647
COBLEY, GEORGE GORDON, physician, assn ofcl.; b Sui . s Wash.. Aug 6. 1919; s. William Henry and Anne (Myers) C;H S.I Wash., 1941; M.D , Columbia. 1944; in Mildred Overheu, Muy 16. 1946; children- George Gordon 11. Candice Ann Intern King County Hosp., Seattle, 1944-45. resident pediatrics Childrens Hosp.. Los Angeles. 1945-47; practice pediatrics. Santa Monica. Cal.. 1947 ; clin. instr, pediatrics U. Cal. at Los Angeles Seii Medicine, 1954-62, asst. clin. prof, pediatrics, 1963-66. clin. prof, pediatrics. 1966- . Mem Optimist Internal. 1948 v.p 1959-60. intern pres.. 1963-64. Bd dirs. Boys Clubs Santa Monica. Santa Monica Community Chest. Served to capt.. M.C., AUS. 1951-53. Named Young Man of Year. Santa Monica, 1954 Fellow Am. Acad Pediatrics; mem. Los Angeles County Med. Assn. (v.p. Bay Dist br. 1962), A M.A., Delta Upsilon. Home: 947 20th St Santa Monica CA 90403 Office: 2021 Santa Monica Blvd Santa Monica CA 90404
COBURN, DEAN FREDERICK, cons engr. b Newport. Vt., Dec 12, 1914, s. Fred Herrick and Bernice S. (Jones) C.; B.S.. U. Vt.. 1936, M.S., Northeastern U-, 1956; m. Eleanor Burnett Laing. Jan. 15, 1938 children Margaret (Mrs. Robert DeRoche), Jean (Mrs. Dennis Erickson), John F. With Vt. Hwy. Dept., 1936-38; jr. engr. Corps of Engrs., Providence. RI- 1938-41; hydraulic engr. Corps of Engrs.. Boston. 1946; project engr. Metcalf & Eddy. cons, engrs.. Boston, also Palo Alto, Cal., 1950-56. project mgr., 1956-65. partner. 1965—, v.p.. 1967—, regional v.p.. 1970—. Served to capt. major. AUS. 1941-46 Registered profl. engr. Cal. and 14 others. Diplomatc Am. Acad. Environmental Engrs. Fellow Am. Soc. Civil Engrs.; mem. Am. Water Works Assn., Am. Pub Works Assn.. Soc. Am. Mil. Engrs., Waler Pollution Control Fedn., Boston Soc. Civil Engrs. Home: 734 Seminole Way Palo Alto CA 94303 Office: 1029 Corporation Way Palo Alto CA 94303
COBURN, HORACE HUNTER, educator; b. Cambridge. Mass., May 10. 1922; s. Charles A. and Viola (Hunter) C . B.S.. Ohio Slate U.. 1943. M.S., U. III., 1947. Ph D., U. Pa.. 1956; m. Hope Betti Plcyl, Dec. 24. 1947. children—Lynn Louise. Carol Ann. James Hunter. Jr. physicist Manhattan Project. Oak Ridge. 1944-46; asso prof. Moravian Coll.. Bethlehem. Pa.. 1950-51: prof N M. State U.. Las Cruces, 1954- ; pres. Las Alturas Devel Corp . Las Cruces, 1970-72; cons. U.S AID. India, summers 1966. 69. Mem. Am. Phys. Soc.. Am. Assn. Physics Tchrs- Optical Soc Am . A A. A S., Sigma Xi. Home: Box 906 Mesilla Park NM 88047 Office; Physics Dept NM State U Las Cruces NM 88003
COCHRAN, BURT, advt. exec.; b. Metropolis. Ill- Feb. 5. 1898; s. William Phares and Sarah Effie (Jones) C- A B.. U. Kan., 1921. m. Jessie-Lee W'yatt. Jan. 14, 1922; I son. Burt. Ad writer, salesman Dallas News and Evening Jour.; asst advt mgr. Foreman & Clark. 1921. copywriter, account exec. Ferry-Hanley Advt. Co., 1922-26: account exec. H. K McCann Co (now McCann-Erickson. Inc.), San Francisco, 1926-27, mgr Seattle office. 1927-36. Chgo. office. 1936-38. mgr So. Cal operations. 1941-59; v p. McCann-Erickson. Inc- 1945-58. exec. v.p.. partner Stebbins & Cochran, advt., Los Angeles, 1958: partner McNeil. McCleery & Cochran. 1959-61; chmn bd. pres. Burt Cochran. Advt, marketing communications service. 1961- . Mem pub relations com Greater Los Angeles council Boy Scouts Am. Served as 2d II inf . U.S Army. World War I Mem Am Assn. Advt. Agys. (past dir. vice chmn. So. Cal chpi ). Conquisiadores del Cielo. Sigma N u. Alpha Delta Sigma. Sigrna Delta Chi Clubs Greater Los Angeles Advertising (past mem bd ). California. Men's Garden. Sales and Marketing Execs. (Los Angeles). Home 4415 Hobbs Dr La Canada CA 91011 Office 1010 S Flower Los Angeles CA 90015
COCHRAN, GEORGE WILSON, educator, b Topeka. July 7. 1919; s Charles Vernon and Faith (Hammaker) ( B S.. Kan. State I .. 1941. MS. 1942; Ph D . Cornell L , 194’. m Phyllis Louise Cole. Oct 23, 1943. children Patricia Elaine. Lois Beverly Post doctoral fellow Rockefeller Inst for Med Research. Princeton. N J . 1946-47; asso prof botany and plant pathology I lah State I . I ogan. 1948-55. prof, plant virology. 195^ taculty honor lcctr . 1963. Fulbright lcctr Netherlands. 1957-58. guest scholar lectr Grad Svh Kansas State U . 1964 Mem Am PhytupalhSoc (councilor 1963-64). Ain. Chern. Soc . Electron Microscopy Soc Am . Am Soc Microbiology. Ain. Inst Biol Scientists, A A A S . N Y Acad Sci. I lah Acad. Sci Ans and Letters. Sigma Xi. Phi Kappa Phi. Gamma Sigma Delta. Alpha /eta. Home. 991 Sumac Dr Logan LT 84321
COCHRAN, WILLIAM MORGAN. JR- advt co exec, b Parkersburg W \ « . Nov. II. 1934. $ William Morgan and Frances (Burn Field) C . A B- U. Va . 19«i6. M A . W Va I . 1958. postgrad (' Pitts. 1960-64 Instr, psychology I Puts. 1960-04; sr. psychologist, market research Pillsbury Co . Mpls 1964-68. exec y.p. Tele-Research. Inc . Los Angeles 196x ; dr W rtl J Jciissen. Inc Cons Los Angeles County Sheriff's Dept . 1970-’5 Mem. Am Psychol Assn . A A A S . Am Marketing Assn . Sigma Xi. Psi 6 hi. Sigma Alpha Epsilon Episcopalian Home 412 Shirley P Beverly Hills CA 90212 Office: 545S Wilshire Blvd Los Angeles C A 90036
COCHRANE, CH ARLES GRIFFITH, experimental pathologist; b Oakland Cal. July |9. I >) <0. - Eric William and \delaide (Grtffi' r C BA. I Rochester. Ivs | MD. 19^6. in Vitica Milbank, beb 21. 1953, children Althea Warren, Caroline Borden, Ln ■ ■ Griffit‘i Saiah Mellon S,aifv fellow I Puts- 1956-60 research tc dept microbiological chemistry. Insiitut Pasteur Pans, France .9v. asst prof I Pills Sch Medicine. 1960-61. asso do’i - expd pathology. Scripps Clinic and Research Found La 1 l.>. 1 •<' 1961-64 asso mem. 1964-67 nU-m I9n 1 sia’-'lnhcd
investigator Helen Hays W'hitnev Found 1964-69 Recipi Davis experimentalpalhologv a*aid. Hr-). ILmie 2411 \ aLc. । i Jolla CA 92037 Office 4?6 Prospect S| I .I i..da < a 92 11’
COCKING, ALBERT U.RAOY v ex K
Sept 30. 1926. s Albert Verrum and Lila Mac iW j- > c ' .Ur, ' John Mui: Coll.. 1946-48 I (. at al Los Angeles 49 v H.I... x.«.v tn mv ■ Ivi.o... u.i . • v m . v
see his parents, and he always come bv the campus to take a stroll or to attend a play in the Bayley Theatre.
“The campus is just beau’iful. its
After his graduation, Cobain earned a degree from the graduate school of business at Northwestern
First UNLV Graduate Now Deals In High Finance
Fifteen years ago Jon Cobain stood up before a sparse crowd in the campus gymnasium, walked over to where the dean was standing and curled his fingers around the first bachelor's degree ever conferred by the Southern Regional Division of the University of Nevada.
“They let me go up first because I was the president of the senior class," Cobain said in a recent interview.
“There were 29 of us in graduation robes there, and the basketball hoop shows up in all the photographs.”
UNLV's first graduate has done all right for himself. He’s 36 now, living in i San Francisco suburb and involved in what can only be called high finance.
“My specialty is mergers and acquisitions — I help people buy and sell companies,” he says. "Clorox was one of our major clients last year, and I bought a $30 million company for them.”
In fact, the management consulting company that Cobain started with a partner seven years ago was involved in transactions of more than $100 million in 1978.
“Last year was a good year, let me say that," he says. “But I’m going to start buying a few manufacturing companies for myself now instead of for other people.
“My aspirations are to build up some substantial net worth.”
I It’s a far cry from his days at UNLV when Cobain toiled as a janitor at a junior high school and as a truck driver for a water softener
company to get through school.
His major was economics, and he remembers especially two “outstanding" professors who helped to mold his future.
One was Dr. Andre Simmons, who still serves on the economics faculty; the other was Dr. Robert Rieke,
professor of finance who retired two years ago.
“It was such a tiny place, everybody knew everyone else,” he says. “There were three buildings, no landscaping, and Maryland Parkway was absolutely undeveloped from Sahara to the university. When it rained we had to detour several miles because the streets were so flooded."
Cobain remembers that the annual bonfire was the big social activity of the year, a traditional event that has
for the place at the time. Tumbleweed Tech and Parasite University, which was a play on the word Paradise. But we felt more kindly toward the place than the nicknames would indicate."
University, attending on a scholarship.
During the ensuing years, he learned the art and science of'finance by working for several of the world’s leading conglomerates.
Following a stint with International Harvester at Chicago, he spent 18 months in Venezuela introducing such products as gypsum wallboard
into South American and African markets.
Returning with a fluent command of Spanish, he joined Cosmodyne Corp., a “mini-conglom. as they say in the trade." working with liquified gases and other products with the Lear Siglier Corp, and a few months with Imperial Oil in Southern California.
He’s also been involved with oil and gas producing fields in East Texas and a commercial office building in Louisiana.
Life with Jon Cobain is business trips, hotel rooms and long telephone calls, he says.
But it is also piloting multi-engine airplanes, and plenty of tennis and
amateur photography
He visits Las Vegas frequently to
I
amazing what's happened to the place.”
Almost as remarkable as what’s happened to Cobain.
ILV Graduate Buys,
Sells Companies In Bay Area

Fifteen years ago, Jon Cobain stood up before a sparse crowd in the campus gymnasium, walked over to where the dean was standing, and curled his fingers around the first bachelor’s degree ever conferred by the Southern Regional Division of the University of Nevada.
“They let me go up first because I was the president of the senior class,” Cobain said in a recent interview. “There were 29 of us in graduation robes there, and the basketball hoop shows up in all the photographs.”
UNLV’s first graduate has done all right for himself. He’s 36
years old now, living in a San Francisco suburb and involved in what can only be called high finance.
“My specialty is mergers and acquisitions — I help people buy and sell companies,” he says. “Clorox was one of our major clients last year, and I bought a $30 million company for them.”
In fact, the management consulting company which Cobain started with a partner seven years ago was involved in transactions of more than $100 million
Grad
Expectations
First alum earns degree of success
By Mark Hughes
in 1978.
“Last year was a good year, let me say that,” he remarked. “But I’m going to start buying a few manufacturing companies for myself now instead of for other people. My aspirations are to build up some substantial net worth.”
It’s a far cry from his days at UNLV, when Cobain toiled as a janitor at a junior high school and as a truck driver for a water softener company to get through school. His major was economics, and he remembers especially two “outstanding professors who helped to mold his future.
One was Dr. Andre Simmons, who still serves on the economics faculty; the other was Dr Robert Rieke, professor of finance who retired two years ago.
“It was such a tiny place, everybody knew everyone else,” he recalled. “There were three buildings, no landscaping, and Maryland Parkway was absolutely undeveloped from Sahara to the university. When it rained we had to detour several miles because the streets were so flooded.”
Cobain remembers that the annual bonfire was the big social activity of the year, a traditional event that has been extinguished by the pollution laws. He also recalls his days as a senator in student government and the $15 he spent for posters in his successful campaign for senior class president.
"We had a couple of nicknames for the place at the time. Tumbleweed Tech and Parasite University, which was a play on the word Paradise. But we felt more kindly toward the place than the nicknames would indicate.”

After his graduation, Cobain earned a degree from the Graduate School of Business at Northwestern University, attending on a scholarship. During the ensuing years, he learned the art and science of finance by working for several of the world’s leading conglomerates.
Following a stint with International Harvester in Chicago, he spent 18 months in Venezuela introducing such products as gypsum wallboard into South American and African markets.
Returning with a fluent command of Spanish, he joined Cosmodyne Corp., a “mini-conglom, as they say in the trade,” working with liquified gases and other products. Then it was a year in aerospace products with the Lear Siglier Corp, and a few months with Imperial Oil in Southern California. He’s also been involved with oil and gas producing fields in East Texas and a commercial office building in Louisiana.
Life with Jon Cobain is business trips, hotel rooms and long telephone calls, he says. But it is also piloting multi-engine airplanes, and plenty of sennis and amateur photography
He visits Las Vegas frequently to see his parents, and he always comes by the campus to take a stroll or to attend a play in the Bayley Theatre.
“The campus is just beautiful, it’s amazing what’s happened to the place,” he remarks.
Almost as remarkable as what’s happened to Cobain.

2
First reunion attracts 200
Members of UNLV’s first graduating class returned to the campus for the Homecoming Week cocktail party and dance this past November.
The reaction of many was one of amazement at the University’s growth during the past ten years. Some class members saw their alma mater again for the first time since graduation; the campus they remembered was Grant and Frazier Halls. Still others recalled taking classes in the basement of Las Vegas High School.
The cocktail party and dance was a combined effort of CSUN and the Hotel and Alumni Associations. The consensus of opinion of those attending the affair was that the sponsors and the party deserved great praise. The dance drew over 200 alumni which demonstrates the support for such continued tradition.
Following Friday’s celebration, the alumni journeyed to the Las Vegas Stadium to witness the bringing home of the Fremont Cannon as the mighty, number two-ranked Rebels defeated the Reno Wolfpack, 28-7 Seeing this traditional gridiron battle was another first for many members of the Class of ’64; UNLV’s football program originated in 1968.
CLASS OF ’64 HONORED — Members of UNLV’s first graduating class who attended the ten year reunion are from left, (front row) Raymond Rawson, Binnie Douglas, Theresa Drakulich, Betty Luttrell; (second row) Ron Hamilton, Mary McDorman, Phyllis Darling, Joanne DeCanio, Sharon Kemna; (third row) Arthur Harszy, Linda Fox, Joan Blair; (back row) Lewis Sonerholm, Dominic Daileda and Ron Johns.
Fred Albrecht, Director of Alumni Relations (right) presents a commemorative plaque to Jon Cobain, UNLV’s first studenthody president.
Bob Coffin, Alumni Association Past President, presents the first Distinguisnea Alumni Service Award to Governor Mike O Callaghan as University President Dr. Donald Baepler and Alumni Director Fred Albrecht look on.