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Mabel Hoggard: newspaper clippings and school records

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Information

Date
1918 to 1989
Description

Folder of materials from the Mabel Hoggard Papers (MS-00565) -- Personal papers file. This folder contains materials about Mabel Hoggard, including a Las Vegas Sentinel newspaper issue, newspaper clippings, a decree of divorce (Mabel E. Wims vs Irvin E. Wims), a memorial service program (Mabel Welch Wims Hoggard, March 10, 1905- May 31, 1989), and U.S. Congressional Records recognizing the achievements of Mrs. Mabel W. Hoggard. Mabel Hoggard's student records were not digitized per the Special Collections and Archives restrictions policy.

Digital ID
man000671
Details
Citation

man000671. Mabel Hoggard Papers, 1903-2011. MS-00565. Special Collections and Archives, University Libraries, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Las Vegas, Nevada. http://n2t.net/ark:/62930/d1t72bs98

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Digitized materials: physical originals can be viewed in Special Collections and Archives reading room
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OCR transcription
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English

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application/pdf

STARTING NEXT WEEK • RENO NEWS SECTION I LAS VEGAS SENTINEL
HOLMES-COO Y FIGHT POS
Page11
B AC HISTORY
0 TH
2 Las Vegas SENTINEL, Thursday, February 18, 1982
D @Drrofr ® 0 D@W
To Be Equal
TURNING THE CLOCK BACK PEOPLE,
PLACES.
and
POLITICS
by John E. Jacob
New Federalism is
such a nice sounding
phrase It is a shame to
point out that It Is just a
public relations term
for the old, long
discredited idea of
states' rights.
The President, in his
State of the Union ad•
dress, went whole hog
for his "New
Federalism" stopping
just short of making it
seem a panacea for
what alls America.
It is nothing of the
sort. Rather, the New
Fed er al i s m is a
prescription for inflicting
further misery on
the poor and for
splintering what ought
to be a national concern
with national
issues.
It all reminds me of
the tale of the emperor
who had no clothes. All
his sage advisors nodd-
A friend long•
distanced me the other
day and to his queery
"What's going on out
there ", my spontaneous
reply, even to
my surprise , was
" Frank Sinatra is in
town." I understood his
bewilderment when he
wanted to know what in
the devil was new or
unusual about that, par•
ticu arly when, in
r ons to the
u rstandable next
d to admit
Id ne r rr the
m m my life. 0
a few years a o
d fr end un
1 v t d me to a
atra b ay party
that apparently ad
n oin on at th
ed their heads and
agreed with the
emperor that his new
suit of clothes was
beautiful. But when the
emperor ventured outdoors,
It was a small
boy, who had no illu•
slon and no need to
curry favor with power,
who shouted that
John E. Jacob
the emperor had no
clothes on.
So it is with the New
Federalism, a plan that
strips the clothes of
decency from national
life. The seductive idea
of transferring pro-
,.
Alice
Key
Sands Hotel for a couple
of days, but my instl
nct told me the
honoree was not likely
to be there, so I passed.
Since that telephone
call, I've given considerable
thought to it
and I really don't know
why Las Vegas enjoys
an all-en compa ssing
feeling of well-being
when the Chairman of
the Board is here weaving
his singular brand
of magic Certainly a
pa t of it is due to the
demonstrated and
uch ppr c a fact
th enc he
City · for the
economy
i tangible han th t
ybe it is p Ide
See Key P e I
grams and powers to ·
the states Is a nonst
a rte r. Those programs
and powers
came to Washington
because of state
abuses and turning
them back to the states
is bound to lead to
new abuses.
The New Federalism
was a mistake when it
was limited to packaging
various federal
the Administration
acknowledge that care
for the elderly is a
federal responsibility,
while care for younger
people is a state one?
What makes Medicaid,
a health plan for the
poor, a federal respon•
sibilty while welfare
and food stamps
become a state respon•
sibility.
The conceptual flaw
'
.By Joe Neal
I dreamed the other night at about dusk
How some brothers got together and tried to
control all of us.
A funny preacher and a man called Bus
They, their friends and relatives I will never trust.
Encouraging their wives and their ladies
To vote for Laxalt, List and Reagan, calling them
their team for the nineteen eighties.
John E. Jacob is President Of
The National Urban League
Telling their folks they cannot understand the
people's mood,
Nor the rumbling of the garbage cans as people
search for food.
health and social
welfare programs into
block grants to be administered
' by the
states. The new plan to
turn basic survival programs
like welfare and
food stamps to the
states promises nothing
less than a disaster.
Logic is missing
from the plan: why does
behind the New
Federalism is the idea
that local governments·
can best deal with local
problems. But poverty
is not a local problem;
it is national.
Fully federa I izi ng
welfare would
acknowledge that. It
would recognize that
See Clock, Page 14 •
Who gave them the right to control our pllght?
To rob us of our dignity like a thief in the
darkness of night?
Not a leader of the community that they make,
Their idea of progress is the number of white
hands they shake.
Their boasting can be heard on Sundays and
other weekend hours
Lacking in understanding of the meaning of
power,
Seeking to perpetuate all of the old wrongs
For they do not understand that they have
become the new Uncle Toms.
THE USES AND ABUSES
OF ANTI-COMMUNISM By Bayard Rustin
The South African
government has proposed
substantial new
curbs against jour•
nalists, both white and
black, in that country.
These curbs revolve
around the establishment
of a government
RUSTIN
body which would have
the power to lie nse all
journalists and to ban
them from writing art
cles for South African
periodicals. South
African officials claim
• tha uch a step is
necessary to counter
the threat of a "Soviet
•disinformation" campaign
aimed at the
"political and moral
subversion of the
white man."
These proposed
restrictions upon press
freedom in South Africa
are not merely unjust
and duplicitous; they
on the press. The Cape
Times declared that if
the proposal is passed
by the South African
Parliament "there will
no longer be a free
press in South Africa."
Even the right-wing
Johannesburg daily,
The Citizen has echoed
this view.
At the heart of this
threatens the country.
This argument may or
may not be correct. It is
clear enough that the
Soviets are seeking to
back certatn forces in
the region which, if vie•
torious, would impose
a tolalitarian Leninist
dictatorship on blacks
See Abuses, Page 14
Ra11ard Rustin i.-; Presid£111t Ernerilu.-;
of the .-t. [Jhifip Randolph Institute
and on e o/' lh<' /'ounders of th e
[Jroth erhood of Sleeping Car Porters.
Publlahed eve,y Tl'lu rS dly by GalM'f' Composition:
Inc ., 2450 lnduatriel Ad . las
Veg as, Nevada 1!1 9102 Belfy B r own ,
Publish«
are a clear and resounding
admission that
resistance and opposition
to apartheid rule is
gr'lwing within both the
black and white com•
munities in that
country.
The En,1 shlanguage
press in
South Africa has assailed
the government s attempt
to clamp down
undemocratic and
repressive South
African attempt to curb
press freedom is the
argument that Communist
subversion
Sub,;.crio1,on Ra1e bv Mail
Annually Only ~25 0C
All m.J•1 subscr,ohon~ musl b~ o.-,d •n
.adnnce- No refund'!,,
POSTMASTER. SPnd address chanq~,. 10
Lais Ve,qa :.en1,,,el 2450 nduSlfl,'11 A0,1d
Las V~qa\ N~vada eg 02
The views expressed on these editorial pages
a e those of the artists or authors indicated. Only
the one indicated as the Sentinel editorial
represents this publication.
Letters To 11 he Editor
Dear Editor:
THE MINISTERS ALLIANCE
INVITATION TO YOU
The Ministers Alliance of West Las Vegas is
having a casual fence mending banquet at True
Love Missionary Baptist Churh on February 24,
at 7:30 p.m. We hope to establish a better rapport
with our counterparts on the issue of Jobs and
Justice in Las Vegas. As a beacon in Las Vegas,
and the world, we ask that you be represented
and plan a three minute dissertation, as we
would .-like to meet and get to know you as you
will come to know the Minister Alliance first
hand.
President of the Minister Alliance, Reverand I.
W. Wilson, will open the banquet with a prayer.
The guest speakers will be Lovell Gaines, President
of the NAACP Local Chapter; Otis Harris,
Bob Bailey, Rev. Albert Dunn and James "Jimmy"
Gay. Entertainment will be provided by the
Queen of Gospel, Joyce Broussard, Ventriliquist
Robert Clan and a special salute to Sammy
Davis Jr., our Man of the Year.
We are having this banquet at True Love Missionary
Baptist Church in hopes that your visit to
the West Side of our town will dispel the myth
that all is lost over here. If you feel uncomfortable
in traveling to the West Side of town, we
have asked the police department for special
assistance that night. ·
There is a $6.00 cost per person to help defray
expenses and assist in the Ministers struggle.
Refreshments will be served. Your presence
would be greatly appreciated. We wou ld ap•
preciate your confirmation as soon as possible.
For ticket information call 648-3606 or
647-1864 or mail a check or money order to:
P.O. Box 3570
North Las Vegas, NV 89030
Yours in Christ
-- Minister Alliance
CONSUMER AFFAIRS
PROBLEMS
AND ANSWERS .
QUESTION: Under what conditions may a
tenancy be terminated with "cause" during occupancy
of a rental dwelling?
ANSWER: Tenancy may be terminated with
"cause" for:
1. Nonpayment of rent
2. Nonpayment of utility charges if the
landlord customarily pays such charges
and submits a separate bill to the tenant.
3. Failure of the tenant to comply with:
(a) Basic obligations Imposed on the
tenant.
CONSUMER AFFAIRS PROBLEMS is a weekly feature of
the LAS VEGAS SENTINEL and is prepared through the
cooperation of the Consumer Affairs Division, Nevada
Department of Commerce. If you have a consumer
problem; let us know. We will try to get an answer Addre$
S your card or letter to CONSUMER AFFAIRS
PROBLEMS, Las Vegas Sentinel, 2450 Industrial Road.
The Nevada Consumer Affairs Division is mandated to
enforce statewide the laws covered under the Deceptive
Trade Practices Act, the Automotive Repair Act and the
DoorTo Door Sales Act. The agency is designed to
protect and serve the needs of consumers and business
persons alike through its offices in Las Vegas and Carson
City.
Enquiries can be registered weekdays between 8
a.m. a;,~ !i p.m. by mail and in.person at 2501 E. Sahara
Avenue, Suite 304, Las Vegas, Ntfvada 119158 or br
phone Area Cod<t 70~-388-5293. · '
Las Vegas SENTINEL, Thursday, February 18, 1982
BLACK FIREFIGHTERS TO
HOLD CONFERENCE
The Professional sional competency;
Black Fire Fighters of cultivate and express
Las Vegas will host a goodwill and
regional conference of fellowship with each
the International other; promote profi-
Association of Black ciency of its members
Professional Fire and to protect them
Fighters on February from injustices in any
19th and 20th. The con- form; create a pleasant
ference will be held at atmosphere in the work
the Hacienda Hotel. environment and to this
The local chapter end they will accept no
has been a formal compromise.
organization since Officials from city,
November, 1982. This county and state
particular conference government will be in
will be strictly a attendence to welcome
business meeting for the conference
the 14 regional delegates. A luncheon
chapters. is scheduled for Satur•
The Southwest day, February 20th. The
Region is under the guest speaker will be
guidance of Mr. John William H. "Bob "
Wells, Sr. of Vallejo, Bailey who is the Ex-
California. Mr. Wells is ecutive Director of a
the Director with
Assistants Hersha! local development.
Clady of Los Angeles, cvo mpany here in Las
California and Rodrick egas.
Juniel of Denver, Col- The Black Fire
orado. Fighte r s will be
The members of the honored by the
I.A.B.P.F.F. have goals Westside Art Gallery at
of elevating moral, in• Paula's Palace on Frltellectual
and social day, February 19th and
status of its brothers also honored at Joe
and sisters; cultivate Ju Ii an' s by Henry
and maintain profes• Moore Productions. ;-------~--------,-----------------...... -, t DON'T MISS A SINGLE ISSUE! :
l Subsc,ibe To The Las Vegas Sentinel I
!I Pubfl•n.d anctMa11ed to you••-:~:! Frkley I't
la.enlhl $14.00
Il Laa y .... .... ,..... 1 Q'mont~ $25.00 200 ...,.triel __, 'I Nome__________lN_Y. _.._. .._. HI02:, I .,.____________ I
I Adckes, ! Oty,._ ____s tote Zi.,.p __ j
l My check for$ ___ is enclosed ~------------------------------~----
NAACP
3
MABEL HOGGARD MADE
HER MARK IN HISTORY
Mabel W. Hoggard
was born Mabel Welch
on March 10, 1905 to
Mr. & Mrs. Marshall
Welch in Pueblo, Col•
orado.
After elementary and
high school In Iowa,
she enrolled in the
University of Tennessee
at Nashville,
then known as Tennessee
A & M, where
she completed the Normal
Course for Teacher
Training. Upon graduation
she received the
highest position offered
the graduates • a
teaching principalshlp
in a two-room school in
th e coal fields of
Jenkins, Kentucy for
$100 per month. While
there she married Irving
Wims and had one son,
Charles I. Wims.
Three years later, the
then Mrs. Wims and
fa mily moved to
Wil liamson , We st
Virginia. During this
TbeLu
T,·1: .tH~-9!I0 7
" 24 50 Indu st rial Road "
period she received her
baccalaureate In
education from
Bluefield, West Virginia
State College and furthered
her education
doing graduate work at
Chicago University,
University of Utah and
the University of
Nevada, Las Vegas.
This was the era of
segregated schools
and Illy-white
primaries. When Mrs.
Wims appeared to
register to vote, a person
was heard to say
he sure hoped they
wouldn't take any more
" niggers" In the
Democratic Party. She
overheard him and promptly
became a llfe-
I on g registered
Republican. It was during
these days that
Mrs. Wims was told by
a sch ool jan itor to
" con tri b u te to t he
Democratic Party or
See Hoggard, Page 13
.,.. .. y,,_.,., ....... .
BETTY BROWN
Publisher & Editor
ED BROWN
Geni:,ral Manager
LeRoy Brown Adver11smq Director
Roos.e11elt fatzqer,1ld Ft>,1lure Ed1to,
Henry P MIIIPr S,1le$ Repre·,en1,111vfl
w,111~ Orown Pr oduction Ass1str1nt
.Meetings
The local branch of
the NAACP announces
t hat the Executive
Board meeting will be
delayed this month due
to various precinct
meetings, and the
General Membership
meeting will also be
delayed due to Valentines
Day. It will be
held at the regular time
next month in March.
GR CAREER TRAINING AND
On the Tuesday
before the second Sunday
in each month, the
Executive Board
meeting will be held at
7:30 p.m.
All NAACP members
and friends are urged to
attend the Southern
Area Conference to be
held February 19-21, at
the Marina Hotel, 3805
Las Vegas Blvd. So.,
Las Vegas.
A CHANCE TO TRAVEL THE WORLD.
Right now you can sign up for top
training in today's hot technologies.
T he Navy offers you sophisticated
train ing in fields like com puters. electronics,
and com munica tions. /\nd in
the ~avy you may travel to exotic
ports like Athens. Ha\\aii. Barcelonn,
Si ngapore, even H ong Kong. Sep if
you qua li fy fo r top tra ining and a
chance to travel t hP world .. call
your local Navy representative now.
NAVY. IT'S NOT JUST A JOB, IT'S AN ADVENTURL
Contact: NICK
Navy Recruiting Station
557 E. Sahara Ave.
Las Vegas, Nev. 891034
7021385-653:;
4
STATEMENT TO
SCHOOL BOARD FROM
TRUSTEE BREWSTER
On November 2, 1981, by majority votes, this
Clark County School District Board of Trustees
voted to support a nationwide search for the
best qualified candidate for the Superintendent
of our school district. As elected officials, we
were committed to initiate a fair and equitable
selection process. Our boys and girls deserve
nothing less.
During the past few weeks It appears that
several of my fellow board members, as well as
myself, have been challenged as the to integrity
of our intent to complete a legitimate nation•
wide search and selection process. People in
our community appear to feel that the thousands
of taxpayer dollars we have allocated for this
process is a scam.
Fellow board members, our individual integrl•
ty and credibility Is at stake. At this time we
must reassure the public that a Superintendent
has not been secretly identified; that deals have
not been made; that verbal commitments from
board members have not been secured.
I am wllllng to reaffirm my commitment to a
nation-wide search ending on February 16, 1982
and reassure the community that I am not
beholden to any local candidate. I feel confident
that each of you wlll want to reassure our public
at this time, as I have.
Virginia Brooks Brewster
February 11, 1982
HEATERS
ARVIN - MAIICEL - TITAN w SUPEIELECTIIC
At Phil'• , .. wlll find the la,..st
Mlectl• Lias Y•• of AulHNltlc
110-220 Volt Wall Portaltle
pin, hs f1111N1Ces, kerosene,
OllalNIDleMIFNIHNters.
PHIL'S SALVAGE, INC.
BUILDER'S EMPORIUM
1131 So. Main Street
382-7528 382-5004
Mon.· Fri. 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m.
Sat. 8:00 a.m . to 4:00 p.m.
Las Vegas SENTINEL, Thursday, February 18, 1982
ccso oBsERvEs BLACK ~==w=A=,r=,N =G==;;;;;;;i
HISTORY MONTH
The Black History
Community Extravaganza
will be held 'Feb.
17, at Las Vegas High
School Auditorium
at 7 p.m. for all
Clark County School
District students,
parents, staff and community
members. The
program includes cultural
dances, fashion
shows, speakers and a
tribute to out- standing
Las Vegan Jimmy Gay.
first black water safety
instructor in the nation;
the first black Executive
Board member
of the Culinary Union;
the first black to be
selected as Man of the
Year by the Las Vegas
Junior Chamber of
Commerce; and the
first black to be ap•
pointed as a state officer
by Governor Grant
Sawyer. He also
organized the first
Jimmy Gay
Gay, Public Rela• black National Guard
tions Officer at the unit in the State of
Aladdin Hotel and Nevada.
Casino and mortician Schools parat
Palm Mortuary, is a tlcipating in the interdedicated
civic worker com readings will pay
and promoter of events tribute to local black
for the Las Vegas black leaders including Jimcommunity.
A long time my Gay, Dr. James
resident, Gay is a McMillan, Sarann
former teacher and Knight Preddy, Stella
sports coach at Las Mason Parson and
Vegas High School. Mabel Hoggard, the
He has a series of first black school
firsts to his credit, in- teacher in Las Vegas.
eluding the first black KLVX-TV 10, the
to be employed by the public television sta-
C i t.y of Las Vegas tion owned and
above the janitorial operated by the Clark
level; the producer of County School District,
the first black beauty will receive a variety of
contest in the city; the See Hi·story,u Page 7
!;!.,,~ DEADLINES nu (Can You Meet Yours?) n WE CAN!!! u
n D&G Enterprises has full U production services:
• Design • Typesetting
• Layout and Paste-Up
• Camera Work n Whatever Yo ur Graphic Needs U D&G Enterprises Wo uld Like I The Opportunity To Serve Yo u
FREE PICK-UP & DELIVERY n
Call 385-7218 u
fi 1212 S EasternAve •LasVegas. NV 89104 n
l!,, H H H ,i Ha, w.dl
CHILDREN
This pretty elevenyear-
old black girl is
Sonya. She is in need of
a very unique family, for
Sonya is a child who re•
quires special care.
While Sonya is a
generous and loving
child, she functions in
the severe range of
mental retardation. She
attends a special
school and all her Instructors
report that
she Is attentive In what
she does. Sonya can
speak when she wants
to and is able to feed,
dress and groom
herself. She requires
minimum to maximum
supervision, depending
on the task she is
engaged in.
Sonya is attractive
and physically healthy.
She has some nears
I g ht e d n es s and
astigmatism, but does
not require glasses.
Sonya is a loner and
has a tendency to shy
away from others. She
is cooperative with her
elders and peers. It is
believed she should do
well in an adoptive
home with young
parents. Single parents
will be considered.
Much of Sonya's
future potential can not
be currently determin•
ed, but a loving and
secure family of her
very own would greatly
increase Sonya's
chances for improved
functioning and happiness
in the years
to come.
HOW YOU CAN
ADOPT
The children describ•
ed in this column are
waiting for adoption.
Some have
physical, mental or
emotional handicaps;
some are of mixed
racial back ground;
some are older; others
are siblings.
The Las Vegas
SENTINEL, working
with AASK (Aid to
Adoption of Special
kids) hopes to find
homes for these
children. AASK Is look•
Ing for people who can
give love and nurturing
to hard-to-place
children. Prospective
parents amy be single
or married.
If you'd like more in•
formation on how to
adopt a special chlld or
how you can help financially
support the AASK
program, please call
876-7420 or write AASK
Adoption Agency, 3305
W. Spring Mountain
Road, Suite 92, Las
Vegas, 89102.
Adoption Is a
specific legal matter,
and the Las Vegas
SENTINEL can answer
no questions concerning
the children.
Read
THE LAS VEGAS SENTINEL
Nevada's Largest Black
WEEKLY Newspaper
RADIO
1280AM
BILLIE ROWE'S
NOTEBOOK
DREAM GIRLS BATTLE
CRITICAL NIGHTMARE
NEW YORK CITY -
Dream Girls, which
. stood the critics on
their adjectives in
Boston danced into a
tougher write hand with
it's opening on Broad•
way, just before
Christmas. Despite the
tempo of the season, it
got no critical peace,
nor printed goodwill
towards its spotlighted
action. The old line first
night critics literally
nailed this Michael
Bennet ~ production to
the cross. However,
without seeing it, and
after reading the accolades
heaped upon it
during its on the road
run in Boston, this
scribe felt strange that
there could be such a
reversal of opinion in
the New York corridor
of the Eastern
Seaboard. Perhaps the
generation gap grabbed
the old line critics
who are bogged down
by their self•made
criteria of what should
be on the Broadway
stage and to whom
changes come so hard
and are unacceptable.
So rather than get
caught upon that age
trap I sent my young
thinking special asst.,
Nancy Hite, to the battlement,
and as expected
her enthusiasm
belied all the
negativism of the daily
print and electronic
critics. It is interesting
what she had to say
and I quote: "The cast
is so talented and attractive
that they could
just stand on the stage
and get applause, but
they don't just stand,
they work, and because
they work this show
should remain on
Broadway for a long
enough run fOf all the
habitues of the legit
theatre to see. The sets
by Robin Wager and the
costumes by Theoni V.
Alredge are worth the
3-mil., producer/director/
choreographer
Michael Bennett spent
on them. It is first class
entertainment. The
kind ~n entire family
can enjoy.
"Ben Herney, the
male lead, is excellent
as an ambitious and
ruthless dream-maker.
One who captures you
in his dream for success.
You find yourself
routing for him in the
beginning, and despising
him in the middle
act and pitying him in
the end. Jennifer Holi•
day, brought to New
York to star in Vinette
Carroll's "Your Arms
See Rowe, Page II
BLACK HISTOR.Y TALENT
SHOW
Th ursday, February 25th
6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p. m.
at
Flamin o Library Auditorium
The show exposes local talent in the
community. he junior division features
children and teenagers, and the senior
division features all who are 18 or over.
The winners will be featured on a local
television program, and agents who are
looking for ?rofessional talent to promote
will be n the audience the night of
the talent show.
The admission is FREE OF CHARGE.
Don't miss i t! For further information,
call 382-1290 (evenings only)
Las Vegas SENTINEL, Thursday, February 18, 1982 5
THE Star
By Betty Brown
He begins his show
with no introduction,
no fanfare.
You Under My Skin".
From the very first note
the audience seems
mesmerized.
CHOREOGRAPHER SOUGHT
FOR SECOND ANNUAL
SHOWCASE
As his comedian
leaves the stage, the
star sort of melts out
from amongst the
members of the orchestra
as they strike
up the intro for his
opening number.
The first song always
has an upbeat swinging
tempo, like in "I've Got
What is there about
this guy anyway, one
might ask. He's small
in stature, though a little
portly now that he is
older. Yet, the ladies,
especially the middle•
aged ones, attest to his
ever-increasing sex appeal.
His attire is Im-
See Star, Page II
In preparation for the
local celebration of NA•
TIONAL DANCE WEE~
'82, the Dance Division
of the Allied Arts Council,
in co-operation with
the City of Las Vegas is
.accepting applications
from local choreog
raphers for particit
icipation in the
Second Annual
CHOREO,GRAPHERS
SHOWCASE. The per-
RCA RECORDING ARTIST
formance will be given
on Saturday afternoon,
April 24 in the
Charleston Heigf}t~
Arts Center Theatre'.
Local choreog•
raphers wishing to submit
one piece of their
work for the event
should plan to attend
the next Dance-Dlvit
sion meeting on Sun-
See Showcase, Page 6
THE MAIN IN REDIENT ....it•~•
Featur ing CUBA GOODING
First T im e Ever To Appea r In Las Vegas, Singing:
" Their Million Sellers"
• Everbody Plays The Fool • Just Don ' t Want To Be Lonely
_---.;:;- • Catchln The Fever • Ready For Love
~ J>-O;~_,- -T HEIR NEW SMASH - ~ G_~:..:-~
1.,1\Jt:. :c.i:.~ • I Only Have Eyes For You sy;~tl'-~
__.;;---- Also Appearing L.S. MOVEMENT
ONE NITE O NLY "'BY SHOWS ONL y ·•
Friday February 26th 1982 (1st Show 10:00 PM) (2nd Show 1 :00 AM)
Donatio n I st Show · $ 7 50 2nd Show $IO 00
Tic ket Locations Oddessy Recor ds Tower Records, The Record Shop , KCEP Radio, Joe Julian s [, Ha,r (Jnlrrrnlt•d
Joe Julian's Restaurant• 3301 Spring Mountain Road• Reservations & Information 873-8006
KCEP Phone 647-2921 A POSITIVE FORCE PRODUCTION
6 Las Vegas SENTINEL, Thursday, February 18, 1982

£17t11t1111
LISTEN TO 1'••· 88.1
-~ ON YOUR FM DIAL
WE ARE PLAYING THESE February 19 • 25, 1982
1. I AH LOVE - PEABO BRYSON
2. CON FUNK SHUN 7 - CON FUNK SHUN
3. YOUR WISH IS MY C0'91AND - L~KESIDE
4. THE POET - BOBBY WOMACK .
5. BLUE JEANS - CHOCOLATE MILK
6. GET AS MUCH LOVE AS YOU CAN - JONES
GIRLS
7. No~ER TOO MUCH - LUTHER VANDROSS
8. C~TROVERSY - PRINCE
9. NIGHT CRUSIN - BARKAYS
10. SKVVLINE - SKYY
II. RAISE - EARTH, WINO, & FIRE
12. FREE TO BE ME - JOHNNY BRISTOL
13. LOVE IS WHERE YOU FIND IT - WHISPERS
14. MORE OF THE GOOD LIFE - T.S. MONK
15. THE NICK STRAKER BAND
ELL ME TOMORROW - SMOKEY ROBINSON
IGOLO - MARY WELLS
IAKE UP YOUR HIND - AURRA
HAT GIRL - STEVIE WONDER
EEL IT - LEONARD SEELY'S HERITAGE
F YOU COME WITH ME - DUNN & BRUCE ST
OHE LET ME LOVE YOlf - JEANETTE LADY DAY
ELP JS ON THE WAY - THE WHATNAUTS ·_;
0 GLAD YOUR MINE - TONY TROUTMAN
ENIUS OF LOVE - TOM TOM CLUB
ALBUMS
16.
17.
18.
19.
20.
21.
22.
23.
24.
25.
26.
27.
28.
29.
30.
SHOWTIME - SLAVE
LOVE MAGIC - L.T.O.
JAM THE BOX - BILL SUMMERS
BODY TALK - IMAGINATION
WATCH OUT - BRANDI WELLS
GET ON UP - SUZY Q.
ELECTRICITY - YATES BROS. & SISTER
THE MANY FACETS OF ROGER - ROGER TROUl'IAN
NEW YORK CAKE - KANO .
SOMETHING SPECIAL ANGELA BOFILL
SOMETHING SPECIAL - KOOL & THE GANG
CENTRAL LI NE
WANTING YOU - STARPOl~T
JUST LIKE DREAMIN - LENNY WHITE
KEEP ON COMING - JEAN KNIGHT & PREMIUM
SINGLES
YOUR THE ONE FOR ME - D'TRAIN
STAGE FRIGHT - CHIC
I CAN'T GO FOR THAT - DARYL HALL & JOHN OATES
MY GUY - SISTER SLEDGE
YOU ARE THE ONE - AM/FM
SIGNS OF THE TIMES - 808 JAMES
TAKE IT TO TOP - MERGE
MUST BE THE MUSIC - SECRET ~EAPON
IF YOU LOVE - BRENDA. RUSSELL -
SPECIAL TO ME - PERRY & SANLIN
SHOW
(from page · 5.)
day. Feb. 21 at 1 p.m. in 1
the Allied Arts Council
office at 420 S. 7th St.
11111..
At this meeting, a brief
outline of the work
should be submitted
including the
choreographers name
the title length of the
dance, the style of
choreography and
number of dancers in-
11Gi5i=i:==C>c;;;;;;;;;;;wii!5]~1t:5i!N=T!5JE" 'o;Gi!iiiil5!i!i E!C JIG!ii=E=i
B B I Dancers Musicians I . Actors Comedians
e Models AIITypesOfVarietyActs e I If You Have A I 0 Good Or Unusual Act el
ffl You Would like To Showcase,
ffl Send Resume To:
B m I D & G Enterprises I a~- 1212 South Eastern Avenue a1•
Las Vegas, Nevada 89104
Or Call: Dianne Fontes IB B 702/385/7218 I
l:JGiiS:==JEG:==i=lSIEii:==JEGiiiiiEiiilEl==Si:JB
volved, the technical re•
quirements for the per•
formance of the dance,
and a brief, descriptive
narrative of the
choreographer, including
previo.us performances
given of the
submitted or any other
of the choreographers
work.
So as to encourage
the growth and
development of grass
roots, Individual
choreographic talent,
applications may not
be made on the basis of
reconstructing another
choreographers work,
and may not be made
as promotions for local
dance studios.
The originality and
artistic quality of the
entries will be determined
during a showing
of works on Sunday,
March 14 at 2 p.m. in
the LAS VEGAS
DANCE THEATRE
STUDIOS on Cheyenne
Road in North Las
Vegas. Any person
desiring application or
DANCE WEEK '82 information
may phone Pat
Gaffey at the Allied
Arts Council office,
385-7345.
Las Vegas SENTINEL, Thursday, February 18, 1982
CLARK COUNTY SCHOOL DISTRICT ACTIVITIES
Rancho High School Celebrates Black History Week
Pictured left to right are Cindy Parker, crowned Queen of the Black History
Week celebration at Rancho High School, and members of her court, Florence
Richburg, Elicha Varner, Tracy Hill, Annette Michelle Jackson, Deloris
Williams and Marie Allison.
CROWNED-Ron Townsend of the 5th Dimension (currently at the Tropicana
Hotel) crowns Cindy Parker the new "Black History Queen" at Rancho High
School during recent festivities.
CLARK COUNTY
COMMUNITY COLLEGE HOGGARD
NATURALIZATION Cake Decorating
COURSE TO BEGIN Course Offered
(•rompage 3)
lose your job." At that
time, Mrs. Wims a.nd
If you are a resident
of Nevada and planning
to take the Naturalization
test from the U. S.
Immigration and
Naturalization Service,
Clark County Com•
munity College is offering
the course "Citizenship
and You," from
March 8 to April 12,
1982 at Valley High
School.
The classes will be
held on Monday even•
ings, from 7:00 to 9:00
p.m. The instructor is
Elaine A. Mendonca.
The course is designed
to give a six week
overview on the basic
structure of the United
States and Nevada
government, and will include
history, government,
patriotic songs
and writings, and
voting procedures.
An ability to read and
write English is a prerequisite
for this course.
For further details,
call 643-6060, ext. 411
The expressions Mr. & Mrs. Onward Ab·
"drop flowers" and ington were colleagues
"spray flowers" take on in the Mingo county,
new meanings with the West Virginia school
special course being system. They lost their
offered at Clark County teaching positions for
Community College, not adhering to the
starting February 20. janitor's ultimatum.
The course is Begin- The other forty black
ning Cake Decorating, teachers contributed
and it will be taught by and kept their jobs.
Rosalie Wirtz, in the kit- Mrs. Wims (Hoggard)
chen of the College, was instrumental in the
Saturdays from 9 to 11 Abingtons moving to
:h;~gh ~~~:~;;,y19i2~ H I STORY
The course is designed
to give an introduction
to cake decorating
and the uses of basic
equipment.
Participants will
learn the art of making
borders, drop flowers,
spray flowers, sugar
mold baskets, filling
baskets with flowers,
and writing.
For further information
call
643-6060, ext. 411
( from page 4 )
programs in recognition
of Black History
throughout the month
of February.
Programs will explore
black musical
heritage, film contributions,
performances,
stage shows and include
biographical and
interview format
shows.
Las Vegas and their being
employed by the
school district. Both of
them retired. Mr. Ab·
ington died in 1976; Mrs.
Abington lives in North
Las Vegas.
After losing her
teaching position, Mrs.
Wims became the first
black regular writer for
the Williamson News
and became the first
black administrative
staff person for the
Williamson Housing
Authority. Subsequesntly,
she worked in
the State Republican
Party of West Virginia
and for national committeeman
and multimi
II ion a ire R.J.
Funhauser as
governess.
In 1944 Mrs. Wims applied
for a position with
the Los Angeles Housing
Authority and was
en route to that position,
when she stopped
in Las Vegas to visit her
only aunt, Mrs. mae
Harris. The aunt and
her husband, A.J. Harris
and a cousin,
Florence Elmore, persuaded
her not to go to
Los Angeles, but to apply
foremployment in
Las Vegas, IN early 1945
she started working as
secretary at the Jeffer•
son Ave. U.S.O., where
she remained until In
September, 1945 as the
first black teacher in
the state of Nevada.
This milestone in
history came about the
same time as Jackie
Robinson broke the color
barrier in professional
baseball. Just
as all black baseball
players since that
historic breakthorugh
owe some allegiance to
Mr. Robinson, so al
black educators In
Nevada have a deep
feeling of gratitude to
Mrs. Wims for completing
her probationary
requirement
which ultimately open•
ed the doors for others.
In 1947, the same
year that she recleved
her first uncondltlonal
ANNOUNCING THE
DOOLITTLE COMMUNITY CENTER
2nd ANNUAL BLACK
HISTORY ESSAY CONTEST
Open for Children
Ages 6 thru 9 and 10 thru 13
Essays may be written about any black
who has made a significant contribution
to American or world history.
DEADLINE FOR ENTRIES: February 26th
Cash Awards and Plaques -
3 winners in each category.
For more information
Call Wendel Williams, Coordinator -
386 IP"t
7

8
By RtHn;evell Fitzgerald
The half-way mark.
That's what the 1950's
were. Halfway through
the Twentieth Century.
During those years, th'e
country got out of
buckboards and into
automobiles. People
began using a two word
phrase which had not
been used before -
"hello, operator ... " The
Phenomena of pulling
on a small silver chain,
hanging from the
center of the ceiling,
and illuminating an entire
room, was baffling.
But, in half a century,
people got used to
those changes. · Those
technologies which
had been so perplexing
were finally either
understood or just
taken for granted.
By the time we arrived
at mid-century,
Americans were fairly
sophisticated. So much
technology had been
developed that there
were hardly any frontiers
left to be curious
about. But, like most
events, "by the time
you get to the end, the
end has moved again."
"Look. A shooting
star." It seems that,
once upon a time, when
such were observed,
the viewer would tightly
close the eyes and
DANIELS INCOME TAX SERVICE
Complete Tax Service
Personalized Service
Tax Planning - Tax Shelters
Prompt Courteous Service
306 E. Lake Mead Blvd.,
North Las Vegas
642-6672
Las Vegas SENTINEL, Thursday, February 18, 1982
make a wish. Pinocchio figured he could view were making 2 toy High School. Autherine
had made that a part of the film without the aid makers from California, Lucy had experienced
every child's dream of those special overnight millionaires similar problems at the
with the song "When glasses. Remember by buying $1.98 Unviersity of Alabama
YouWishUponAStar." him? hula hoops made as had other Black
During the 1950's, Alaska and Hawaii by Wham•O. students elsewhere.
however, shooting brought the number of New words appeared But then, When we
stars became UFOs. states in the Union to on the scene for those look at the 1950s for
The World entered the th fift mark during "in the know". "Fran• BI a ck p e op I e, i I
nuclear age with a bang thee wanYin g years o f t h e tic", "the most", "flip", becomes a horse of a
and didn't look back for· 1950s. More territory to "axe", "chick", different color in terms
a quarter of a century. protect. After all, Nikita "yo•yo", "drag", of the more positive
The songs of that Khruschev had promis· "wheels", "passion aspects of American
decade were repre• ed Americans that "we pit"' "chopping", life. We got the cars,
representative of an in• will bury you". And "du a Is", and the telephone and the
creasing interest in Americans had res• "hardeeharhar". The electric lights. But our
outer space. "That ponded by building big new word for the songs were different.
Lucky Old Sun", "How more fallout shelters. '50s, however, was Nat King Cole was
High The Moon", "Lit• Beatniks paid no atten• "Sputnik". 1957 sthineg ing P"lTaotote rYso un,g ",
tie Star", "Moonglow", lion to any of that. They On October 5, ,
"Venus" and dozens of were busy hanging the Russian newspaper "Twilight Time",
others pointed to the around coffee houses "Tass", reported that Johnny Mathis
stellar mysteries. The trying to sing the blues Sputnik . was in orbit. "Chances Are", and the
movies were no dif• and their versions of That event alarmed Four Aces - "Tell Me
ferent. Science fiction depression ballads. Ame re I cans. I I Why". The lyrics were
movies appeared on on college cam- shouldn't have. The not all that important
the scene in great puses, some young Russians had been - except when doing a
abundance and, on men were setting busy getting ahead slow dance, but the
November 26, 1952, the records for cramming whlle some Americans titles were prophetic.
first full-length 3.0 into telephone booths were holding other One would almost
movie was shown in and vw automobiles Americans back. Less believe that a
Los Angeles. It started and girls were pressing than two weeks earlier, soothsayer had looked
a whole new fad. With their crinoline slips, President Eisenhower off into the future. It
special polaroid tube and sack dresses had dispatched 1,000 was indeed "twilight
glasses, the space• and mixing and mat- paratroopers to Little time" for segregation.
ships seemed to leap ching "pop-it" beads Rock, Arkansas to pro- Each time that Black
out into the audience. for necklaces and tect nine Black people were told things
There was always some bracelets. Thirty students who had would be better, but
.______________________======="=to=u=g=h:": :::g::u:y:: :::w::h:o:: ::::m::i:ll:i:o:n;:s: ::o:f: ::A:m:::e;r;i;c;a;n;.s,. ... enrolled at Central that they would have to rt. ...............................................................................N ...-.:.;...,.;;.;.;.:.;;.;.;.;.:.;;.;.;.:.;.;:.:.:.:.:.;;.:.;.;.;;.;.;, :,;,1;;1;. ;;;I;Ca wait u nt i I the next : generation, they ·RIii Estate Is a· *
people lt.11i1ess
Here is ••• of the
people at Toler ·R ealty
I•
I
!Residential Income '
& j Land Commercial
John
Pitts
John brings to the real estate industry, a
background of mathematics. having been a
mathematics teacher for over 20 years. At
present, John is a teacher with Clark County
School District. IHe doubles as a residential
sales person with Toler Realty. John, his
wife and daughter arrived in Las Vegas from
, Gary , Indiana.
lJ.3
. : , wanted someone to f I "tell them why". They
: f felt the "chances" of
: tthings being better for
I ha\ ~ b~t·n dP\' n ali t ht.:' rn:uJ"i
,.. . .
The colored. negro. boy. nigger . black and white .
: But I lc a. rncJ ~ar!) in li fe :.• How to add man on the end of each road sign, .• .•
i :•
.•• •.
And that d""'" cd all prcJudi,c.
, ---------------------------------------------------------~, ' ' ,' Please send check or money order to: Poems by Brainard J.J . Hyson. , \
New Light Music and Publishing
1111 Las Vegas Blvd. 210A
Las Vegas, Nevada 89109
Name
Address
: • City State Zip
: I I
~them were "mighty
good" provided they
made things happen.
" See the USA in a
Chevrolet". So sang
Dinah Shore. Some
Americans were seeing
Yellowstone, The·
Grand Canyon, the
Painted;f)esert, Cyprus
t Gardens and all of the ! other wonders of ! I merica. They would
: sightsee and hike
: around and then they
• would check into the
• lodges, motels and
hotels for a little relaxation.
Black people were
not doing the former
and were not permitted
1 to do the latter. There
were never any rooms
at the inns for them
unless the inns were
Black owned. Pat
Boone sang, "Ain't
That A Shame".
: I I i ',, Enclosed is D check D money order for $6 .50. ,, I
i '---------------------------------------·-----------------' !
"Que Sera, Sera". So
sang Doris Day. Some
Americans were con•
ducting their lives in a
helter-skelter manner. ;... ................... NNHffNHHI ........ ................ Nl ..... n••••••••HH ...... ........
They did anything they
wanted to - the sky
was the limit. Black
people had not done so
before but they were
deciding, in ever increasing
numbers, that
they had nothing to
lose. They were going
to "risk it out" and if
that meant getting their
tickets punched, then
- the Weavers and
Gordon Jenkins sang, it
would just have to be
"Goodnight Irene". But,
if they attacked the problem
seriously, it would
be "Good-night Mrs.
Calabash, wherever
you are", to
segregation.
The 1950s were terrible
times for Black people.
A spectre of fear
seemed to prevail all
over. At a time when we
should have been
marveling at the
technological ad·
vancements being
made, we were being
forced to bear testa•
ment to the realization
that America's technology
had indeed
"outdistanced its moral
values".
In certain parts of the
country, Black people
nolongersatoutonthe
front porch of an even•
ing and the lights in
the front rooms were
never on. We trained
our ears to recognize
familiar sounding cars
and those which were
not, when they would
pass our homes, would
be investigated.
"Did you hear about
what happened in
Mound Bayou?" "Ain't
that a shame?"
"What's that bright
light over there in the
sky?" "It look like its
down around that shop•
ping center over on
Pine Street". "Hey Pap.
Wt,at's that light over
there?" "That's Nosser
City. Somebody threw a
bomb on It".
That scenario was
repeated dozens of
times throughout the
country. Somewhere
else it might have been
about Little Rock, Anniston,
Tampa or
Bogalusa. In Las
Vegas, people were
probably trying to
figure out what hap•
pend to Nat King Cole
that mid-July night in
1958, when he was
severely beaten. Who
did it? Why? What are
the police doing about
It? Local Black people
heard about it and they
talked about it. The
mob mystique played a
role. Not only were they
concerned about the
usual group of psychos
who were biting at t &
bit to make an example
of any Black people
who " got out of line"
but they were also
aware of the extremes
that certain elements
within the gaming industry
would go to protect
their billion dollar
businesses from any attempts
by Black people
to become patrons. ..........................................:
i• ! • • • • i ,, • :nr\\1,, l :
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.: 10 a.m. Until Dusk ::
: CORNER LAMB & ALEXANDER : · I• 102-643-1334 •:
=······························.·.·J " ····
Las V.egas SENTINEL, Thursday, February 18, 1982
majority of those held
positions at schools on
the westslde. There
were very few in the
secondary schools. In
those rare instances
Perhaps it was that
which happened to Mr.
Murray of the burned
out vehicle found In the
desert.
Not everyone was being
beaten or killed.
Most were simply In•
timidated. The
economic "billy club"
was held over their
heads. They were to
either play ball or lose
their jobs. The Average
Black Las Vegan was
only earning a third of
what the average white
worker was earning.
There were no Blacks in
management or any In
the "front of the house"
jobs in the hotel industry.
The only exception
to that rule was the
occasional Black
porter. For the most
part, they were maids
and groundsmen.
Within the Clark
County School District
there were but a few
Black teachers. The
where such existed, the
teachers were Isolated.
James Hunter, who
was the first Black
teacher at Western
High School, was the
recipient of more than
his share of harrass·
ment. After just six
months on the job, he
had to face twenty of
his fellow teachers who
would determine his
suitability for remain-
'ing there. I am certain
that he went into the
hearing convinced that
he would receive a fair
hearing. So much for
pipedreams.
The movement was
underway. It gained
momentum with each
event. Previously, those
events as they happen•
ed to Black people
around the country, had
been kept secret.
Everywhere, everyone
had believed that those
atrocities were only
happening to them. The
miracle of television
changed ail of that.
White local newspeople
avoided reporting
the news as it pertained
to Black people, natl
on a I broadcasting
companies were not
quite as hesitant. As
more and more hit the
Professor
Fitz9erald is
director of ethnic
studies at
University of
Nevada-Las
9
national news, people
around the country
began to ask that
magic question: "are
things really that bad?"
They didn't know the
half of It then and
wouldn't believe It now.
WALLY'S
REPAIR-IT-SHOP
LAWN MOWERS• APPLIANCE
WELDING e SHEET METAL
Wally Walker
Owner
300 B E. Lake Mead
N. las Vegas, Nev , 89030
10
LAS VEGAS SENTINEL
SPORTS, GAMING, HORSERACING
LIGHTNIN' FINCH
SHOCKED BY
LEONARD
slow first round in
which he layed back
and studied Finch,
wastet no time in
finishing off his opponent
in the second and
third.
by LeRoy Brown Bruce Finch of Las
Vegas.
While backed into a
corner midway through
the second round,
Leonard fought his way
out with a flurry of punches
to Finch's body
which sent the
challenger backward.
Quickly Leonard followed
up with a combina-
Sparks flew briefly in
Reno Monday night as
World Welterweight
Champion Sugar Ray
Leonard successfully
defended this title with
a third round TKO of
third ranked 'Lightnin'
Fighting for the first
time since the
"showdown" at
Caesar's Palace
against Detroit's
Thomas "Hltman"
Hearns last September,
· Leonard, who after a
,-----bl-----.. ly'J
BOXING AT
TIIE ALADDIN!
Four other exciting bouts
S J\T FEB 27 Doors open 11:30 am
r\. I •, • First bout . noon
Aladdin Theater for The Performing Arts
Tickets: $50 - $JO - s20 - $tO
Tickets on Sale No~ at the Aladdin's Casino Cage
HOTEL & CASINO
Watch Us Grow
February 18, 1982
the count, Finch rose
on the count of nine.
When the resumed
fighting, Leonard again
unleashed a flurry to
the head and Finch
again fell, this time
face forward, his head
between Leonard's
feet. Getting up on the
nt of six, Finch managed
to finish out the
round.
In the third, Leonard
quickly landed punches
blood from Finch's
mouth and buckling his
knees. After another
flurry, Finch again went
down and again as he
staggered to his feet,
referee Mills Lane stopped
the bout at 1:50 of
the round.
Leonard admitted
that he was sluggish in
the first round, and said
that he was ready when
the bell sounded for the
NEVADA'S LARGEST AND
MOST COMPLETE BLACK
tion to the head, which
dropped Finch to the COMMUNITY NEWSPAPER
canvas. Barely beating - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
I.
\I :
,1 • I
; , I
' February 24 · XIND
MAIN EVENT
vs.
PETE SEWARD
Dayton
1 O Rounds, Heavyweights
EDDIE WILSON
vs.
ROCKY YOUNG
Four Other Fights on the Card
Doors Open 7:00pm Fights start at 8:30pm
Prices: $15.00 Reserved $10.00 Gen. Adm.
;\ F ',\: I I ,I ,, ' I
1'' I 1' ' '
' .
Las Vegas SENTINEL, Thursday, February 18, 1982 11
ROWE--- STAR--------- very few singers around
whom one can hear in
concert today, go back
one week later (or even
one day later) and hear
an entirely new pro-
( frQm page :5)
Too Short To Box With
God, '' does a magnificent
job controlling her
incredible voice to prevent
over-powering the
others, but also an actress
whose facial expressions
can bring
tears to your eyes. Sans
B'way bias this should
be tbe beginning of a
long and successful
career for her."
"When you add
Herney and Holiday
with Loretta Devine,
who shared the stage
·with Greg Hines in
"Comin' Uptown," Ob·
ba Babatunde, who was
last seen on B'way in
"Reggae", Cleavant
Derricks, who like Holiday
was in "Your Arms
Too Short to Box With
God," and is also
credited with the vocal
arrangments for
"Dream Girls," Sheryl
Lee Ralph, who was the
star of "Reggae",
Deborah Burrell, last
seen in "Eubie" ' Von- die Curtis-Hall, who
was the Fly in the current
hit "Lena Horne: A
Lady And Her Music",
Tony Franklin, who has
several screen credits,
but is making his B'way
debut, and Davi-cl
Thome, who has played
the lead in the B'way
and national company
of "A Chorus Line", you
get a show that works
like a swiss clock. Even
though the book is a little
weak the cast lifts it
with spirit and magic -
and that is what show
business is all about.
Go see for yourself it's
made to order for the
Bro. and Sister's pride.
NEWS NOTES -
There appears to
be no silver lining on
the film horizon in the
pending confrontation
of the NAACP and the
MPAA. Even before the
tentatively scheduled
meeting between Jack
Valenti, its prexy, and
Geraldine Green, head
honcho of the Civil
Rights o rg.'s
Bev'Hills-H'wood
branch, the film org.
leader has pu bl icly
stated that the
demands of the NAACP
cannot be met because
of the very nature of
film-making. The
NAACP film city arm
has designed, and ex•
pects nat'I office approval,
an '82 movie
boycott that will go into
effect unless. there is
some real and
noticeable black participation
in front,
behind and in all other
working phases in the
whirl of make
believe ...
A£1\Ut]Q ~;-~ Register
To
Vote
(1rompage '6)
peccable, his grooming
immaculate.
His voice has lost
some of its resonance
and his upper tones are
sometimes a shade off
key. But his phrasing
and interpretation are
matchless. Yes, he can
sell a song like no one
else, and he makes
every woman feel that
he is singing especially
to her.
He is on intimate
musical terms with the
likes of Vincent
Youmans, the Ger•
shwins, Cole Porter,
Rogers and Hart and
Sammy Cahn. He has
swung with Count
Basie and the Dorsey
Brothers and Harry
James, and mellowed
out with Gordon
Jenkins, Victor Young
and Nelson Riddle.
HOLMES-COONEY
FIGHT POSTPONED
The March 15 WBC heavyweight title fight between
champion Larry Holmes and Gerry Cooney
was postponed Wednesday because of an injury
to Cooney's left shoulder.
The official announcement was made in New
York and a new date will be set for the bout
which in all likelihood will be held in mid-May i~
Las Vegas.
The new date is contingent on the progress
Cooney makes in recovering from his injury. If
the injury has not healed within about two months
the bout could be set back even further.
"It's pretty bad", said a highly placed source
referring to Cooney's shoulder. '
The multi-million dollar fight, scheduled at
Caesars Palace in Las Vegas, was jeopardized
~ver the weekend when Cooney stopped training
rn New York because of the shoulder injury suffered
Jan. II in preparation for an exhibition
against Joe Bugner of Britain. That match was
canceled.
EARL
SWIFT. SR.
C.heyenne Square Barher Shop
3250 C 1v 1c C ENT E R O R . . N. LAS VEGAS, NV 89030,..
642-9985
Having been known gram.
to sometimes turn conductor,
he once recorded
as a conductor of a
symphony orchestra, a
magnificent album tltl•
ed "Tone Poems of Color".
Yes, he's THE Pro.
THE Consumate Performer.
He is THE Star.
SINATRA! *******
He is suave and cool
as he swings ever so
slightly across the
stage singing "The
Lady Is a Tramp" as opposed
to tender and intimate
when he sits on
his stool center stage
and holds the audience
in the palm of his hand
as he sings Sonny
Bono's "Bang Bang".
He needs no props,
no chorus, no trio or
quartet and no dancers
to make his show an
event. He doesn't even
need an orchestra
(though he has sung
with every instrumental
combination imaginable,
from a full
symphony orchestra
down to a trio). He and
Tony Mottola's guitar
make beautiful music
together • just the two
of them.
His repetoire is unending.
He is one of the
. ..;.. ....
·-
,_ ••- • ~~1=.i1:1:,1,;i.... ........;. 1 ·-
THE TIFFANY AND SHOWPLACE
OF THE WESTSIDE COMMUNITY
E
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12 las Vegas SENTINEL, Thursday, February 18, 1982
Westside Beautification Protect Set
The West Side Commu
nlty Development
Commission, and the
Las Vegas Metropolitan
Beautification
Committee are sponsoring
their Third Annual
West Las Vegas
Home Beautification
Program. All home·
owners residing in
the area between 1-15
and North Highland
Avenue, and West
Washington Aven~e
and West Cary Avenue
will be ellglble to partic
Ip ate by slmply
registering at the West
Side Community Development
Commisssion
office, located at
330 West Washington
Avenue, Suite 11, or
calling the Commission
office at 647-2177.
The Beautification
Program will culminate
with a Gold Shovel
Awards Ceremony at
the Bethel Baptist
Church, located at
400 West Adams
Avenue at 11 :00 a.m.
on May 14, 1982.
Properties will be
judged on lawn and
shrubbery care, flower
garden arrangements,
exterior painting, and
overall general home .
preservation. Judging
of properties Is
scheduled to take \
place the week of
May 3, 1982.
THE LITTLE So says the VA ... :0:~"rHin
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Contact nnrut VA office
(check your phone book)
or a local veterans group-.
Used King & Queen Size
Mattresses & Boxsprings
from $49.00 per set
i
i .I ••• I

IIIIIIINN
i At the Lincoln Day Dinner held last Friday at
: Caesars Palace, County Commissioner i Woodrow Wilson was presented the "Jack of
i Hearts " Award. The award, given by the Clark f County Republican Womens' Club, was given In i honor of his service to his party and the state of
: Nevada. The award was presented by former Las i Vegas Mayor Oran Gragson. •:. .a. ..l NIIIF
i ..•:•
! .•••
.• .•• •. .•
Do you have a Tax Question? Send it to:
Thomas F. Hughes, c/o Las Vegas SENTINEL,
2450 Industrial Road, Las Vegas, Nevada 89102.
It will be answered In future columns of tire
SENTINEL.
(MARITAL STATUSAGE)
Marital status is
determined as of the 1st
day of your tax year·
(usually Dec. 31). You
are considerd 65 on the
day before your 65th
birthday. At age 65 or
over you can claim an
additional dependent
- you can claim 2 instead
of 1. If you are
single you must file a
return if you had gross
income of $3300 or
more for the year. The
requirement is $4300 if
you are 65 or older. If
married the figur is
$5400 combined i ncome
- $6400 if one
spouse is 65 or older -
$7400 if both of you are
65 or older. Even if your
income is less than fil•
tng requirement you
must file a return if you
owe any taxes such as
unreported tips. Self
. employed people who
made $400 or more
must file. If you do not
meet the earnings requirement
but income
tax was withheld, you
should file to get a refund
which Is due you.
You should file also If
you qualify for the earned
Income credit
regardless of the income
amount.
(SURVIVING SPOUSE)
If either spouse died
during 1981 and either
of you were required to
file, the surviving
spouse must file a
return unless an executor,
administrator or
legal representative
has been appointed.
Special benefits are
provided by law.
(SPOUSES WITH DI F•
FERENT LAST NAM ES)
This is acceptable ·o
the 1.R.S. Show (John
Smith AND Mary
Brown) proper names.
(PRESIDENTIAL ELEC·
TION CHECK-OFF)
By checking these
boxes you provide
$1.00 each for funding
candidates, this $1.00
does not come out of
your refund or add to
your tax bill. It Is a fund
to help candidates who
might not be able to run
otherwise.
Las Vegas SENTINEL. Thursday, February 18, 1982 13
HOGGARD------------- has given "my heart a
lot of swing" • a quote
friend, without my
knowledge (I've always
believed It to be
Dorothy Johnson ) clipped
out the story and
wrote to someone In
the Sinatra menage,
describing my anguish .
One day a special
messenger showed up
at my office with a
package for me. You
can imagine my joy
when I opened It to find
as fine a collection of
"Sinatra" as you could
wish for Including,
mind you, a copy of his
limited edition of "A
Man and His Music."
local authorltle!.
whereby all the bars
closed down at mid·
night. Imagine the rash
of "Breakfast Clubs".
etc. brougt on by that
little regulation. One of
the more popular such
clubs was called
"Backstage" and what
a swinging rendezvous
It was for show folk and
their following. If you
will pardor. the digression,
I recall an unforgettable
night when
"Nat "King" Cole, Art
Tatum and Errol Garner
(then almost brand
new) took turns at the
piano for nearly six
hours dispensing such
artistry that Is occasioned
only when great
artists are performing
for each other. Around
the comer from the
"Backstage", come-
(from page l )
contract to teach in the
Las Vegas School
District, Mrs. Wims
married J. David Hoggard,
Sr., a widower
with two sons.
During her twentyfive
years with the
District, Mabel Hoggard
taught at
Westside, Matt Kelly,
Higland and C.V.T.
Gilbert schools.
Hoggard was one of
the teachers to testify
in court supporting a n
integration plan for the
school district. Eva
Simmons, now and ad•
minlstrator for the
district, was the other
one. They were suppo
rte d by Bernice
Moten (Jenkins), then a
member of the School
Board of Trustees.
Along with other
members of the community
and teaching
profession, Mabel Hoggard
was highly Instrumental
In having a
lunch program
established In the
elementary schools.
In 1975 the Board of
School Trustees saw fit
to honor this pioneer
educator by changing
the name of the former
Bonanza Elementary
School to the Mabel
Hoggard School.
The number of
awards of which Mabel
Hoggard
has been the recipe attests
to the esteem in
which she is held by
her peers, former
students and the community
at large. The
capstone of these
recognitions was her
being chosen in 1977 by
the University of
Nevada, Las Vegas, as
one of the state's
Outstanding Citizens.
She received this great
honor along with
former Mayor Oran
Grayson and publisher
of the Las Vegas Sun,
Hank Greenspun.
After her retirement
in 1970, Mabel Hoggard
had been a volunteer
for many church, civic
and educational
endeavors. One of
these which she dearly
loved was working with
children and parents,
trying to teach them the
value of thrift by joining
the Westside Federal
Credit Union. Her suf•
faring a stroke in :::79
has forced a curtailment
of these activities.
In addition to all
members of her family
and particularly her
nine grandchildren, this
great teacher and
humanitarian lighted a
path for all Nevadans
to walk in and are
"proud that they did."
In addition to her
other experiences ,
Mabel Hoggard has
been a Program Director
for the Operation Independence
Day Care
Center and a First
Grade Teacher at the
Trinity Methodist
Church Day Camp
School. Her Civic and
Professional Activities
have Included membership
on the Executive
Committee of the Las
Vegas Community concert
Association and on
the Executive Committee
of the Southern
Ne·vada Teachers of
English and Foreign
Languages. She has
served as Secretary of
the Clark County
Chapter of -the
American Red Cross,
Treasurer of the Las
Ye gas Classroom
Teachers AssoclatlonSecretary
of Program
Material for the
Women's Society of
Christian Service, Zion
Methodist Church and
has served on the Ex·
ecutive Board of the
Las Vegas Branch of
the NAACP. She has
been a delegate to the
Nevada State Edcuational
Convention and a
delegate to the National
Educational Convention.
Mable Hoggard
Is a member of
Gamma Phi Delta
Sorority, a member of
the Republican Central
Committee of Las
Vegas, a Life member
of the National Education
Association, a
member of the League
of Women Voters, a
member of United
Church Women and a
member of the National
Retired Teachers
Association .
She has been cited
as Honor Teacher of
the Week by the Las
Vegas Rotary Club and
received the
Distinguished Service
Award in the Field of
Education from the
Clark County Teachers
Association.
KEY
because, as an integral
part of the growing and
the greening of Las
Vegas, Sinatra has
become the symbol, for
if what we sell as
"fabulous" Is, in fact,
really so, then, Sinatra
surely epitomizes It.
It Is simpler to explain
my personal reaction.
I am an unabased
Sinatra fan •· from the
earliest years when we
dubbed him the Crown
Prince during the
height of Bing Crosby's
illustrious reign.
Sinatra is an integral
part of my life -millions
of Sinatra fans know
what I mean. I haven't
f.een him perform for
years • can't afford him
since Corporate
America started mak•
ing Las Vegas show
room policy, but oh
what his music has
meant to me.
How do you evaluate
the contribution of an
artist who has brought
more pleasure to more
people over a more sustained
period of time
than any other? All I
can say Is that for many
many years, Sinatra
from Billy Holiday's
"You'd Better Go
Now."
Also, I like Sinatra's
style and even more,
his compassion for
people. There are
countless anecdotes
about Frank Sinatra's
concern for the less fortunate,
on a personal,
even a global basis. I
remember an occasion
(and this goes way
back) when there was
some much publicised
racial unrest in a
Chicago public school.
Sinatra flew to
Chicago, talked to the
youngsters and only
sermonised by singing
his then recenlty
recorded "The House I
Live In." That was all
that was needed to
defuse a highly volatlle
situation.
On another occasion,
some years later,
mv flrend Avanell Harris,
with whom I was
making my home, was
the victim of a burglary.
The thieves took the
record player, among
other loot, all my
Sinatra albums. I was
desolated. There was a
pollce report and a
It has always been
my feeling that anyone
who doesn'1 "dig"
Sinatra hasn't really
listened to him. In Los
Angeles during the late
World War II years, an
accomodatlon was
made to the military by See KEY, Page 1_4
WESTERN BOOKKEEPING & TAX SERVICE
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Ouol,ty Service Since 1963
lnd1v1duol • Portnersh,p
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VEGAS
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EBONY'S GALLERY OF FAME
¥
WAL:~R F!ti{Ncls WH E (b. t anta, Georgia, July 1, 189 ; . arc , .
Execu_t,ve_ Secretary of the NAACP for 24 years , White began his career with the
organ_1zat1on under James Weldon Johnson , was leader In fight for Negro ri ghts and
equality 37 years.
Johnson Pubtl1hlng Co. , Chic.go
14 Las Vegas SENTINEL. Thursday, February 18, 1982
,
BLACK MUSLIM . EMPIRE TRACED
CHICAGO · He
called himself a prophet
and lived like a
king.
Dwelling in a
fortress-like mansion
and surrounded by
bodyguards, he held
the unswerving loyalty
of thousands - some of
whom, it was said,
would kill without
hesitation at his command.
Almost seven years
after his death, Elijah
Muhammad is again a
figure of controversy,
not because of the
Black Muslim sect he
built, but because of a
battle among his
children over the
millions he "massed in
its name.
At the center of the
dispute is the reputation
of Elijah Muhammad
- whether he was a
visionary black leader
or, as some contend, a
man who enriched
himself at the expense
of thousands of
, believers.
The battle has been
fought over the past
five months in a
Chicago courtroom by
lawyers for most of Elijah
Muhammad's 21
legitimate and illegitimate
children.
Their weapons are
records of a sprawling
financial empire valued
at as much as $25
million.
A Circuit Court judge
is expected to rule
Tuesday on the central
lawsuit. Lawyers for
the children who sued
say Herbert Muhammad,
administrator of
his father's estate, excluded
from the estate
property that should
have gone to Elijah
Muhammad's heirs.
Herbert and his
brother Wallace, who
succeeded their father
as leaders of the sect,
argue that Elijah
Muhammad kept his
personal property
separate from that of
the Nation of Islam,
and that the property in
question belongs to the
entire Muslim community,
now known as
the World Community
of Islam in the West.
The suit has revealed
some of the complex
financial dealings of
the secretive sect. But
the dispute is rooted in
the rise of the Black
Muslims, and of Elijah
Muhammad
Born Elijah Poole in
1897, he was the son of
a Georgia sharecropper
and Baptist preacher.
Like millions of blacks,
he migrated north during
the depression. In
Detroit he found odd
jobs • and a man who
said he was God.
The man was
Wallace Fard, and he
anointed Elijah Poole
as his prophet.
AME Churches Celebrate 'Founding
The African
Methodist Episcopal
Church was started in
Philadelphia, Pennsylvania
in 1787. Its
Founder was a twentys
even year old
"African" named
Richard Allen.
During the month of
February, A.M.E. Churches
throughout the fifty
United States of
America, the Dominion
of Canada, South
America, West Africa,
South Africa and the
West Indies will be
celebrating the founding
of the Church.
The First African
Methodist Episcopal
Church held the local
celebration at First
A.M.E. Church, 2450
Revere Street, North
Las Vegas, Nevada on
Sun., Feb. 14.
Highlights of the service
were the "Annual
Address" by Rev.
Marion Bennett, pastor
of Zion United
Methodist Church and
the "Emancipation Proclamation"
by Rev. Clifford
Alexander, pastor
of Cosmopolitan A.M.E.
Church. ABUSES------
(from page 2)
and whites alike. But
the invocation of an
anti-Communist argument
by the South
African government is
both hypocritical and
deceitful. Anticommunism,
(the
legitimate opposition
to the establishment of
Leninist dictatorships
through the world) only
has meaning if it is linked
to a democratic and
racially just worldview.
The reason Western
trade unionists and
human rights advocates
are opposed to
Communism worldwide
is because they are
aware that Communist
regimes deny their
citizens the fundament
a I rights of free
association, free press,
and free speech. The recent
events in Poland
are perhaps the
clearest example of
this.
Democratic anti-
Communists have included
in their ranks
such illustrious figures
as civil rights leaders A.
Philip Randolph and
Roy Wilkins; trade
union leaders George
Meany and Lane
Kirkland; socialists and
social democrats such
as African leader
Leopold Senghor, Norm
an Thomas and
French President Francois
Mitterrand. All of
these public figures
have had a profound
committment to
democracy.
Each of them has
asserted that anti-
Communism has no
moral basis unless it is
linked to a ~trong commitment
to democratic
procedures and human
rights. The South
African government
can make no claims to
such a commitment. Its
history of rule is one of
tyranny against all
blacks and non-whites.
KEY
from page ~3
dienne Alec Lovejoy,
opened an entrepreneurial
venture called
"Alec Lovejoy and
his Big Leg Chicken."
Lovejoy considered
Sinatra over-rated. He
definitely was not a fan.
A "Sinatra Appreciation
Night" was planned
and the proprietor of
Backstage had the juke
box stacked with even
more Sinatra records.
Lovejoy was a willing
guinea pig. In less than
an hour of listening and
really hearing Sinatra,
Lovejoy became a con-
, vert. That "Sinatra Appreciate
Night", incidentally,
became a
weekly feature at the
Backstage.
The man and his
music is a constant
feature in my every day
life, and I am eternally
grateful for the unmitigated
pleasure his
music has afforded me.
And when I see his
name on the marquee
at Caesars I just feel
great that Sinatra is in
town.
*******
Speaking of genuine
artistry, have you made
visiting the Raffles Bar
in the Desert Inn to
hear the Kirk Stuart Trio
a habitual must yet?
Dr. Kirk Stuart would
have delighted the
souls of those three
great artists mentioned
earlier - King Cole,-
Tatum, and Garner, all
of whom, sadly have
gone on to perform in
the celestial arena.
How they would have
appreciated this young
Dr. Stuart who has a little
bit of all of them in
him - and Earl Hines
and,, name them. He is
something, is Kirk
Stuart who, by the way,
will be in Washington,
D.C., this week-end
with jazz singer Joe
Williams who is being
immortalized at the
Smithsonian Institute.
HOUSE FOR SALE
Pool. furniture. Like
new• Must Go. $12,000
takes all. Low assumption.
Call 452-1371.
'79 'S eville loaded. Trip
computer , moon roof.
$12,300. Cordovan
Brown. Call 382-7122.
CLOCK---
C from page 2 .)
national problems requi
re national solutions;
that hunger in
Michigan is the same
as hunger in Mississippi
and that fairness
demands poor people
receive the same
trestmentNherever they
reside.
Making welfare a
state responsibility
means that poor people
will be treated differently
depending on
where they live, the
strength of their state's
finances, and the willingness
of the state
legislatures and local
power blocks to deal
fairly with the poor.
Experience shows
the _states are likely to
deal callously with
their poor. Welfare
benefits are down
sharply everywhere due
to inflation as state
governments refuse to
raise those benefits to
keep pace with lost purchasing
power. There is
a tremendous disparity
among the states on a
range of benefits poor
people are entitled to.
The President has
often said that if people
WE HAVE YOUR DREAM
of a home. All types and
sizes. Assumptions or
new financing. We also
sell government houses.
Call now. Western Skies
Realty, Inc., Realtor.
385-7733 - 24 hours, or
878-0522
don't like the way their
state governments
treat them, they are
free to move elsewhere.
That's an extraordinarily
insensitive way of
looking at things. The
mass black exodus northward
exemplified
people voting with their
feet to escape oppressive
local segregation
and imposed
poverty. But think of
the tremendous cost to
individuals and the nation
of that kind of
human and social
disruption.
The new states'
rights practically invites
states to export
their poverty by making
conditions so tough for
their poor that they'll
want to move
elsewhere. I can't see
our national government
adopting the sort
of caveman ethics that
allows this.
Federal assumption
of full costs of social
welfare programs
coupled with uniform
national entitlement
and benefit standards
would relieve states of
fiscal strains, rationalize
the inefficient
and wasteful
hodgepodge of current
programs, and deal fairly
with poor people.
Information on
ALASKAN and
OVERSEAS Jobs.
$20,000 to $50,000 per
year possible. Cali
602/998-0426
------~--------~--------------------, i DON'T MISS A SINGLE ISSUE!:
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:L ..._M _y_ c_h_e_cl_o._ f_0<_ _S_ _________, s_e_n_c_l_o_se_d_ _ _
REQUEST FOR QUALIFIED
MINORITY SUBCONTRACTORS
AND SUPPLIERS
For constructing a portion of a highway on Interstate
Route 515 in Las Vegas from Maryland
Parkway to Las Vegas Boulevard, County of
Clark, State of Nevada, Contract 1916. Bids to
State of Nevada, February 25, 1982 at 1 :30 p.m.
Please Contact:
S. J. Groves & Sons Company
P.O. 12127
Reno, Nevada 89510
Telephone 702/331-3304
(AEOE)
Las Vegas SENTINEL, Thursday, February 18, 1982 15 -CLASSIFIED ADVERTISING
INVITATION FOR BIDS
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN
THAT THE Board of Commls•
sioners, Clark County,
Nevada wlll receive sealed
bids on the dates and time indicated
for the followlng:
10 a.m. February 23, 1982
Bid. No. CA 702-82,
Clark County Court•
house Addition
3 p.m. February 25, 1982
RFP No. 503-82, Data
Processing Communications
Switching
and Testing Equipment
EARL HAWKES
Director of Purchasing
Publlshed: The Las Vegas
Sentlnal
February 18, 1982
SENIOR BUYER
$19,187 Annually
Any combination of training and experience
equivalent to graduation from a college or
university In business administration or a closely
related fleld, and two years of responsible professional
experience In purchasing and contract
administration, preferably governmental.
FIiing closes February 22, 1982 at 5:00 P.M.
, Apply to:
Department of Personnel &
Employee Relations
City of Las Vegas
400 East Stewart Avenue
Las Vegas, NV 89101
702/386-6315
JNeNIHUIIINI II UU1 .... ue AN EQUAL OPPORTUNITY EMPLOYER M/F/H -===========::;--
··.··l )R. ,·.!It 1.:,t-: H. ~;.i:1:,RE
PALM READER
Are you seeking HELP ~ Come Sf".'P !he woman who can heir; Y'JU
She secs all. tells all You do not have to tell her she'll tell you Q,....e
v1s,1 1~ ail you II nt•f'd She·s. reader of all rt>'aders She hcts !hi"
sr.l~tion to all vour p,otirems Love ,.., 1rna9f' h..tpo111e,.., dnrl t1~•alth
, Read James Chpt 5
Verses 13 16 1 S34 Boulder Hwy.
or rr,1/ fnr 565 0030 rippoi11lmP11I •
Just this s1d•~ of Henderson, Eas1 s•d ~ of H,qhway
Lu'-'.!' ! SSIO ", ER PAUl J. CIIRI STEtlSEN
CO:.',MISSIO~lER AL LEVY
CO~MISSIONER RON LURIE
co:-:MI ',SI ONER ROY WOOFTER
P U B L I C N O T I C E
P U B L I C H E A R I N G
FIRST PUBLIC HEARING ON THE
EIGHTH YEAR COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT
BLOCK GRANT PROGRAM
WI LL TAKE PLACE
WEDNESDAY, ~ARCH 3, 1982
@ 2 :00 P. M.
COMl·'.ISSION CHf-1',BERS
C !TY HALL
400 E. STE',iART AVE!,~E
• LAS VEGAS, N•~i.JA
AT THIS MEETING, APPL 'fAT!Q•,S ,('q
EIGHT~ YEAR co~~ NITY DE 'ELD M~\· BLOCK GRA~· .~.
hlll BE CONSIDER•C. F" Bl!C CO'·""'iTS -~t '
FJR F I<" "R '' F l:.'",.T • T
NOTICE TO CONTRACTORS
BIDS WANTED FOR
HIGHWAY IMPROVEMENT
Sealed proposals wlll be received by the Directors of the Department of
Transportation of the State of Nevada at their District I Headquarters Office
located at 1200 North Main Street, Las Vegas, Nevada, 89104, untli 1:30
p.m., local time, .on March 18, 1982, for Contract No. 1917, Project No.
M-562(1), construction of a portion of the Urban Highway System of Sunset
Road-Henderson, between Gibson Road and the Boulder Highway, Clark
County, a length of 1.006 miles.
SPECIFIC DESCRIPTION OF WORK COVERED BY THIS CONTRACT
CONSISTS OF: WIDENING THE ROADBED, CONSTRUCTING CONCRETE
CURB AND GUTTER, INSTALLING A HIGHWAY LIGHTING SYSTEM, PLACING
AN AGGREGATE BASE COURSE, A PLANTMIX BITUMINOUS SURFACE
COURSE OF RECYCLED ASPHALT CONCRETE AND AN OPENGRADED
PLANTMIX BITUMINOUS WEARING COURSE.
The mlnimim wage to be paid on this contract shall be as determined by·
the Secretary of Labor or the State Labor Commissioner and are set forth In
the contract documents.
Employment lists may be obtained from the local office of the Nevada
Employment Security Department at 119 Water Street, Henderson, Nevada
89105.
Plans and specifications may be examined at the office of the undersigned,
the Department of Transportation District Offices at Sparks, and Las
Vegas, Nevada; the Regional Office of the Federal Highway Administration,
2 Embarcadero Center, Suite 530, San Francisco, Callfornla, 94111; at
the offices of the Associated General Contractors of America, 438 South
Main Street, Salt Lake City, Utah, 84101; and 300 South Wells Avenue,
Reno, Nevada 89502; at the office of F. W. Dodge Company, P.O. Box 14185,
Las Vegas, Nevada 89114, at the office of Daily Pacific Builder, 2450 17th
Street, San Francisco, California, 94110; and at the office of the Construction
Notebook, 3599 Polaris, Las Vegas, Nevada 89103. Plans, form of proposal,
contract and specifications maybe secured by prequallfied bidders
through the office of the undersigned. A fee of Twenty Dollars ($20.00) Is required
for the purchase of each copy of the plans with proposal form
Plans, proposal form and peclficatlons obtained on this basis are nonreturnable
and no refund wlll be made. Bids must be on the proposal form
of the Department of Transportation and must be accompanied by a bid
bond, a certified check, a cashier's check, or cash in the amount of five percent
(5%) of bid.
Right is reserved to reject any or ail bids.
Contractors desiring to bid on this work, If not already quallfled under
the State Law, shall file with the Department of Transportation at Carson
City, Nevada, not later than five (5) days prior to the date for opening of
bids, a complete application for quallflcatlon on form furnished by the
Department. All requests must be made In writing on the standard printed
form provided free of charge for that purpose by the Department of
Transportation.
The attention of bidders is directed to the State Contractor's License
Law requirement (NRS 624.230 as amended to date), that a contractor hold
a valid license of a class corresponding to the work to be done. Requests
for license may be directed to the Secretary of the State Contractor's
Board, 328 South Wells Avenue (P.O. Box 7497), Reno, Nevada.
This Is a Federal-aid project and as such, any contractor otherwise
qualified by the State of Ne'lada to perform such~ Is not required to be
licensed nor to submit application for llcense in advdnce of submitting a
bid or having such bid considered; provided, however, that such exemption
does not constitute a waiver of the State's right under Its license laws to require
a contractor, determined to be a successful bidder, to be licensed to
do business in the State of Nevada In connection with the award of a contract
to him.
The State of Nevada Department of Transportation wlll on Its own in•
itiative, take affirmative action, Including the Imposition of contract sanctions
and the initiation of appropriate legal proceedings under any applicable
State or Federal law to achieve equal employment opportunity on
Federal-aid Highway Projects and wlll actively cooperate with the Federal
Highway Administration in all investigations and enforcement actions
undertaken by the Federal Highway Administration.In conjunction with the
above statement, th Department of Transportation wlll no I u plan to
an irresponsible bidder. Sub ectlon (B) of th ection 112 of Title 23 Unit d
States Code has been am nded by addl g at th end thereof, t e following:
"Contract for th con truct on of ea project hall be aw rded only on
the ba I of the lowe t re pon Ive b d ubmltt d by b1dd r m t ng
es abllshed crlte a of respon lb i y
of Tr p rtatlon
9 72
ROOM ADDfflONt; , ,
Fl ANCING AVAILAeLE
.-.AL>,,.
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22 — Las Vegas Review-Journal —Tuesday, October 1,1974
DEDICATION —Honoree Mrs. Mabel Hoggard, husband David, and Principal
Bob Gaston pose proudly with a portrait presented to the school in formal dedication
ceremonies recently of Mabel Hoggard Elementary. The school,
formerly Bonanza Elementary, is now named for the first black educator hired
by the Clark County School District.
D. D. Murphy, President, Elkader
Geo. T. Baker, Davenport
Chas. R. Brenton, Dallas Center
P. K. Holbrook, Onawa
Edw. P. Schoentgen, Council Bluffs
H. M. Eicher, Washington
Frank F. Jones, Yillisca
Paul E. Stillman, Jefferson
W. C. Stuckslager, Lisbon
Sofom is>tate poarb of Cbucatton
JOHN E. FOSTER
INSPECTOR OF SECONDARY SCHOOLS
DES MOINES
STATE UNIVERSITY Iowa City
STATE COLLEGE OF AGRICULTURE
AND MECHANIC ARTS
STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE
Cedar Falls
COLLEGE FOR THE BLIND.Vinton
SCHOOL FOR THE DEAF
Council Bluffs
CERTIFICATE OF HIGH SCHOOL CREDITS
(This certificate should be sent to the Registrar of the institution which the applicant desires to enter.)
This certifies that who attended the
..Gp.lL.ax. Gchool , £ Colfax I. ov; a
(Name of School) (City) (State) '
years, and was graduated on the day of , 191 , is a person of
good moral character, has satisfactorily completed preparatory studies as hereinafter indicated, and is recommended
as able to carry forward college work.
Date of- this certificate..u.?Xkj....i. , 193X 1 To r
Principal or Supefmtendent."
Home address of applicant..., ,
; (Street Number) (City) '
Age of applicant at graduation..... years. Passing grade ; A. per cent.
College course applicant desires to pursue
Length of Recitation periods....'1Q minutes. Length of Laboratory periods.....??..
Regular total number of class periods per week for each pupil 20
(State)
.minutes.
SUBJECTS
(For regulations concerning each group,
see reverse side of this blank and Bulletin
No. 1 of the Board on Secondary
School Relations.)
E n g l i s h :
Composition and Rhetoric ....
History of American Lit
History of English Lit
Classics - -
Grammar
Latin:
Beginning Latin
Caesar *books
Cicero *orations
Vergil *books
Prose Composition ...,*pages..
• French:
German: .:
History:
Ancient
Mediaeval and Modern
English -
United States
General
Civics
Student's
Year in
Course
1st, 2d, 3d
or 4 th
dumber
i Weeks
Pursued
Economics
Mathematics:
Algebra—first year
Algebra—third semester
Plane Geometry
Solid Geometry
A
A
t Number
Periods
Per Week
..18...
Average
Standing
SUBJECTS
(For regulations concerning each group
see reverse side of this blank and Bulletin
No. 1 of the Board on Secondary
School Relations.)
Student's
Year in
Course
1st, 2d, 3d
or 4 th
92
89
Natural Science:
Agriculture
Biology
Botany
Chemistry
General Science
Physics
Physiography ....
Physiology
Zoology
Commercial, Industrial
and Miscellaneous:
Bookkeeping
Commercial Geography
tDrawing
Home Economics—Cooking
Home Economics—Sewing
fManual Training
Pedagogy
Psychology
Stenography and Typewriting.
Arithmetic (after Algebra)
Number
Weeks
Pursued
•Be sure to indicate the number of bool orations, pages,
flndicate the nature of the work in thisibject.
*Tn laboratory subjects indicate the totalumber of single periods per week
- '—>ir is furnished free to all gh schools in Iowa by the Iowa
' — institutions olearning.
J Number
Periods
Per Week
Average
Standing
56
..3.6.....
18 "5"
89
,93
"9T
State Board of Education. It may be presented at
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C•n
3
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Definition of Unit.—A unit is defined as the equivalent of one high school study satisfactorily , ,
year, at least thirty-six weeks in length, on the basis of five recitations a week ^ Pursued during one school
registered requiring no more than four studies or twenty recitation periods! week Thflength o/ the" libn ^ St.U26nt ls
he at least forty minutes, and the laboratory period shall be twice this length. A unit is equivflent to two semester credits.11
REGULATIONS REGARDING. THE GROUPS OF SUBJECTS WITH REFERENCE It) COLLEGE ENTRANCE CREDIT
• *i?°r unconditional admission to college the applicant must present at least fifteen unite eleven cf wu-iov
m three or more of the following groups as specified in the regulations below- EnS^ Conaist of credlt
and Natural Science. Entrance requirements prescribe three units in English and threeunifs /n fne i Mathematics,
Foreign Language, History, Mathematics, and Natural Science. g three units in one of the following groups:
English Three units required; not more than four units accented Public snpakituHa net t a
required units, nor when the total amount of credit presented in this group exceed^foip units aCC6pted as a ®art of «"> three
English grammar is not accepted unless taken in the latter half of the high school corse.
Foreign Language—Recent action on the part of the Faculties of the State Tnstltntlna fey ui„i
foreign language requirement for admission to these Institutions. The regulationsgoveMsrthe ellminates the
as heretofore. Credit in for ign language is allowed for college admissiononly^ when a^fnimum^ ?f° t£?B sabjeot remaIn
language is presented. One-half unit or more in any foreign language will be accepted inthe caooq nf some one
because of the effect of the war upon their high school course of study, Le unable to ¥nt two ilits in on^foreStngu^e
half!f ^he^hfgh school IZlT' ^ m°r6 ^ f°Ur UnitS aCOepted" U' S- History islt accepted unless taken in theTattTr
m « Liberal Arts
Home Economics in theHtate (i'flegf orArRultTre andPMLhIniTArts.reaUlred f°r adlrSsion to the Hivisiomfof Agriculture and
, ,lPnP,.a!ld °he-half units of algebra, one unit of plane geometry and one-half unit < s JSMSS rarsss zxtsrsa"11,1""
Arithmetic accepted only when taken after three semesters of algebra or in the latteLalf of the high school course.
Natural Science Not more than four and one-half unite accepted.
rtoSZZrTS™™"1 ^ ^ tsce^aneous Hot more than four units accepted un)r the new plan of college admission
F or details see Bulletin No. 1 of the Board on Secondary School Relations.
EDITION QIC 19X9.
Sa0n1rtdMfTet,ry/e<luired for admission and Mechanic Arts, and to the College
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SUBJECTS
(for regulations concerning each
group, see reverse side of this
blank and-Bulletin of the Board
3n Secondary School Relations.)
J Student's
| Year in
I Course
list, 2nd, 3d
or 4th
Number
Weeks
Pursued
JNumber
Periods
Per Week
Average
Standing Number
Weeks
Pursued
tNumber
Periods
Per Week
D. D. Murphy, President, Elkader
Geo. T. Baker, Davenport.
Chas. R. Brenton, Dallas Center
P. K. Holbrook, Onawa
Edw. P. Schoentgen, Council Bluffs
E. Ketcham, Farmington
Frank F. Jones, Villisca
Paul E. Stillman, Jefferson
W. C. Stuckslager, Lisbon
Board on Secondary
Relations
Herman Knapp, Registrar,
Iowa State College, Ames
H. C. Dorcas, Registrar, State
University of Iowa, Iowa City
S- Cory, Registrar,1 Iowa State
Teachers College, Cedar Falls
J. E. Foster, Secretary, Des
(This certificate should be sent to the Registrar of the institution which the applicant desires to enter"
Jnrna #tate ®oari> nf fciwratinit
CERTIFICATE OF HIGH SCHOOL CREDITS
This certifies that..
-4-
(Name of School)
(City)
who attended the
(State)
~4r^uir..„years, and was graduated on the day of ,ni
, , , , , . . . " > l s a p e r s o n o f
good moral character, has satisfactorily completed preparatory studies as hereinnft^r * A A • ed as able to carry forward college work. " ' ereinafter indicated, and is rtecommend-
Date of this certificate J; /. .... 192 (.
Home address of applicant
* (Street Number)
Age of applicant at graduation ve.irs. Passing grade
College course applicant desires to pursue
Length of recitation periods minutes. Length of Laboratory Periods
Regular total number of class periods p(er week for each pupil
Principal or Superintendent
(City) ' (State)
-per c(ent.
-minutes
SUBJECTS
(For regulations concerning each
group, see reverse side of this
blank and B-ulletin of the Board
on Secondary School Relations.)
English:
Composition and Rhetoric-
History of American Lit-
History of English Lit
Classics
Grammar
Student's
Year in
Course
1st, 2nd, 3d
or 4th
Latin:
Beginning Latin
Caesar *books
Cicero *orations._
Virgil *books
Prose Composition..*pages
French
German:
History, Civics,
Economics
Ancient
Medieval and Modern
English
United States-
General
Civics
Economics
Sociology
Natural Science:
Mathematics:
Algebra—first year
Algebra—third semester-
Plane Geometry
Solid Geometry
Agriculture
Biology
Botany
Chemistry
General Science-
Physics...'
Physiology
Physiography
Zoology
Average
Standing
Commercial, Industrial
and Miscellaneous:
Bookkeeping
Commercial Geography.
tDrawing
Home Economics—C'king
Home Economics—Sewing
tManual Training
Pedagogy
Psychology ..:j
Stenog'phy and Typew'ng..
Arithmetic (after Algebra)
*Be sure to indicate the number of books, orations, pages
Tlndicate the nature of the work in this subject
tin laboratory subjects indicate the total number of single periods per week.
This blank is furnished free to alt high schools in Iowa hv JA
state colleges or other institutions of learning.
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NEW REGULATIONS ^ ^^g^U^^SX^Og^OWA, THE IOWA STATE
upo(thg^ntadoTyoff:riey"tr fif£ S'ofcredit ^teO above,
or the Principal. A graduate of any private four-year hifh school Ippr^efby the Boardon sSaSrv
State Board"of Education, December"2,|lm arrangement ls in accordance with the following regulations adopted by theVowa
prepaFed^h^pm-sue ^nyth£sHte°^2^rsit^£SCIowa,Fhe 'pjwa'^tate CoHege^ arkfThe^otya ^Stat^Teach'e^^ColF01^ *' * *
w^/ghfs Ch^frcheooTgcoudrseby jftfeSS? £&£ E^£glSBlJ~ ^
^.ondary School Relations will |e admitted7 o?n the sam7baSis 'g °°V^ ° r aCademy approved the B°^d
ficieircy"~!Ms?bbeCbem0veddatt\he0 msUtutiorf'entered^^Credh^^med11 in^removdn*3 t°ht'* ACourse h<= icsires to pursue the decollege
graduation in the specific course chosen" removing such deficiencies will not be applied toward
The foregoing regulations are retroactive without limit.
istered requiring no more than four studies or twenty recitatioan spersiodts. " a week TtVPl!,,ZL t o • • rthe? strV«den t I>S *re"S*"
»<°"y "d «* p«w .hai, s"?s .ph™iS^h A»»SU ^zr^zr^t"b-
REGULATIONS REGARDING THE GROUPS OF SUBJECTS.WITH. REFERENCE TO ADMISSION TO SPECIFIC
English grammar is not accepted unless taken in the latter half of the high school course.
pWresenteidi i5n oSne ?la£ngu!agte.o Otnre .o&r mo&re urnists wii^ll ibei SaccSept,ed,.0 ' ' &langu2ag£e ris Xtak„enH ftwhoe r oEr <m,roar,ei ounn •itsf mshoru,lsd
' t0hye n0t m°re than fOUr UnitS accepted- U- S- History ««*pted unless
^^s^irrjsrtw 8-«s«Afa
°Lal5ebra ?pnd °ne- ""i1 °f pIane geometry required for complete admission to specific courses in
nd Home Economics in the State College of Agriculture and Mechanic Arts
""brai °nn; "n-U 0f p£ne. geometry, and one-half unit of solid geometry required for comn
»iSd~c£^n£nSrSdSS ™"»st»K <>«&
one-half units accepted.
vi A
more than four units accepted. Arithmetic accepted only when taken after
h school course.
Name
SEVENTH GRADE GEOGRAPHY
_Age S ch o o 1
I. Hndb^hl-irie "the correct word.
• 1. Harbors are frozen in winter in (Poland, France, Italy).
2. The Alps Mountains belong to (Northeast Highland, Central
Highland, Southern Highland).
3. Mt. Everest is in (Asia, South America, North America).. -
4. Spain and Portugal comprise th©- (Ibw-iaB, .BQlkan,
Sjcand-ijAavhoav- Poi.i nsula) .
5. The Elbe is most important river in (Germany, Belgium,
Holland)«
6. Odessa, the greatest wheat port in the World, is on the
( B l a c k , C a s p i a n , A g g e a n S e a ) .
7. The Platu.au of Tibet is in (Asia, Africa, Europe),.
8. The northern part of Siberian Plains are a (tundra,
c o a s t a l p l a i n , o a s i s ) .
II. Mark the statements which correspond.
Natural regions of South
America are
2. Nearly every country of
Europe is r epreseri-ted
3. Brazil Is lgjrgest---
4. Buenos Aires is —-
5. South America has a great
variety of climate
6. South America needs more
7. Europe has many good harbors
1. due to distance from equator,
elevation and location of
mountains»
2 , railroads and white people for
development.
3, due to irregular coast line.
4. in population of South
American countries.
5, Country in South America
6. largest city in South America
7. Andes Mountains, Guiana
Highlands, lowlands, The
Orinoca Lowlands, The Amazon
Lowlands and Parana Lowlands,
2. State five things a community does for its citizens.
1 2 3
4 ----- 5
3. Name three classes of people who contribute little or nothing to the community.
1. 2 - 3
4. Three great social institutions of the community which contribute most toward training for citizenship are:
1 2 3 -
5. A good citizen is concerned in doing many things for the welfare of his community. On the spaces below write five
things that you can do. 1 2. . 3 ............
4 5
Part II. In a sentence define or state an important fact about each of the following terms: (Value, 30)
1. Illiteracy
2. Immigrant - - -
3. Naturalization - -
4. Constitution.. - : -
5. N. R. A -
6. Recreation
7. Corporation
8. Social Service -
9. Protective Tariff
10. Municipal Government -.-
11. Political Party -
12. Communism —-
13. Civil Service -
14. School Citizenship
15. Labor Union.
Part III.
A. (Value 8) Each question below has three answers. Select the best one and place its number in the parentheses at the right.
1. West Virginia became a state in' (1) 1863, (2) 1776, (3) 1848 ( )
2. Our state motto is (1) E Pluribus Unum, (2) Sic Jurat Transcendere Montes, (3) Montani Semper Liberi ( )
3. Laws for the state are made by (1) Congress, (2) The Legislature, (3) The State Supreme Court ( )
4. The Governor is elected for a term of (1) four years, (2) six years, (3) two years ( )
5. Conservation of the state's natural resources is directed mainly by (1) Individual citizens, (2) the state government,
(3) local government - ( )
6. The cost of public education should be paid by (1) the general public, (2) those only who have children in school,
(3) the very wealthy - ( )
7. The cost of state government is met by (1) tariff, (2) public taxation, (3) special endowment ( )
8. Men are placed in prison (1) to protect them, (2) to punish them, (.3) to reform them ( )
B. (Value, 7)
1. Voters in West Virginia must be not less than (1) 16 years old, (2) 25 years old, (3) 21 years old ( )
2. A petit jury is composed of (1) twelve men, (2) sixteen men, (3) twenty men ( )
3. Members of the County Court receive office by (1) election, (2) appointment by the Governor, (3) appointment by
the Circuit Court - - - ( )
4. The term citizen means (1) any taxpayer, (2) any person of voting age, (3) any person born in the United States
or Naturalized here - - - ( )
(See other side)
5. County taxes ere collected by the (1) County Court, (2) Assessor, (3) Sheriff (
6. False testimony on the witness stand is called (1) libel, (2) perjury, (3) contempt of court (
7. The cost of operating county buses for transporting school children is paid mainly by (1) county levy, (2)
private donations, (3) state aid ( )
Part IV. (Value, 6)
A. What do you consider to be three very important questions before our country today?
1
2
3
B. State three important duties expected of every citizen.
1
2 - :
3
Part V. Study carefully. If the statement is true, write T in the parentheses at the right. If not true, write O in the
parentheses. (Value, 20)
1. The chief purpose of the public school is to train boys and girls for citizenship ; ( )
2. Beauty within our homes is usually beyond our control ( )
3. Any state may declare an Act of Congress null and void ( )
4. We pay taxes in order to have public benefits — ( )
5. Members of the President's Cabinet are responsible to him ( )
6. The number of United States Senators from any state depends on the state's population ( )
7. The power to coin money is vested in the President ( )
8. The first community we know is the home ( )
9. The form of government most interested in education is a Monarchy ( )
10. Indictments are found by a petit jury - ( )
11. Nations reach agreements by means of war only ( )
12. The people are usually at fault for poor government ( )
13. A tax-dodger is not loyal to his government ,( )
14. A good citizen is one who votes as his neighbor advises ( )
15. The right to vote in West Virginia is restricted to property holders ( )
16. Voting is not necessarily a public duty ( )
17. The Legislature has no power to change the state constitution ( )
18. School consolidation is closely related to road improvement ( )
19. School levies are laid on all classes of property alike ( )
20. The natural beauty of our state adds to the wealth of its citizens ( )
Part VI. The Flag. (Value, 9)
1. On the spaces below write the words you repeat when you salute the flag:
2. What do you think is meant by each of the following terms?
1. allegiance
2. indivisible
3. liberty.... , - - —- -
4. justice
3. State two reasons why you owe allegiance to our flag and Republic:
1
2,
STATE OF WEST VIRGINIA
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
Charleston, April 4th, 1932.
/ Dear Boys and Girls:
fou should be very happy this morning in the thought that you
; about to complete the course of study prescribed for the elemefi-
:y schools of our state to enable you to become a leader in your
mmunity, an honor to your state and nation, and always a source
joy and pride to your parents.
You should not feel, however, that there is nothing left for you
learn—in fact, you have really just started. If possible, you should
ntinue through high school and college.
Upon whatever field of endeavor you may enter, I would have you
:ep in mind that, as State Superintendent of Free Schools of our
•eat State of West Virginia, I shall always have a kindly interest
. your success and welfare.
Looking to you to maintain high ideals of citizenship in our comonwealth,
I am, and shall remain
Sincerely yours,
LO.
State Superintendent of Free Schools.
INSTRUCTIONS TO PUPILS
Write your name and address at the top of each sheet of paper
in left corner.
Name of subject in the center of the paper at top.
Date, and name of school attended, in upper right corner.
Number your answers to correspond with the questions given.
Use pen and ink, and write on one side of paper only.
Each pupil should sit alone and far enough removed from other
pupils so as to do his work independently.
The examiner should be careful not to give information which will
in any way suggest the answer.
If a pupil wishes to leave the room before the examination on a
subject is completed, he must give his questions and manuscript
to the examiner before leaving.
Pupils must not ask the examiner to explain questions. Any
reasonable interpretation will be accepted.
To earn a diploma, the applicant must make an average of 75%
with no subject below 60%.
STATE OF WEST VIRGINIA
DEPARTMENT OF FREE SCHOOLS
ELEMENTARY DIPLOMA TEST
GEOGRAPHY
April 14-15, 1932
Thursday, 9:15 to 10:45 A. M.
I
What has geography taught you about your country?
II
Name and locate In order of size five ot the largest
cities in the United States.
III
Name three factors necessary in the growth of a city.
IV
Draw an outline map of our state. Docate on your map
five of our principal rivers; five of our largest cities.
Name and indicate on your map five of our chief industrial
centers.
V-VI
Below you will find a number of statements. Some of
these statements are true, and some are false. If you
think the statement is true, write true in front of it in
the spaoe indicated; if you think the statement is false,
write false:
1. The United States is the wealthiest
country of the world.
2. West Virginia has very little coal,
oil and gas.
3. West Virginia has the most irregular
boundary line of any state.
4. The first settlements made in the
United States were along the rivers
of the Pacific Coast.
5. The swift-flowing streams of the south
enabled the southern people at an
early date to take an active interest
in manufacturing.
6. New York City is the largest shipping
point in the world,
7. Trade with a foreign country is called
domestic commerce.
8. The Panama Canal is a water route
from the Atlantic to the Pacific
Ocean.
9. The people of China and Japan belong
to the Mongolian race.
10. South America has a greater population
than North America.
VH
Explain why Europe has more separate nations
than any of the other continents.
VIII
Name four island possessions of the United States
and tell something of the people on each.
IX
Complete this statement: The greatest natural
resources of the United States are (a) ,
(b) (c) , (d) ,
(e)
X
Copy and underline the right word to complete each of
the following sentences:
1. The largest axe factory in the world is found in
(Pittsburgh, Chicago, Charleston, West Virginia).
2. The largest apple orchards in the world are located i:
(Pennsylvania, West Virginia, New York, Oregon',
3. The total population of West Virginia is about tb
same as (New York City, Detroit, Philadelphia
Chicago).
4. The chief food crops of the United States are (cor
wheat, rice, sugar, coffee).
STATE OF WEST VIRGINIA
DEPARTMENT OF FREE SCHOOLS
ELEMENTARY DIPLOMA TEST
READING
April 14-15, 1932
Thursday, 1:00 to 2:00 P. M.
I
What joy do you get out of Reading?
II
Give the author of each of the following poems:
1. To a Waterfowl.
2. Old Ironsides.
3. A Man's a Man for a' That.
4. Snow Bound.
5. Columbus.
III
Give a quotation from one of the poems listed
above and explain what it means.
IV
Name one well known Scotch, one English, and
three American prose writers, and give the name of
a book or a story written by each.
V
(a) List the books which you have read this year.
(b) Give the name of the book which interested
you most and tell why.
VI
Describe the winter scene around the Whittier
homestead the morning after the storm broke.
VII
Compare the life of Whittier with the life of
Henry W. Longfellow using the following outline:
home environment, opportunities of the two boys,
their education, positions filled, and achievements
in life.
VIII
Give the name of a story or a poem in which we
find the theme is one of the following: flowers,
birds, animals, legend, love.
IX
Write a sentence about each of the following:
Satan, the War Dog, Rip Van Winkle, Scrooge,
Ichabod Crane, The Gray Champion.
X
On page 304 in your reader, Theodore Roosevelt
says of George Washington that "he was the greatest
of good men and the best of great men." Tell
us briefly what made Washington great and good.
STATE OF WEST VIRGINIA
DEPARTMENT OF FREE SCHOOLS
ELEMENTARY DIPLOMA TEST
PENMANSHIP
April 14-15, 1932
Friday, 1:00 to 1:15 P. M.
I-IX (90% on Ayres Scale)
Copy the following as an illustration of your best
writing ability:
"Promote then, as an object of primary importance,
institutions for the general diffusion of knowledge.
In proportion as the structure of a government
gives force to public opinion, it is essential
that public opinion should be enlightened."—George
Washington.
X
Why should we try to write well ?
STATE OF WEST VIRGINIA
DEPARTMENT OF FREE SCHOOLS
ELEMENTARY DIPLOMA TEST
PHYSIOLOGY AND HYGIENE
April 14-15, 1932
Thursday, 10:45 A. M. to 12:00 M
I
Teeth!"6 3 Sh°rt paragraph on "The Care of the
II-III
„-ia^ What active agent is found in whiskey, beer
wine and simlar drinks that makes them harmful9 '
does whiskey, or any drink containing
lowed?' aUd Stmg the throat when S
S°Ch d™to «
(d) The New York State Department of Health
has on one of its charts this sentence: "Alcohol
thB m""
(e) Why did the United States and other coundo
away Wlth alcohol during the World War?
IV
• (,a). TeP som,e the things cur State government
thim'te he*"hy and h"'
ari^o™ ta*llh °fflc" ™d
V '
Why is the open outside toilet at ho™'
school a menace to the community ?
(b) How should a sanitary outside toilet be
VI
dir eenn ^oouutf 0 nof? school than "acnoyl dso"t hkeere p omneo r..
>ai) What can be done to prevent "cd
(b) How should one treat a "cold?"
VII
-rules you must observe in o
Boy or G?rh °r & Standard West Virg
VIII
• Ina sentence or two tell what each of the folio
LIjOTUuisif PPa^stteemur8, 1 EFdd6w Ca°rdn, diJtrei0nnn °efr ta,J SlF lorence Nie-hti
gale, William Harvey, Walter Reed. S
IX
one^kSthyf °f & ^ SUrfaCed r0ad shouk
inibitYheanoTe?ld y°U d° f°r a bad CUt and bleed"
X
minZcroeoa sm-wgb y oyro idi etchrienaks i_ nsgic. kness and disease are iu-
STATE OF WEST VIRGINIA
DEPARTMENT OF FREE SCHOOLS
ELEMENTARY DIPLOMA TEST
CIVIL GOVERNMENT
April 14-15, 1932
Thursday, 3:00 to 4:00 P. M.
I
Why is it necessary to have government?
(b) Name at least two different forms of government
and tell us the one you prefer
II
(a) List five expenses connected with our state
government. 1
(b) Tell how West Virginia secures money to
meet the expenses listed.
III
Give the district, county, state and national tax
levying bodies.
IV
(a) Who are your Delegates and Senator in the
State Legislature?
(b) How often and where does our Legislature
meet to make laws ?
V-VI (20%)
Of the following statements, some are true and
some false. If you think the statements false, write
false m the blank space at the left; if true, write
true:
1- Good citizenship requires everyone to
take an active interest in community
affairs.
All communities have a common interest
in good roads, telephone
lines, and sanitation.
— 3- A man who obeys the laws is a good
citizen.
4- One's desires have little influence on
his daily life.
5- The chief aim of our public schools is
to teach children how to make
money.
6- A child receives his first schooling in
the home.
— 7. The man who rents a farm takes as
much interest in the community as
the farm owner.
8- Sickness is often due to the insanitary
conditions found in and around
homes and the schoolhouse.
9. Most criminals are educated people.
10- We find better sanitary conditions in
the city than in the country.
VII-VIII (20%)
Tr a) ,%w many times has the constitution of the
{ United States been amended ?
(b) To what do the last two amendments relate?
, (c) Which one of these amendments is the more
abused and debated today?
(a) What should be the attitude of our citizens
towards this amendment ?
IX
(a) Give the qualifications for the President of
the United States.
TT Q) maay senators does each state send to
United States Congress ? How many congressional
districts has West Virginia?
X
Name the seven state offices that must be filled
by election this yeai.
STATE OF WEST VIRGINIA
DEPARTMENT OF FREE SCHOOLS
ELEMENTARY DIPLOMA TEST
AGRICULTURE
April 14-15, 1932
Friday, 10:45 to 12:00 M.
How does agriculture in West Virginia compare
with other industries in the State?
II
What section of our state is best suited for developing
each of the following: corn, gardening,
apples and peaches, potatoes, buckwheat?
III-1V (20%)
(a) What do you understand by soil?
(b) What is wrong with a soil that is said to
"worn out" or "run down?"
(c) What three plant foods do most of West
ginia soils need?
(d) Give two ways by which these needed
foods can be supplied to the soil.
<e) Which way is the better and cheaper?
Give a good three-year crop rotation and
why it is good.
VI
In what sections of our state do we find
the following in greatest number: beef cattle,
cows, hogs, sheep, poultry?
VII
(a) Give three good reasons why it is
to prepare a good seed bed and cultivate corn.
(b) At what time in the growth of corn, or potatoes,
should a farmer discontinue cultivation, and
why?
VIII
(a) Name five insect pests that attack and destroy
field and garden crops.
(b) What can the farmer do to protect his crops
against such pests?
IX
List five farmer friends living in field and forest
that help him in his fight against the insects.
X
Many of our good people still cling to the
notion that any one can be a "farmer." What
qualifications and preparation do you think one
should have in order to be a successful farmer?
STATE OF WEST VIRGINIA
DEPARTMENT OF FREE SCHOOLS
ELEMENTARY DIPLOMA TEST
HISTORY
April 14-15, 1932
Friday, 1:45 to 3:15 P. M.
I
(a) What were three causes which inspired
European nations to desire to explore and colonize
the new world?
(b) What was found in the new world?
II
Name two explorers sent out by England, two by
France and two by Spain and tell what part of our
country each explored and the result of such exploration
on the later history of our country.
III
Name five of the thirteen original colonies and
tell where and by what people each was settled.
IV
From the following list of dates select five which
you consider of most importance in our nation's history
and tell why you think so:
1492 1619 1776 1803 1898
1607 1732 1789 1861 1918
V
Connect each item in column A with the corresponding
item in column B so as to make a statementof
fact:
A B
1. Taxation without repre- 1. Panama Canal
sentation caused
2. Cornstalk commanded In- 2. Robert Fulton,
dians in
3. Civil Service abolished the 3. Spoils System
4. General Goethals built the 4. The Revolution-
- „ . ary War
5. Steamboats were made prac- 5. Battle of Point
tical by Pleasant
VI
Complete the following sentences :
1. The armistice was signed on
(YEAR)
2
(.MONTH) (DAY OF KG
invented the
thus prolonginj
)n who did mi
Independence were
: - prolonging slavery.
2. The three men most to win the war
- , and
4 invented the telep)
5. A West Virginian by the name of
carried the message to Garcia o
island of
vii
Make a brief statement of historical interest abou
of the following: Morgan Morgan, Governor Spot
Francis H. Pierpont, Waitman Barbe, James E
Luther Burbank, Charles Goodyear, Benjamin N C
Dwight W. Morrow, Horace Mann.
VIII
In what way have the following places and exp
attracted attention in the early history and deve
ot West Virginia? Fort Henry? Moundsville?
Land Grant? Knights of the Golden Horseshoe?
hassett Island?
IX
(a) What do you understand by the "open
China, and tell what part, if any, the United S
taken in this policy.
(b) What is the cause of the present conflic J
China and Japan?
X
Write a short sketch of the life of the great
whom our nation is especially honoring this ye;
STATE OF WEST VIRGINIA
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
CHARLESTON
This envelope contains copies of the Questions
on the Subjects of
ARITHMETIC, AGRICULTURE,
PENMANSHIP, SPELLING
AND HISTORY AND
CURRENT EVENTS
I for the
II
ELEMENTARY DIPLOMA TEST ')
to be held
FRIDAY
This examination will be held under the supervision of
M..
At..
All pupils must be ready for the subjects named above
before this envelope is opened.
SUGGESTED SCHEDULE
THURSDAY
9:00- 9:15 Enrollment y. u,,
9:15-10:45 Geography
10:45-12:00 Physiology and Hygiene 114
1:00- 3:00 Reading and English 2
3:00- 4:00 Civil Government " 1
FRIDAY
9:00-10:45 Arithmetic 13/ u-
10:45-12:00 Agriculture
1:00- 1:15 Penmanship ' 1/
1:15- 1:45 Spelling y2
1:45- 3:15 History and Current Events - iy2
L
STATE OF WEST VIRGINIA
DEPARTMENT OF EDUCATION
..West Virginia.
..1932.
NAME..
Post Office R. F. D..
Dear Pupil: In the Elementary Diploma Test you received grades
on the various subjects as follows:
^ O r t h o g r a p h y . . . .
Reading
P e n m a n s h i p . . . .
Arithmetic
English Grammar . .
Physiology and Hygiene
Civil Government . . .
U. S. and W. Va. History
Geography
Agriculture
Average
These grades do (or do not) entitle you to an Elementary School
Diploma which admits you to any High School in West Virginia.
STATE OF WEST VIRGINIA
DEPARTMENT OF FREE SCHOOLS
ELEMENTARY DIPLOMA TEST
M.
ARITHMETIC
April 14-15, 1932
Friday, 9:00 to 10:45 A.
I
Find the sum of each of the following:
(a) . (b)
456,732 596,345
584,856 486,795
296,489 779,658
375,697 368,536
549,268 . 874,529
867,849. 654,980
II
What do you understand by the following terms:
interger; fraction; unit; denominator; numerator.
III
How would you find: The area of a circle?
The convex surface of a
cone?
The area of a triangle?
The volume of a cylinder ?
IV
Find the cost of 50 joists ten inches wide, two
inches thick, and eighteen feet long at $40.00 a thousand
feet.
V
A farmer contracted for $100 worth of fencing
wire. The merchant explained that he was selling
the wire at a discount of 20% from the list price,
and if the farmer would pay cash he would be allowed
an additional discount of 10%. The farmer
paid cash. What did the wire cost him ?
VI
A merchant sold a pair of shoes for $6.00 and
stated that he sold them at a loss of 20% of the
cost. What was the cost?
VII
(a) Write in words: .0485; 4.000075.
(b) Add the numbers in (a).
(c) Write in figures one million and one millionth.
(d) Divide 100.5 by 1.005.
VIII
If one cubic foot of a silage weighs 40 pounds,
how many tons of silage can be placed in a silo that
is 12 feet in diameter and 24 feet high?
IX
A merchant borrowed $1000.00 from a bank at
6% interest, and gave his note. At the expiration of
one year, eight months, and eighteen days, he paid
the note in full. What was the amount of the note?
X
(a) A man's farm, including personal property
and household goods is valued at $4800. The total tax
levies for his district amount to $1.70 on each $100
assessed valuation. If he is assessed at two-thirds
of the valuation given what is the amount of his,
taxes, including a capitation tax of two dollars ?
(b) If taxes are paid before December first, a dis
count of 2% is allowed. This man pays before De
cember first. How much taxes does he pay?
Bluefield State Teachers College
5th
Graduating Exercises
Summer Session
1940
ARTER HALL
THURSDAY, AUGUST 8,1940
6:00 P. M.
BLUEFIELD STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE
Bluefield, West Virginia
Bachelor of Science in
Emma J. Allen
Mabel P. Beverly
Cora L. Scott
Anthony William Calloway
Gertrude Carter Chapman
Virginia Brown-Douthit
India Thomas Gilbert
Louise Lovette Hambrick
(Cum Laude)
Virginia B. James
Esther Smith Johnson
Elizabeth Lord
Sallie Mae McClendon
Nannie L.
Bachelor of Science in
Robert Philip Edmondson
Herbert Marvin Ferguson
Elementary Education
Fannie Webb Redd
Almeta Elizabeth Ridley
Suzanne McClain Slaughter
(Cum Laude)
Eleanor Blanchette Sutton
Maudella White Taylor
Theresa Angela Thornton
(Cum Laude)
Regelia Carter Warren
(Cum Laude)
Mabel Welch Wims*
Elizabeth Ann. Witten
Xenia Lucille Wiseman
Whittico*
Secondary Education
Hiawatha Nakomis Harding
Carolyn Lee McNorton
'•'Denotes students with honors unable to meet resident requirements.
P R O G R A M
Academic Procession—
Invocation Rev. Hubert C. Jones
Pastor John Stewart M. E. Church
Bluefield, W. Va.
"I Have a Rendezvous with Life" O'Hara
Summer Chorus
"This World of Realism" Mr. Earle C. Smith
Assistant Superintendent of Fayette County Schools
Fayetteville, W. Va.
Presentation of Candidates for Degrees Dean G. W. Whiting
Conferring of Degrees Dr. D. T. Murray
Member Negro State Board of Education
Keystone, W. Va.
A Presentation to the College by Summer Class of '38
Mr. William Law
"Somebody's Knocking at Your Door" Dett
Summer Chorus
Remarks and Greetings Hon. I. J. K. Wells
Secretary of Negro State Board of Education
and Supervisor of Negro Schools
Charge to Graduates President IJ. L. Dickason
Benediction Rev. J. R. Washington
Pastor Community Methodist Church
Pocahontas, Va.
Bluefield State Hymn—
(Audience is invited to sing. Words on back of program)
BLUEFIELD STATE HYMN
Once again thy name we raise
In accents loud and clear,
Sing we ever more thy praise
Bluefield, our school so dear,
High upon thy terraced hill
We see thee strong and true
And our hearts with courage fill
Our School, Old Gold and Blue.
Upward through the years we'll climb
While ever lifting thee
Thy precepts always in mind
Honor and Loyalty.—
Men may come and men may go
And, passing through thy gate
Feel within their hearts a glow
For thee—Dear Bluefield State.
Words and Music by Eugene Jones, '38.
SUMMER SESSION
( f 0 I I I
ARTER HALL
THURSDAY, AUGUST 3, 1939
6:00 P. M.
BLUEFIELD STATE TEACHERS COLLEGE
Bluefield, West Virginia
Bachelor of Science in Commercial Education
Harry T. Boyd
Bachelor of Science in Elementary Education
Cassie Eldridge Anderson
Alphonse Anthony
Josephine Robinson Armstead
Marion C. Brooks
(Cum Laude)
Benjamin Thomas Clark
Martha M. Davis
Maceo Elbert Early
Eula Forney Farrington
Lelia Tarter Gist
Isam Harry Goodwin
(Cum Laude)
Rubye Luvecia Jones
H. Preston Jones
Vonsteine Haigler Lewis
(Cum Laude)
Stella Channel Minor
Jessie E. Moon
Evangeline Matiel Moss
(Cum Laude)
Mary Julia Palmer
Gladys Jackson Patterson
Ada M. Wright Robinson
Mary E. Robinson
Mary C. Smith
Ethel Huthchins Thompson
Beatrice Lawson Wills
Bachelor of Science in Secondary Education
Theodore T. Coleman* Harold Lloyd Walton
Emma Jane Hill James Theodore Webb
(Cum Laude) Ruth Mai wheeler
James Ulysses Spencer Vannie Harlow Woodg
Persons Completing Requirements
for Standard Normal Certificate
Portia Bradley Cornelia Rucker
Cornelia C. Lewis Margie K. Satterfield
Ivajoe Dickerson Majors Lilly B. Sawyer
Esther Pace Mable Gladys Younger
Alberta Ross Rosalie Warren Smith
*In absentia
P R O G R A M
Academic Procession—
Invocation Rev. A. L. I'olk
Pastor Edwards Memorial Presbyterian Church
Bluefield, West Virginia
"The Voice in the Wilderness" O'Hora
College Choir
Address—"The Challenge to Education in a Democracy"..
Prof. U. II. Prunty
Principal Kimball High School
Kimball, West Virginia
Presentation of Candidates for Degrees Dean G. W. Whiting
Conferring of Degrees Dr. D. T. Murray
Member Negro State Board of Education
Keystone, West Virginia
Danse Macabre—Two Pianos Saint-Saens
Miss Frances Williams and Mr. Charles Nellons
Remarks and Greetings —...Hon. I. J. K. Wells
Secretary of Negro State Board of Education
and Supervisor of Negro Schools
Introduction of Distinguished Guests-
Charge to Graduates President H. L. Dickason
Benediction ReV- Q A Connolly
Associate Professor of Geography
Bluefield State Teachers College
Bluefield State Hymn—
(Audience is invited to sing. Words on back of program.)
BLUEFIELD STATE HYMN
Once again thy name we raise
In accents loud and clear,
Sing we ever more thy praise
Bluefield, our school so dear,
High upon thy terraced hill
We see thee strong and true
And our hearts with courage fill
Our School, Old Gold and Blue.
Upward through the years we'll climb
While ever lifting thee
Thy precepts always in mind
Honor and Loyalty—
Men may come and men may go
And, passing through thy gate
Feel within their hearts a glow
For thee—Dear Bluefield State.
Words and Music by Eugene Jones, '38.
/,
, " y j ;' J j L / , ,
' Stato leo.chors Colleget Bluofield, West Virginia, Wednesday, Augu^t |7
% UJV \jV| £ iI. i JT/V CU Vv
BLUEFIELD STATE TO CONFER 27 DEGREFS
i t* -V
SUPERINTENDENT EARLE C. SMITH TO DELIVER ADDRESS TO GRADUATING CLAS
BLUEFIELD STATE COLLEGE TO !
HOLD FIFTH COMMENCEMENT
Assistant Superintendent
Earle C. Smith, Fayette
County Schools, will address
the graduating class
on Thursday evening, Aug- j
ust S, at 6jOO on the sub- I
ject: "This World of Real- j
ism." j
Mr. Smith received his j
master's degree from the !
University of Pennsylvania,!
and has served as assistant!
superintendent of schools
in Fayette County for three
years.
Twenty-seven students
are listed for graduation, '!
Dean G. W, Whiting will
present the graduates for j
degrees to "be conferred j
"by Dr. D. T, Murray, mem- j
her of the Negro State j
Board of Education. I.J.K.J
Wells, supervisor of Negro j
Schools, will "bring greetings
from the State' Department
of Education.
Rev, Hubert C. Jones,
pastor of tho John Stewart i
M. E, Church, will deliver j
the invocation and Rev. J. ;
R. Washington, pastor of j
the Community Methodist
Church of Pocahontas, will .
pronounce the benediction. j
President H. L. Dickason j
will give the charge to
the graduates, " • •> • |
Music for the occasion j
will be furnished by the [
summer school chorus, who
will sing "I Have a Rendevous
with Life", by O'Hara.j
and "Somebody's Knocking j
ua > \ i I I
W W \/ U
COMMENCEMENT WEEK PROGRAM
INCLUDES PERSONALITY PLAY
The personality club, under
the direction of Miss Alice
G. Taylor, presents a comedy
in one act, entitled "Thanks
Awfully, at their closing
exercises in Arter Hall tonight,
After the play, members
of the club will be
presented certificates of '
merit by President H. L.
Dickason.
This study project was organized
by Miss Mabel S.
Brady, dean of women.
at Your Door," by Dett.
The course is directed by
Mr. C. D. Reece and is accompanied
by Mrs. Luetta L.
Spencer.
Members of this gradtiating
class are largely teachers
who havo continued their
studies for a number of year
and have finally reached thi
degree of proficiency.
Among the honor students
is Mrs. Nannie L. Whittico,
matron and dietitian of the
college, who has a rating of
magna cum laude. Students
who are graduating cum la.ude
are Louise Lovett Hanorick,
Suzanne McClain Slaughter,
Theresa Angela Thornton,
Rogelia Carter Warren, and
Mabel Welch Wims.
The oliiest members of tho
class are Mrs. Virginia 3.
James and Mrs. Elizabeth
Lord.
The' following are candidates
for the collegiate
elementary degree: Emma J,
Allen, Mabel P. Beverly,
Cora L,. Scott, Anthony W,
Continued on Page 3
Sl
KINDERGARTEN DEPARTMENT
OBSERVES ITS OPEN HOUSE
With their regular progran
in progress, the
Bluefield State Teachers
College kindergarten observed
open house on Wednee
day from 900 to 11:30. Ir.
the usual setting where the
blackboards are decorated
with original sketches of
the familiar animals in a
vegetable circus and with
pictorial illustrations of
well known nursery rhymesi
instructors, student teachers
and kindergarten pupil;
received their guests.
Unit of Study
To develop ideals for
life in the home setting,
the interest of the class
lias been centered on a
home-life unit. One means
of developing this unit wa
the construction of a smal'
house, painted and beautif:
T/ith window boxes, a lawn,
the seed for which was
planted by the pupils and
a gravel walk leading to
the front door,. Looking
inside the miniature house
the visitors saw papered
walls and four rooms completely
furnished, even
to colorful rugs on the
floors, and dainty curtains
at the windows. The
idea of the unit was further
conveyed through
bulletin board illustration
of neat houses and wellkept
lawns and of ideal
rooms.
Memory rhymes and meaningful
little songs brough
clearly to the children's
minds the responsibility
of each individual in effecting
ideal home life au
the value of system and
order in making the work 0a.
the week go smoothly.
To insure fullest appreciation
of the program,
student teachers displayed
Continued on Page 3
Pago 2
HHE SUMMER PLASH
Bluefield State Teachers College. Bluefield. West Virginia, Wednesday, August 7» 19*10
STAPP
Mary A. Parker Editor
Emma J. Allen—-Co-editor
India 1, Gilbert-Bus.Mgr.
Associate Editors:
Calantha Snipes —Art
Makeup
Lula Phelps— —City
Gertrude Irving-Society
Saxton Cobb -Sports
C-OODBYE, GRADUATES
Class of I9L0, as you
leave Bluefield State Teach
ers College, our best wishes
go with you. May these da^s
be your happiest ones.
Whatever your closing tasks
may be, your varied duties
of the week, may this work
be accomplished without
such great effort as the
summer courses have require!
All work requires time,
thought, and faithful application;
and we know that
you have had many things to
do in order to reach the
coveted goal. May you derive
joy and satisfaction
in the consciousness of
work well done.
Hot pnly have you gained
much from Bluefield State
Teachers College, but you
have also given much. You
will be missed and the
mark of your efforts and
personality will be recognized
by those who remain
as a part of the general
progress of the college.
May this milestone in
your career not be the end
HOW CHILDREN LEARN SAPSTY
Children learn safety
through the following means:
imitation, observation, association,
and experimentation graduating class on Sunday,
Things done automatically,
proper habits and skills are
built up through repetition,
motivation and intense action.
Children develop through
play. Safety patrolling can
be taught through games or
other playful activities.
Skill in these can be acquired
only through constant
repetition.
To get the best results in
the teaching of "safety" we
as teachers must build up th<
proper attitudes in our pupils.
We can appoint one of the
larger children of each family
or group tp keep strict
supervision over the smaller
ones on the way to and from
school. Children are anxious
to accomplish something
when they are made
responsible.
CHURCH MEWS
Rev. A. L. Polk, pastor
of the Presbyterian Church,
delivered the sermon to the
August *+. Music was furnished
by the summer school
chorus, under the direction
of Mr. C. D. Roeco, with
Mrs. Luetta L. Spencer as
accompanist.
Youth Day will be observed
at Mt. Zion Baptist
Church Sunday, August 11.
A special program has been
arranged for the day by
Prof. Charles Cardwell and
the youth of the church.
of your education, but may
you ever strive to attain"
the higher plains of living
for which further knowledge
prepares you. The goal of
life is not reached by one
single bound, but is attained
by suecesive steps.
May the attainment of your
immediate goal be an incentive
to your future efforts
and an inspiration
xor further achievement.
TO SUGGEST TO TEE CLASS
op 19U0
Class Song:
It's all over now and
I won't worry.
Con'td. in column 3
TEAM YOU, BEAU WHITING
Dear Miss Parker:
Behind the scene the craftsman
builds the setting, as
well as the scene, for the
last act. This is what you
have done in the building of
our many programs during the
summer. Por these services,
I wish to thank you.
I ©specially want to congratulate
you on the Summer
fflash of which you are editor.
This has been a very
fine contribution to the
life of the summer school
and it is due largely to the
ability, intelligence and
willingness to work 011 the
part of you as editor-inchief
and your associates.
Please convey to then my
thanks and appreciation for
this accomplishment.
EDITOR OP MCDOWELL TITOS
PAYS VISIT TO PUSH OPPICE
Mrs. M, T. Whittico,
editor of the McDowell
Times, was a visitor in the
Since rely yours,
W. Whiting
Dean
Dear Mrs. Moats:
Prom every corner of the
campus, I have received very
splendid statements concerning
your work on the Summer
Plash. I want to commend
you and your staff for the
very fine paper. The paper
editorial offices of the
Summer Plash on Tuestay,
August b. She addressed
the class in journalism
on the ethics of Negro
business, stressing the
ethics of newspaper writin,
and also spoke of the opportunities
for Negro youti
in newspaper work.
"The Negro newspaper is
a cooperative enterprise,
just as any other business"
said Mrs. Whittico, 11 and
it is our duty to cooperate
in order to make it a success.
It is only through
our own newspapers that wo
learn the finer points of
Negro life."
is an event now and all
of us look fi
ting the fir:
forward to got-
•s-c copy off
the press to devour the
news therein. Please convey
to your staff my
sincere appreciation.
Very truly yours,
G. W. Whiting
Doan
Class Will:
To you, I Give All of
My Life.
Class Prophesy:
I'll Never Be The Same.
Class Motto:
Singing in the Rain.
Page 3
THE SUMMER PLASH
Bluefield State. Teachers College. Bluefield. West Virginia, Wednesday, August 7,19 'Q
HILLTOP TEAM SWAMPS CAMPUS
VIKINGS IN DOUBLE HEADER
BLUEPIELD STATE COLLEGE TO
HOLD PIPTH COMMENCEMENT
Continued from Page I
Calloway, Gertrude Carter
Chapman, Virginia Brown*
Douthit, India Thomas Gilbert,
Louise Lovett Hambrick,
Virginia B. James, Esther
Smith Johnson, Elizabeth
Lord, Sallie Mae McClendon,
Pannie Webb Redd, Almcta
Elizabeth Ridley, Suzanne
McClain Slaughter, Eleanor
B. Sutton, Maude11a White
Taylor, Theresa Angela
Thornton, Regelia Carter
Warren, Mabel Welch Wims,
Elizabeth Ann Witten,
Xenia Lucile Wiseman, and
Nannie L. Whittico.
Those receiving degrees
in secondary education are:
Robert Philip Edmomdson,
Herbert Marvin Perguson,
Hiawatha Nokomis Harding,
and Carolyn Lee McNorton.
COMMENCEMENT WEEK PROGRAM
INCLUDES PERSONALITY PLAY
Continued from Page 1
a clear statement of their
aims and their plans for
reaching them.
Student teachers who wore
in charge are Mrs. Estolla
Belcher, Mrs. Gertrudo Irving,
Mrs. Nannie L. Whittico,
Miss Prances Prancis, Mrs.
Nannie White, Mr. James
Stevenson,
Miss Alma Adams is critic
teacher in the kindergarten.
The pupils of the kindergarten
department and. the
students teachers will have c
picnic in Coleman Grove
Thursday morning, from ten
until twelve.
Captain Thomas Jefferson
and his Hilltop boys
defeated the Campus Vikings
Saturday, in a double
header softball game. To
date, the scores for the
game a.ro not known; probably
they will be available
for individual inspection,
but not for
publication, when the
business department has
completed its tabulation.
SAFETY CLASS COMPLETES UNIT
The class in safety education
began its program for
the week with an address
delivered by Dr. W. M.
Wright on heart diseases
and their causes. Dr.
Wright pointed out to the
class that yearly physical
examinations wore very
necessary in making health
checks.
On Tuesday fire chief
J, W. McCiure spoke to the
class on "Safety and Pire
Drills".
On Wednesday Chief C. N.
Wilson lectured on safety
to motorists and pedestrians.
Thursday's lecture, to
be given by Judge Scott,
will close the program in
safety education for the
19^+0 summer session.
BIG BLUES TO PLAY YELLOW
JACKETS IN HOMECOMING GAME
' The homecoming football
game will be played on November
2, 19*4-0, in 3. I. Bowl,
between the Yellow Jackets
of Wost Virginia State College
and the 3ig Blues.
THE 19U0 FOOTBALL SCHEDULE
Home
October 12— ~N. C. State
October 26 Morgan State
November 2 —W. Va» State
November l6 St. Augustine
November 23——St. Paul N &I
Away
October 5 Virginia State
October 19—Hampton Institute
November 9——<1 • *-*• Smith ^
November 23 Shaw University;
Mrs. Esther Johnson,
Miss Rcubena Stultz, and
Mrs. Virginia B. Douthit
were dinner guests of
Mrs.' Daniel Martin of
Switchback last Wednesday,
Miss Alice Taylor and her
house guests were complimented
with a tea at the homo of Mr.
and Mrs. C. C. Carter on
Bland Street on Tuesday
evening.
Mr. Carter is principal
of Lawson Street School.
Miss Cora Scott is going to
Chicago; while there she
will attend the American
Negro Exposition
Mrs. India Gilbert, president
of the graduating class,
is planning to take a- motor
trip to Now York a.nd Now
Jersey before sho resumes
her work this fall.
Miss Sallie McClendon is
visiting several points in
Virginia.
HISTORY OP STORER COLLEGE
RELATED BY ANDREW KING
Storer College began in
1S65, after the Civil War,
through the efforts of
Lincoln, Beckett and
Brackett, his cousin.
They were given the privilege
of using an old frame
building at Harper's Ferry
West Virginia. Beckett
and Brackett found the
white people principally
interested in Negro education.
The school students in
the beginning were practically
old men and women
who had been slaves. In
the beginning, Storer College
was merely a high
school. In 1367, John B,
Storer of Maine, donated
$10,000 to the college,
honco it got its namo
Storer College. The
churches, clubs and other
organizations became more
interested in the college
and began donating funds
toward this institution.
Institutions like Harvar
Yale, and Dartmouth sent
student teachers to Storer
to study the Ncgros' condition.
Storer has just
recently become a fourycar
college. Formerly
it gave the two—year norma
courso.
The college is 72 years
old. President McDonald
has been head of the institution
for thirty-nine
years.
There is a bit of
romance connected with
Storer College,
Literature is the thought
of thinking souls.
-Carlyle
Page U
THE SUM?®?. PLASH
Bluefield State Teachers College, BluefielA, West Virginia,. Wednesday, August 7»19^0
MISS ELEANOR 3. SUTTON
IS HONORED AT SHOWER
A miscellaneous shower
honoring Miss Eleanor B.
Sutton will he held in the
Lewis Hall on Wednesday of
this week from six until
seven thirty p. m. She is
to he the hride of Roger
P. Gordon of Philadelphia,
Pennsylvania. The wedding
will take place August 2 k , •
JAMBOREE BHDS ENJOYABLE
SUMMER SOCIAL SEASON
On last Friday evening
the social and recreational
committee gave its final
jamboree for the 19^-0 summer
session in Arter gymnasium.
The guests spent the
evening from eight to
twelve in playing bridge
and other card games, and
in swinging and swaying to
the rhythmic tunes of Tony
Swing Swing and his hand.
COELLA ROBINSON PLEASES
LARGS AUDIENCE
A large and appreciative
audience listened to the
recital of Miss Coella Robinson
and the summer chorus
on Tuesday evening, August
6, Miss Robinson showed
very good range, volume,
and tone qualities. Among
the numbers rendered were
the following: "Caro Mio
Ben,"by G. Giordoni, "Nobody
Knows the Trouble I
See", by Klickman, "The
Wind's in the South Today",
by J. P. Scott, and "Motherloss
Child", by Klickman.
As an encore she sang "At
Dawning". All of the numbers
were delightfully received
with generous applause
by the audience.
This project was an expression
on the part of the
music department and the
college, not only to encourage
Miss Robinson, but
also to stimulate other
students with talent.
Miss Robinson will resume
her studies in music at
Bluefield State Teachers
College this fall.
SURPRISE BIRTHDAY PARTIBS
BRIGHTEN SOCIAL CALENDAR
Parents of Prances Francis
Entertain at Gary Home
Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Francis
of Gary, W. Va. entertained
their daughter, Prances L.
Francis, of Bluefield State
Teachers College with a, surprise
birthday party on Monday,
August 5.
The evening was spent with
cards, other games, dancing
and refreshments.
Those present from the
campus were: Mrs. Hattie
Heath, Misses Mary Paeke,
Lucy Spencer, Olive Smith,
Georgiana Hill, Elizabeth
Witten, Reuhena Stultz, and
Sarah .and Nettle Brooks.
Tablemates Compliment
Mrs, Ruth Inez Murray
Beautiful gladiolas lent
color and attractiveness to
a surprise birthday party
given in the south sun parlor!
of the girl:;1 dormitory on
Tuesday evening, in honor of
Mrs. Ruth Inez Murray, a
student in the summer session
of the college.
The party was given by Mrs.
Murray's tablemates. Refreshjments
were served o,nd the
guests spent an enjoyable
evening in games of cards ondj
singing.
Those present were: Misses '
Dorothy Brown, Elizabeth
Witten, Reuhena Stultz,
Eleanor B. Sutton, Cornelia j
Williams, Arnetta Lord,
Mrs. Fozio S. Lanton, and
Mrs. Flossie Clay Saunders, j
BAPTIST WOMAN'S CONVENTION
TO MEET AT THE COLLEGE
The forty-seventh, session
of the Woman's Baptist Mis- t
sionary and Educational Con- k
vention of West Virginia wil \
he held at Bluefield State
Teachers College August 13,
lU, and 15. Among those
assisting with the music
for the convention are
Mrs. W. 0. Moore, Mrs. G.
H. Higginbotham, Mrs. Mamie
Lyle, Mr. William Greeno,
and Mrs. Alice Robinson.
Miss Coella Robinson is
also to give special music
for the convention.
Welcome addresses will
ho made by President H. L,
Dickason, Dr. J, C. Kingslow,
Rev, John F. Little,
and Hon. Wm. G. Snyder,
mayor of the city.
Dean G. W. Whiting and
Professor J. Edward Dickerson
will give inspirational
addresses on behalf of
the college.
Mrs. N. L. Whittico will
speak for the Young People''
Division.
3ALTIM0REANS VISIT
3LUEFIELD STATS
Kiss Alice G. Taylor,
acting supervisor of elementary
education, has as
her guests for this week
Miss Eva M. Taylor, Mr. S.
Leroy Taylor, and Mr. and
Mrs. W. E. Payne.
Miss Tay1or, Mr, Taylor
and Mr. and Mrs. Payne are
all from Baltimore, Maryland
and arc relatives of
Miss Alice G. Taylor,
SCHOOL PHYSICIAN TAKES
OVER LOCAL HOSPITAL
Dr. W. M. Wright, a prominent
physician and surgeon,
has taken over the management
of Brown's Hospital,
formerly the Lomax Hospital.
Dr. Wright is a graduate
of Lincoln University and
the Howard Medical College,
Plans are under way for a
well equipped staff of physicians
and nurses. A general
renovation of the building
will be under way.
MRS. LOLA MACK ATTENDS
MEETING OF CALANTHE
Mrs. Lola Mack ha,s returned
from the University
of Cincinnati after spending
a very successful summer
studying there. Last
week she attended the meeting
of the Courts of Calanthe
in Huntington, W. Va.
Mrs. Mack has been presiding
officer of this
order for twelve years,
and is now serving her
thirteenth year.
) 61 214
d 3 years'
Pj in Senior
sated M 2d T
orature and 3 years'
7:
j o£English in Junior High
fl) ;M ISF'T (Lyman) B1214
i in Litiratuv-.;. 2 Mjs in Composition,
1 teaching j '
ITods of Teaching English to Immi-
(3-) ' DM 2d T (Clark) B1 107
! 3 Mjs in Education and English and the
f. instructor
2A The Teaching of
Secondary Mathematics:
The Junior High
School (3)
. M 1st T
(Myers) Bl 210
Prereq.: 3 Mjs in Junior College
Mathematics
2B The Teaching of
Secondary Mathematics:
The Senior High
School (3)
M 2d T
(Myers) Bl 210
Prereq.: 3 Mjs in Junior College
Mathematics
5 History of Mathematics
(3)
Mj (or M 1st T)
(Myers) Bl 107
Prereq.: 3 Mjs of College
Mathematics
14 A The Teaching of English in Grades IV,
V, VI (2) M 2d T (Kibbe) Bi 107
16A The Teaching of Reading in Grades IV,
V, VI (2) M 2d T (Kibbe) Bl 107
52A The Teaching of High-Scho< 1
Chemistry (2)
M 1st T (Cunningham) Bl li 5
Prereq.: Chemistry 1, 2, and 3,
equivalent
10 A The Teaching of General
Science (2)
M 1st T (Cunningham) Bl 113
Prereq.: 2 Mjs of Biological Science and
2 Mjs of Physical Science
51A The Teaching of High-School
Physics (2)
M 1st T (Lohr) B! 113
Prereq.: 3 Mjs of Physics
51B The Teaching of High-School
Physics (2)
M 1st T (Lohr) B! 113
Prereq.: 3 Mjs of Physics and Natural
Science 51A, or consent of instructor
2 A The Teaching of
Secondary Mathematics:
The Junior High
School (3)
M 2d T
(Breslich) Bl 210
Prereq.: 3 Mjs in Junior College
Mathematics
2B The Teaching of
Secondary Mathematics:
The Senior High
School (3)
M 1st T
(Breslich) Bl 210
Prereq.: 3 Mjs in Junior College
Mathematics
14 A The Teaching of Physiology
and Hygiene (2)
M 1st T (Frank) BI 303
Prereq.: Physiology 0 or equivalent
14B The Teaching of Physiology
and Hygiene (2)
M 2d T (Frank) BI 303
Prereq.: Physiology 0 or equivalent
31A Biology in Secondary Schools
(3)
M 1st T (Downing Bl 303
Prereq.: ZoSlogy 1, Botany 1 and 5, or
equivalent
31B Botany and Zoology in Secondary
Schools (3)
M 2d T (Downing) Bl 303
Prereq.: ZoClogy 1, Botany 1 and 5, or
equivalent
GEOGRAPHY
5 A The Teaching of
Geography in Secondary
Schools (3)
M 1st T
(Leppard) Bl 210
Prereq.: 3 Mjs in Education
and Geography
5B The Teaching of
Geography in Secondary
Schools (3)
M 2d T
(Leppard) Bl 210
Prereq.: 3 Mjs in Education
and Geography
3 A Primary-School Methods:
Spelling, and Writing (2)
Limited to 40 (Li
26A Problems in Curriculum-M
M 2d T (Tei
Prereq.: 3 Mjs in Education and
Primary Education
29 B Administration and Supervisii
tice Teaching (3)
M 1st T
Prereq.: 3 Mjs in Eduoatioi
1A Introduction to Kindergarten-Primary
Education (1) M 2d T (Martin) Bl 110
3B Primary-School Methods: Reading (2)
Sec. a M 1st T (Lucas) Bl 110
Limited to 40
14 A Literature in Kindergarten and Primary
Grades (2) M 1st T
Sec. a (Townsend) Bl 194
Limited to 40
30A Kindergarten-Primary Supervision:
Constructive Criticism (3)
M 1st T (Temple) Bl 189
30 B Kindergarten-Primary Supervision:
General Problems (3)
M 2d T (Temple) Bl 189
6 A Curriculum for Kindergarten and First
Grade Based on Children's Experiences
(2) M 1st T (Martin) Bl 110
Prereq.: 2 Mja in Kindergarten-Primary Education
r equivalent
14 A Literature in Kindergarten and Primary
Grades (2) M 1st T
Sec. 6 Limited to 40 (Townsend) B1194
23A The Supervision of Language in Grades
I-VI (3) M 1st T (Besley) Bl 189
Prereq.: 2 years of professional training including
Mjs in Education and Kindergarten-Primary
Education
23B The Supervision of Reading in Grades
I-VI (3) M 2d T (Besley) Bl 189
Prereq.: 2 years of professional training including
Mjs in Education and Kindergarten-Primary
Education
44 A Organizing Geographical
Material for Elementary
Schools (3)
M 1st T
(E. Parker) Bl 210
Prereq.: e Geography 4 or 40
44 B Organizing Geographical
Material for Elementary
Schools (3)
M 2d T
(E. Parker) Bl 210
Prereq.: e Geography 4 or 40
4 A The Technique of
Teaching Elementary
Geography (2)
M 1st T
(E. Parker) Bl 210
Advised prereq.: Geography 1
4B The Technique of
Teaching Elementary
Geography (2)
M 2d T
(E. Parker) Bl 210
Advised prereq.: Geography 1
70 A Modern Tendencies in
the Teaching of Geography
in England (3)
M 2d T
(Young) Bl 210
Prereq.: 3 Mjs of Geography
and permission of the Departmental
Adviser
3:30
7 A The Organization jof Elementary
Science '(Nature-
Study) in the Grade i Ciirricu-
* lum (3)
M 1st T (Franjc) Bl 303
Prereq.: 3 Mjs representing both
biological and physical sciences
7B The Organization of Elementary
Science ; (Nature-
Study) in the Grade Curriculum
(3)
M 2d T (Frank) BI 303
Prereq.: 3 Mjs representing bath
biological and physical science*j — fej-.'
KINDERGARTEN-PR M
EDUCATION
iy) Bl 189
21A Advanced Design (2) M 2d T
2 hours (Morse) HHB 153
Limited to 35
Prereq.: Design 20 or equivalent
21B Advanced Design (2) M 1st T
2 hours (Morse) HHB 153
Limited to 35
Prereq.: Design 20 or equivalent
50B Elementary Pottery (2) M 1st T
2 hours (Whitford) HHB 155
Lab. fee, $1.50 Limited to 15
51B Advanced Pottery (2) M 2d T
2 hours (Whitford) HHB 155
Lab. fee, $1.50 Limited to 15'
Prereq.: Art Education 50
62 A Special Methods in Art Education in Elementary
Schools (2) M 1st T -•
2 hours (Todd) HHB 146"
Limited to 25
Prereq.: Art Education 5 and 20, or equivalent
21A See 8:00
21B See 8:00
50B See 8:00
51B See 8:00
62A See 8:00
12A Advanced Drawing and Painting (2)
2 hours M 2d T (Morse) HHB 153
Limited to 35
Prereq.: Drawing and Painting 5 or equivalent
12B Advanced Drawing and Painting (2)
2 hours M 1st T (Morse) HHB 153
Limited to 35
Prereq.: Drawing and Painting 5 or equivalent
6B Curriculum for Second and Third
Grades (2) M 1st T (Martin) Bl 110
Limited to 40
Prereq.: 2 Mjs in Kindergarten-Primary Education,
or equivalent
14A Literature in Kindergarten and Primary
Grades (2) _ M 2d T (Martin) Bl 110
Limited to 40
29 A Normal-School Curricula for the Training
of Teachers (3)
M 1st T (Temple) Bl 189
Prereq.: 2 years of professional training including
3 Mjs in Education
29 B Administration and Supervision of Practice
Teaching (3)
M 2d T (Besley) Bl 189
Prereq.: 3 Mjs in Education
12A See 10:00
12B See 10:00
60 A Supervisor's
M 1st T
Prereq.: 3 Mjs ii
cation
60 B Supervisor'!
M 2d T
Prereq.: 3 Mjs in
Education
5 A Manual Arts (2) M 1st T
Sec. a _ (Cameron) Bl 286
Limited to 30
16A Primary-School Methods: Number (2)
M 2d T (Liek) Bl 110
23 B The Supervision of Reading v Grades
I-VI (3) M 1st T (Bamberger) Bl 110
Prereq.: 2 years of professional training including
3 Mjs in Education and Kindergarten-Primary Education
3B Primary-School Methods: Reading (2)
Sec. b M 1st T (Hardy) Bl 189
Limited to 40
5 A Manual Arts (2)
Sec. b M 1st T (Cameron) Bl 286
repeated M 2d T (Liek) Bl 286
Limited to 30
24 A The Supervision of Community Life,
History, and Civics in Grades I—III (3)
M 1st T (Storm) Bl 194
Prereq.: 2 years of, professional training including
3 Mjs in Education and Kindergarten-Primary Education
24 B The Supervision of Community Life,
History,<and Civics in Grades IV-VI (3)
M 2d T (Storm) Bl 194
2A Primary-School Methods: Nature-
Study (2) M 1st T (Champion) Bi 189
Limited to 35
3B Primary-School Methods: Reading (2)
• lM 2d T _ (Storm) BI 194
-Limited to 40
4A Community Life, History, and Civics
in the Primary Grades (2)
M 1st T (Storm) Bl 194
28A The Project Method in Primary Education
(3) M 1st T (Bamberger) Bl 110
Prereq.: 3 Mjs in Education and Kindergarten-
Primary Education
15A Physical Education: .Plays and
Games (2) M ist T (Adams) HHB 262
Limited to 50
s Course in Art Education (3)
(Whitford) Bl 400
i Education or 3 Mjs in Art Edu-
: Course in Art Education (3)
(Whitford) Bl 400
Education, Household Art, or Art
-7"
5 A Introductory Drawing and Painting (2) <
2 hours M lst/T (Zesbaugh) Bl 400
Limi^gfl to 35
5B Introductory .Drawing and Painting (2)
2 hours / M 2d T (Zesbaugh) Bl 400
.. Limited to 35
16A Color' "in Pictorial and Decorative
Art (3) M 1st T
2 hours > (Williams) HHB 153
Limited to 25
Prereq.: 3 Mjs in Art Education, or Design 20 and!
Home Economics 135 and 141
16B Color in Pictorial and Decorative
Art (3) M 2d T
2 hours _ (Williams) HHB 153
Limited to 25
Prereq.: 3 Mjs in Art Education, or Design 20 and
Home Economics 135 and 141
55 A Elementary Modeling (2) M 2d T
2 hours (Haseltine) HHB 154
Lab. fee, $0.75 Limited to 15
55 B Elementary Modeling (2) M 1st T
2 hours (Haseltine) HHB 154
Lab. fee, $0.75 Limited to 15
56 A Advanced Modeling (2) M 2d T
2 hours (Haseltine) HHB 154
Lab. fee, $0.75 Limited to 15
Prereq.: Elementary Modeling 55 or equivalent
56 B Advanced Modeling (2) M 1st T
2 hours (Haseltine) HHB 154
Lab. fee, $0.75 Limited to 15
Prereq.: Elementary Modeling 55 or equivalent
5A See 12:30
5B See 12:30
16A See 12:30
16B See 12:30
55A See 12:30
55B See 12:30
56A See 12:30
56B See 12:30
1:30
20 A Elementary General Design (2)
M 2d T (Zesbaugh) BI 400
"2 hours _ Limited to 35
20 B Elementary General Design (2)
M 1st T (Zesbaugh) Bl 400
2 hoars Limited to 35
23 A Industrial Arts (2) M 2d T
2 hours
Lab. fee, $1.50
23 B Industrial Arts (2)
2 hours
Lab. fee, $1.50
(Williams) HHB 153
Limited to 25
M 1st T
(Williams) HHB 153
Limited to 25
20A See 2:30
20B See 2:30
23 A See 2:30
23B See 2:30
1. Cobb Lecture Hall
2. Blake Hall
3. Gates Hall
4. Goodspeed Hall
5. Kent Chemical
Laboratory
6. liyerson Physical
Laboratory
7. Snell Hall
8. Foster Hall |
9. Beecher Hall A
10. Kelly Hall
11. Green Hall H
12. Walker Museum V
13. President's House®
14. Haske1 .'Museum •
15. Physiology
16. Anatomy
17. ZoQlogy ^
18. Botany
19. Ellis Hall
20. Hitchcock Hall
21. University Press
22. Power House
23. High-School
Gymnasium
24. Emmons Blaine Hall
25. Hutchinson Hall
26. Reynolds Club
27. Mitchell Tower
28. Leon Mandel
Assembly Hall
29. Law School
30. Lexington Hall
31. Bartlctt Gymnasium
32. Belfield Hall
33. University High
School Boys' Clubhouse
34. Psychological Laboratories
35. Kimbarlc Hall
36. Harper Memorial
Library
37. Athletic Grandstand
38. Classics
39. Rosenwald Hall
40. Ricketts Laboratory
41. Ida Noyes Hall
42. Warehouse
43. Ricketts South
44. Commerce and
Administration
45. Quadrangle Club
THE UNIVERSITY OF CHICAGO
Key to Buildings
Numbered in Chronological Order
THE SCHOOL OF COMMERCE AND ADMINISTRATION
SUMMER QUARTER, 1924
ELEMENTARY COURSES
(Conferring no credit to
graduate students)
Pol. Econ. 0 Principles of Economics
I: Industrial Society
Mj (or M 1st T)
Sec. a (Taylor) C 10 B
8;(
9:00
INTERMEDIATE COURSES
(Conferring half-credit to
graduate students)
Pol. Econ. 3 Financial Organization
of Society (Mj (or M 1st T)
Sec. a (Keister) C 8 B
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 1 or 18 Mja_
Pol. Econ. 10 Accounting Principles
Mj (or M 1st T)
(Yntema) C 13 A
(Identical with C, & A. 100)
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 0 or 18 Mjs
C. & A. 01 Business Administration
Mj (or M 1st T)
Sec. a (Yntema) Com 205
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 0 or 18 Mjs
Psych. 1 Introductory Psychology
Sec. a (Blatz) Psy
Prereq.: 9 Mjs
10:00
Pol. Econ. 1 Principles of Economics
II: Value and Distribution
in Industrial Society
Mj (or M 1st T)
Sec. o (Pyle) C 8 D
Sec. b ( ) C 10 D
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 0 or 18 Mjs
ADVANCED COURSES
C. & A. 72 Business Forecasting Mj (Cox) Com 310
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 3, C. & A. 37 and 100
C. & A. 80 Market Management Mj (Barnes) Com 105
Prereq.: 36 Mjs or 27 Mjs with average of 3 g. p.
C. & A. 83 Purchasing Mj (Dinsmore) Com 312
Prereq.: C. & A. 80 or equiva ent
C. & A. 100 See Pol. Econ. 10
C. & A. 101,102 Managerial Use of Standards and Records
DMj (or DM either T) (Palmer) Com 101
8:00-10:00
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 10 or C. & A. 100
C. & A. 104 The^College Curriculum in Accounting
M 1st T (McKinsey) Com 205
Prereq.: C. & A. 102 or consent of instructor
C. & A. 12T Teaching of Stenography and Typewriting
DM 1st T (Brewington) Com 207
8:00-10:00
Prereq.: Knowledge of theory of shorthand and touch typewriting
Pol. Econ. 40 Trade Unionism Mj (Millis) C 11 c
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 4 or equivalent
Pol. Econ. 68 International Economic Policies
Mj (Viner) C 17 c
Prereq.: 27 Mjs
Pol. Econ. 130 The High School Business Course: Curriculum
and Materials Mj (Grinstead) C 9 c
Prereq.: 18 Mjs
Pol. Econ. 3 Financial Organization
of Society Mj (or M 1st T)
Sec. b (Keister) C 8 B
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 0 or 18 Mjs
Pol. Econ. 4 The Worker in Modern
Economic Society
Mj (or M 1st T)
Sec. a (Forsberg) C 11 c
:. b ( ) C 11 D
(Ivey) Com 105
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 0 or 18 Mjs
C. & A. 12T See 8:00
C. & A. 81 Retail Store Management
DM 1st T
9:00-11:00
Prereq.: C. & A. 80 or equivalent
C. & A. 101,102 See 8:00
C. & A. 105 The Teaching of Accounting in Secondary Schools
DM 1st T (McKinsey) Com 310
9:00-11:00
Pol. Econ. 52 Railroad Problems Mj (Clark) C 6 D
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 1 or 27 Mjs
Pol. Econ. 67 Federal and State Taxation Problems
Prereq.: 27 Mjs Mj (Viner) C 17 C
Pol. Econ. 90 Statistical Theory and Method
Mj (Field) C 10 B
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 9 or equivalent
Pol. Econ. 7 Risk and Risk-Bearing
in Modern Industrial Society
Mj (Nerlove) Com 310
Prereq.: Pol. Eoon. 0 or 18 Mjs
Zool. 5 Evolution, Genetics, and
Eugenics Mj (or M either T)
(Bellamy) Z 14
11:00
C. & A. 43 The
Mj
Pol. Econ.
tistics
Introduction to Sta-
Mj
(Field) C 11 B
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 0 or 18 Mjs
's Administration of Labor
(Forsberg) Com 205
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 4 or 27 Mjs
C . & A . 81 See 9:00
C. & A. 105 See 9:00
C. & A. 95 Business Communication Mj(Troxell) Com 207
Prereq.: Eng. 3 or permission of instructor
C. & A. 106 Accounting Theory DM 1st T (Paton) Com 101
10:00-12:00
Prereq.: C. & A. 102 or consent of instructor
Pol. Econ. 16 History of Economic Thought
Mj XClark) C 6 D
Prereq.: 4 Mjs in Pol. Econ.
Pol. Econ. 41 The State in Relation to Labor
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 4 or equivalent Mj (Millis) C 11 D
Pol. Econ. 84A Transportation Mj (Sorrell) C 14 A
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 0 or 18 Mjs
Pol. Econ. 0 Principles of Eco-
12:3
nomics I: Industrial Society
Mj (or M 1st T)
Sec. b ( ) C 14 A
1:30
C. & A. 01 Business Administration
Mj (or M 1st T)
Sec. b (Hodge) Com 205
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 0 or 18 Mjs
2:30
Geog. 1 Elements of Geography
DM 1st T (Jones) Ro 28
2:30-4:30
Geog. 3 Economic and Commercial
Geography
DM 2d T (Jones) Ro 28
2:30-4:30
Prereq.: Geog. 1 with grade not lower than C
C. & A. 87 Foreign Trade Mj (Sorrell) Com 207
Prereq.: C. & A. 80 or equivalent
C. & A. 96 Business Correspondence Mj (Troxell) Com 205
Prereq.: Eng. 3 or equivalent
C. & A. 106 See 10:00
Pol. Econ. 52 X The Valuation of Fixed Assets"
Mj (Canning) C 14 A
Prereq.: 2 Mjs in Accounting
Pol. Econ. 131 Teaching of High School Economics
M 1st T (Grinstead) Com 105
Prereq.: 18 Mjs
(Hodge) Com 101
C. & A. 85 Commercial Cost Accounting
Mj
Prereq.: C. & A. 81 and 102
C. & A. 112 Business Law I: An Introduction to the Study of
Law and Business Mj (Christ) Com 205
Prereq.: 18 Mjs
C. & A. 121 Industrial Cost Accounting
DM 2d T (Mitchell) Com 310
12:30-2:30
Prereq.: C. & A. 102. 120
Pol. Econ. 26 Agricultural Economic Problems
Mj (Duddy) Com 207
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 1 or equivalent
C. & A. 11 Government and Business
M 1st T
(Pomeroy) Com 101
Pol. Econ. 5 Social Control of Business
M 2d T
(Christ) Com 101
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 0 and 1
C. & A. £
Mj
Terminal Marketing of Farm Products
Limited to 10 (Duddy) Com 207
Prereq.: C. & A. 80 or equivalent
C. & A. 113 Business Law II Mj (1st T, Christ; 2d T, Pomeroy)
Prereq.: 18 Mjs Com 205
Pol. Econ. 31A Banking Integration and the Federal Reserve
System Mj (Preston) C 13 A
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 3 or equivalent
C. & A. 46 A Judging Human Character
M 1st T (Kornhauser) Com 205
Prereq.: Psych. 1
C. & A. 46B Personnel Methods in High School and College
M 2d T (Kornhauser) Com 205
Prereq.: 3 Mjs in Psychology or Education
C. & A. 114 Business Law III
Mj ( Pomeroy) Com 101
Prereq.: 18 Mjs
Pol. Econ. 38 A Foreign Exchange
M 1st T (Preston) C 13 A
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 3 or equivalent
Pol. Econ. 38 B Agricultural Finance
M 2d T (Preston) C 13 A
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 3 or equivalenj
Pol. Econ. 45 Types of Economic Organizatif
M 1st T ^^Jfouglas) Com 207
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 1 o
C. & A.; ^nance
!£h) Com 205
THE GRADUATE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL SERVICE
SUMMER QUARTER, 1924
INTERMEDIATE COURSES
(Conferring half-credit to graduate
Psych. 7 Theories of Personality S.S.A. 14 Social Treatment of Crime
Mj (or M either T) (Robinson) Psy Mj (or M either T) (Beeley) C 15
ADVANCED COURSES
3 Mjs in Psych.
Psych. 12A Principles of Mental Tests
M 2d T (Thurstone) Psy
Prereq.: Psych. 6 or its equivalent
Sociol. 6 Modern Cities
Mj (or M either T)
(Bedford) HM M 11
Materials fee, $3.50
Prereq.: 18 Mjs including Sociol. 1
Prereq.: 27 Mis
Hse. Adm. 22 The Child and the State
Mj (or M either T)
(Breckinridge) C 11
Prereq.: 27 Mjs
Philos. 27 Social and Political Philosophy
Mj (or M either T) L (west
(1st T, Smith; 2d T, Tufts
Pol. Econ. 40 Trade Unionism
Mj (Millis) C 11
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 4 or its equivalent
Pol. Econ. 4 The Worker in Modern Economic
Society Mj (or M 1st T)
Sec. a (Forsberg) C 11 c
Sec. b ( ) C 11 D
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 1 or 27 Mjs
Pol. Econ. 90 Statistical Theory and MetJ
Mj (Field) C j
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 9 or equivalent
Pol. Sci. 40 Public Administration
Mj (or M either T) (White) (C,
Materials fee, $2
Sociol. 80 General Introduction to Anthropology
Mj (Cole) Ro 2
S. 5.A. 26 Principles of Community Org
tion M 2d T (Steiner) f
Prereq.: 27 Mjs f
Pt , Econ. 41 The State in Relation tq
Mj (MillisJ
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 4 or Its equivauqj
Socu, . 30 Social Attitudes
L'i (Faris) I
Materials fee, $2
Pol. Econ. £
Mj
I Introduction to Statistics
(Field) C l l B
Materials fee, $3.50
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 0 or 18 Mjs
Zool. 5 Evolution, Genetics, and Eugenics
Mj (or M either T) (Bellamy) Z 14
Pi^req.: 36 Mjs or consent of inst'
00
S.S.A. 21 Methods of social Inve^l
M 1st T (Abbott]
Materials fee, $2
Prereq.: S.S.A. 1 and S.S.A. 20 I
S.S.A. 26 A Experiments in Con]
Organization
M 2d T (Steiner]
Prereq.: 27 Mjs
Psych. 2 Outlines of Experimental Psychology
Mj (Blatz) Psy
Lab.: 1:30-3:30
Prereq.: Psych. 1
(Young) C 11 A
S.S.A. 25 Social Economics
Mj
Sociol. VI The Family
Mj (or M 1st T)
(BurgessJ HM E 10
Materials fee, $3.50
Prereq.: 27 Mjs including Sociol. 1
S.S.A. 1 A, B Principles of Case Worl
Mj (or M either T) x. A
(1st T, Breckinria0c, T|
Materials fee, $3.50
Prereq.: 36 Mjs or consent of instruB
S.S.A. 2 Problems of Case Analyl
Diagnosis Mj (Young]
Materials fee, $3.50
Prereq.: S.S.A. 1 or its equivalen|
Pol. Sci. 44 Administrative Law
Mj . (Fij
Sociol. 34 Play and the Social Utiliq
Leisure Time
Mj (or M 1st T) (Burgess) F]
Materials fee, $3.50
Prereq.: 27 Mjs including Sociol. 1
S.S.A. 6 Immigration
M 1st T (Abbott]
Prereq.: 27 Mjs
S.S.A. 15 Administration of Social
M 2d T (Bruno) .
Prereq.: S.S.A. 1
Pol. Econ. 45 Types of Economic Or!
tion M 1st T (Douglas) <
Prereq.: Pol. Econ. 1 or 27 Mjs .
i Pol. Econ. 62 The Problems of Fed^
M 1st T (Douglas) T
Prereq.: 36 Mjs
THE COLLEGE OF EDUCATION
SUMMER QUARTER, 1924
\
EDUCATION
8 A Class Organization, Management, and Testing in High Schools (2)
Prereq.: Education 1 or 2
8B Class Organization, Management, and Testing in High Schools (2)
Prereq.: Education 1 or 2
25 School Surveys (3)
Limited to candidates for the Master's degree
33 School Buildings and Equipment (3) DM 1st T 2 hours
36 A High-School Administration (3)
36 B High-School Administration (3)
_ _ 46 A Curriculum (3)
fly 46B Curriculum (3)
59 A Occupational Information, Guidance, and Placement (3)
! 59 B Occupational Information, Guidance, and Placement (3)
70 Psychopathic, Retarded, and Mentally Defective Children (3)
DM 1st T 2 hours
71A Introductory Laboratory Course in Experimental Education (3)
M 1st T 2 hours
71B Introductory Laboratory Course in Experimental Education (3) 2 hours
83 A Investigations in Grammar and Composition (3)
172 Statistical Methods: Advanced Course (4)
Prereq.: 6 Mjs in Education, including a course in Statistics
M 2d T (Breed) HHB 262
M 1st T (Breed) HHB 262
Mi (Gray) Bl 284
HISTORY, CIVICS
AND OTHER
SOCIAL STUDIES
N
(McCornack) Bl 108
M 2d T (Smith) Bl 117
M 1st T (Smith) Bl 117
M 1st T (Bobbitt) HHB 159
M 2d T (Bobbitt) HHB 159
M 1st T (Filbey) HHB 342
M 2d T (Filbey) HHB 342
(Schmitt) HHB 143
(Freeman) Bl 406
M 2d T (Buswell) Bl 4061
M ist T (Lyman) Bl 205 j
Mj (Holzinger) Bl 404 i
33 See 8:00 70 See 8:00 71A See 8:00
4 A Methods of Teaching in High Schools (2)
4B Methods of Teaching in High Schools (2)
72 A Statistical Methods Applied to Educational Problems (3)
72B Statistical Methods Applied to Educational Problems (3)
71B See 8:00
M 1st T (Smith) Bl 117
M 2d T (Smith) Bl 117
M 1st T (Holzinger) Bl 404
M 2d T (Holzinger) Bl 404
8QA Investigations in Reading: Elementary Schools (3) M 1st T; repeated M 2d T (Gray) Bl 284
81A Investigations in Spelling (3) M 1st T (Breed) HHB 262
81B Investigations in Arithmetic (3) M 2d T (Breed) HHB 262
83A Investigations in Grammar and Composition (3) M 2d T (Lyman) Bl 205
86A Investigations of Problems in the Teaching of Geography (3) M 1st T (E. Parker) Bl 210
86B Investigations of Problems in the Teaching of Geography (3) M 2d T (E. Parker) Bl 210
131A Administrative and Supervisory Functions (4) M 1st T; repeated M 2d T (Bobbitt) HHB 159
Prereq.: 6 Mjs in Education and practical administrative experience
6A Introduction to the Psychology of High-School Subjects (2)
M 1st T; repeated M 2d T (Ryan) Bl 107
Prereq.: 1 Mi in Psychology
34A The Administrative Management of Pupils (3) M 1st T (Stetson) HHB 262
51A Organization and Administra* on of Normal Schools (3) M 2d T (Butcher) 108
56B General Principles of Fine ant Industrial Art (3) M 2d T (Taft) Bl 404
62B The Supervision of Industrial Education (3) M 1st T (Wright) HHB 342
69 A The Psychology and Treatme) t of Exceptional Children (3) M 1st T (Buswell) Bl 284
j 76A Mental Tests M 1st T; repeated ^ 2d T (Freeman) HHB 159
82 Investigations of Problems in r.he Teaching of History and Other Social Studies (3)
Mj (or M either T) (Tryon) Bl 205
88A General Methods of Teaching in High Schools: Advanced Course (3) M 2d T (Parker) Bl 117
88B Types of Teaching in High S hools: Advanced Course (3) M 1st T (Parker) Bl 117
HOME ECONOMICS
POOD AND NUTRITION AKD TEXTILES AND CLOTHING
M 1st T (Halliday) Bl 384, 305
Lab. fee, $3
Lab. fee, 5
aughlin) Bl
Lab. fee, $3
"Fist T (Roberts) Bl 388, 390
INSTITUTION
ECONOMICS
5 A Experimental Cooking (2)
Limited to 18 2 hours
Prereq.: Home Economics 1. General Chemistry
5B Experimental Cooking (2) M 2d T (Halliday) BI388, 3U5
Limited to 18 2 hours
Prereq.: Home Economics 1, General Chemistry ....
38A Nutrition (3) M 1st T (McLaughlin) B1305, 310
Lect.: Tu, Th 9:00; Lab.: M, W, F 8:00-10:00
Prereq.: Home Economics 36 and Physiology
39 A Survey of Dietaries (3) Mis. - , .
2 hours Prereq.: Home Economics 38A u aT\ m SSI 100
39B Survey of Dietaries (3) M 2d T (Roberts) Bl 384, 390
2 hours Prereq.: Home Economics 39A R1 Q07
102A Advanced Garment Construction (2) M 1st T (Gaut)
Limited to 20 Prereq.: Home Economics 135 i m inf'ir\ Rl AQO 135A Costume Design (2) Sec. a M 1st T (Clark) Bl 492
Limited to 24 Prereq.: 1 Mj in Art and Home Economics 100 or 101 mTni flA Rl 3Q7
135B Costume Design (2) M 2d T (Claris) Bl 397
Limited to 24 Prereq.: 1 Mj in Art and Home Economics 100 or 101 +N Rl
141A Interior Decoration I: Household Design (2) Sec. a M 1st T Eilert) Bl 4J6
Limited to 20 Prereq.: 1 Mj in Art „ ,al Rl <MU
154A Buying of Textiles and Clothing (3) M 1st T (Stevenson) Bl 3U4
Prereq.: Home Economic. 100 or 101. 152. end Political Economy Mat. tee, »1
of Textiles and Clothing (3) M 2d T (Stevenson) Bl 304
Home Economics 100 or 101, 152, and Political Economy Mat, tee, $1
•See 8:00
M 2d T (Trilling) Bl 304
M 1st T (Trilling) Bl 304
70 A Institution Cooking
(2) M 1st T
(McKenney, Sawin)
Lect.: F 9:00; Lx 8
Lab.: Tu,W, Th 8:00-
10:00 Limited to 12
Prereq.: Home Economics
3 or 5
70 B Institution Cooking
|2) M 2d T
(McKenney, Sawin)
Lect.: F 9:00; Lx 8
Lab.: Tu,W, Th 8:00-
10:00 Limited to-12-
Prereq.: Home Eco- ..
154B Buying c
Prereq.: 1
r 3A General Methods of Teach'- ; in Elementary Schools (2)
Types of Teaching in Elen ntary Schools (2)
[26A Duties of City School Superintendents (3)
I 37 A The Study and Supervise n of the High-School Girl (3)
I 38A The Junior High School (3)
| 33 B The Junior High Set i (3)
| 51B Supervision and Approvement of Instruction in Normal Schools (3)
I 61A The Administration of Vocational Education (3)
I 63 A Mental apd'Physical Growth of Children (3)
Prereq.: 1 Mj in Psychology and 3 Mjs in Education
| 63B Mental and Physical Growth of Children (3)
* Prereq.: 1 Mj in Psychology and 3 Mjs in Education m Psyciioi >gy of Learning (3) M 2d T (Freeman) HHB 262
Prereq.: 3 or more Mjs in Education or Psychology
|85A Investigations of Problems in the Teaching of Science (3) .
• j M 1st T; repeated M 2d T (Downing) Bl 30o
Jk
M 2d T (Parker) Bl 117
M 1st T (Parker) Bl 117
M 1st T (Stetson) HHB 262
M 1st T Sec. a (Smithies) HHB 143
M 2d T (Ryan) Bl 284
M 1st T (Ryan) Bl 284
M 2d T (Butcher) Bl 108
M 1st T (Wright) HHB 342
M 1st T (Buswell) HHB 159
M 2d T (Buswell) HHB 159
14 Organizing High-
School History for
* Teaching Purposes (3)
\ Mj (Tryon) Bl 205
Prereq.: 3 MjB in History
5A, 5B, 38A, 39A, 39B, 102A, 135Ao, 135B, 141 Aa-
62 A Investigations in Home Economics Education (3)
Prereq.: Home Economics 60 or 1
63 A Administration and Supervision of Home Economics (3)
Prereq.: Home Economics 60 or 160
9A Nutrition in Public Schools (3) M 1st T; repeated M 2d T (Roberts) Bl 304
Prereq.: for Home Economics students. Home Economics 8 or 39; for teachers or social wor ers,
i Education or Sociology.
36 Chemistry of Food (3) Mj (or M either T)
(1st T, Blunt, McLaughlin; 2d T, Halliday) Bl 305, 310
Lab. fee, $6
M 1st T (Glark) Bl 397
Mat. fee, $1
Sec. 6 M 1st T (Eilert) Bl 493
Mat. fee, $1
M 2d T (Clark) Bl 493
Mat. fee, $1
M 1st T (Stevenson) Bl 125
Lab. fee, S3
M 2d T (Stevenson) Bl 125
Lab. fee, S3
2A Introduction to the Scientific Study of Education (2) M 1st T; repeated M 2d T (Clarson) Bl 284
4A Methodspf Teaching in High Schools (2) M 2d T (Allen) Bl 108
4B Methods of Teaching in High Schools (2) M 1st T (Allen) Bl 108
7A Class Organization, Management, and Testing in Elementary Schools (2) M 2d T (Snarr) Bl 214
Prereq.: Education 1 or 2 \ m on
7B Glass Organization, Management, and Testing in Elementary Schools (2) M 1st T (Snarr) Bl 214
Prereq.: Education 1 or 2 _ _ , , ,,,r»
| 20A Constitutional and Legal Basis of Public-School Administration (3) M 1st T (Edwards) HHB 262
| 20B Constitutional and Legal Basis of Public-School Administration (3) M 2d T (Edwards) HHB 262
137A The Study and Supervision of the High-School Girl (3) M 1st T Sec. b (Smithies) HHB 143
5A Introduction to the Psychology of Elementary-School Subjects (2) M 2d T (McClusky) HHB 143
115A Methods of Historical Research (3) ' M 1st T (Edwards) HHB 262
115B Methods of Historical Research (3) M 2d T (Edwards) HHB 262
I 34A The Administrative Management of Pupils (3) M 2d T (Hartwell) Bl 117
I 35 A The Teaching Staff (3) M 1st T; repeated M 2d T (Allen) B 108
| 35B The Teaching Staff (3) M 1st T (Bevendge) Bl 117; repeated M 2d T (Barr) Bl 404
153A Visual Education (3) m M 1st T (McClusky) Bl 404
I 64A Psychology of Elementary Education (3) M 1st T; repeated M 2d T (Judd) HHB 159
Prereq.: 1 Mj in Psychology and 3 Mjs in Education . _ /_l, ^ _OJ | 72 A Statistical Methods Applied to Educational Problems (3) M 2d T (Clarson) B 284
stical Methods Applied to Educational Problems (3) M 1st T (Clarson) Bl 284
177B not Use of Tests in Improving High-School Instruction (3)
M 1st T; repeated M 2d T (Breslich) Bl 214
Lect.: W, F 11:00; Lab.: M, T, Th 10:00-12:00
Prereq.: Organic Chemistry
136 A Advanced Costume Design (3)
Limited to 24 2 hours
Prereq.: 2 Mjs in Art and Home Economics 135
141A Interior Decoration I: Household Design (2)
Limited to 20 2 hours
Prereq.: 1 Mj in Art
141B Interior Decoration I: Household Design (2)
Limited to 20 2 hours
Prereq.: 1 Mj in Art
152A Textiles (2)
Limited to 20 2 hours
Prereq.: General Chemistry
152B Textiles (2)
Limited to 20 2 hours
Prereq.: General Chemistry .
160A Methods of Teaching Textiles and Clothing (2) M 1st T (Trilling) Bl oJ0
Prereq.: 2 Mjs in Education and 3 Mjs in Textiles and Clothing
160B Methods of Teaching Textiles and Clothing (2) M 2d T (Trilling, Bl 390
Prereq.: 2 Mjs in Education and 3 Mja in Textiles and Clothing j
36, 136 A, 141 Ab, 141B, 152 A, 152B—See 10:00
43A Nutrition Classes with Children (3) M 1st T (Chaney) Bl 388
Lect.: W, Th 11:00; Lab.: Tu, F 11:00-12:00 and 12:30-1:30 Lab. fee, $3
Prereq. or parallel: Home Economics 9A and 39A
87 A Institution Organization
and Administration
(3) M 1st T
(Goodrich, Pope) Lx 8
Lect.:Tu, W,F 8:00;
Lab.: Th 8:00-10:00
Prereq.: „ Home Economics
86
87 B Institution Organization
and Administration
(3) M 2d T
(Goodrich, Pope) L.x 8
Lect.: Tu,W,F 8:00;
Lab.: Th 8:00-10:00
Prereq.: Home Economics
87A
88 A Institution Equipment
(3) M 1st T
(Colburn and
Assistants) Lx 8
Lect.: W, Th, F 9:00;
Lab.: 8:00-10:00
Prereq.: Home I>»enomics
86
8°^.-institution Equipment
(3) M 2d T
(Colburn and
Assistants) Lx 8
Lect.: W,Th,F 9:00;
Lab.: Tu 8:00—10:0')
Prereq.: Home Eco^
nomics 88A
9:00
70 A See 8:00
70 B See 8:00
87A See 8:00
87B See 8:00
88A See 8:00
I Sqe 8:00
30A.Jj>he Organization of
' Community Life and
the New Civics for
Teaching Purposes in
"Upper Grades and
High Schools (3)
M 1st T (Hill) Bl 205
PrerAq.: 3 Mjs in Social
Scienctf other than History
30B The Technique of
Teaching Community
Life and The New
Civics (3)
M 2d T (Hill) Bl 205
Prereq.: 3 Mjs in Social
Science., other than History
12A The Technique of
High-School History
Teaching (3)
M 1st T (Hill) Bl 205
Pre.oq.: 3 Mjs in History
12B The Technique of
High-School History
Teaching (3)
M 2d T (Hill) Bl 205
Prerjq.: 3 Mjs in History
M 1st T (Sharp) Bl 404
M 1st T ( ) Bl 108
M 2d T ( ) Bl 108
Mist T (Reavis) HHB 262
M 2d T (Reavis) HHB 262
8A See 1:30 43A See 11:00 .
64 A Organization and Supervision of Vocational Home Economics bp ^ ^ ^ cf:0on) 304
Prereq.: Home Economics 60 or 160
65 A Home Training of Children (3)
Prereq. 27 Mjs
101A Principles of Garment Construction (1)
Limited to 20 - 2 hours
101B Principles of Garment Construction (1)
Limited to 24 2 hours
120B Millinery (2)
Limited to 24 2 hours
Prereq.: Home Economics 120A
M 2d T (Binzel) Bl 304
M 1st T (Gaut) Bl 3p7
Mat. fee, $1
M 2d T (Stephenson) Bl 397
Mat. fee, $1
M 1st T (Stephenson) Bl 492
Mat, fee, SI
(3)
10:00
82A Marketing
M 1st T
(McAuley) Lx 8
Lect.: M,Tu,W 10:00;
Lab.: Th 10:00-12:00;
Field work Saturday
morning
Prereq.: General Chemistry,
Political Economy 0
82 B Marketing (3)
M 2d T (McAuley) Lx8
Lect.: M,Tu,W 10:00;
Lab.: Th 10:00-12:00;
Field work Saturday
morning
Prereq.: General Chemistry,
Political Economy 0
11:00
82A See 10:00
82B See 10:00
9 A School Hygiene (2)
116 A History of American Education (3)
116B History of American Education (3)
I 38A The Junior High School (3)
| 38 B The Junior High School (3)
I 40 A The Administration and Supervision of Elementary Schools (3)
M 1st T (Beveridge) Bl 117; repeated M 2d T (Hartwell) Bl 117
65 A Psychology of Secondary Education (3) M 1st T; repeated M 2d T (Judd) HHB_159
Prereq.: 1 Mj in Psychology and 3 Mjs in Education
71A Introductory Laboratory Course in Experimental Education (3)
M 2d T 2 hours _ (McClusky) Bl 406
71B Introductory Laboratory Course in Experimental Education (3)
M 1st T 2 hours (McClusky) Bl 406
77 A The Use of Tests in Improving Instruction (3) , ,, „, m ™
M 1st T (Beauchamp) Bl 284; repeated M 2d T (Barr) Bl 404
121A Financial Administration (4) M 1st T (Morrison) Bl 107
71A See 2:30
71B See 2:30
110 A History of Modern Elementary Education (2)
• 10B History of Modern Secondary Education (2) j 21A Financial Administration (3)
r:36A High-School Administration (3)
36 B High-School Administration (3)
. 57 A Industrial Education (3)
157 B Industrial Education (3)
| 57 A The Investigation of Study Habits (3)
11! A ' 'tii national Research (3)
11B The Technique of
History Teaching in
Ltpper Grades and
Junior High Schools
M 1st T; repeated
M 2d T (Vannest)
Bl 205
673 See 2:30 101A See 12:30 101B See 12:30 120B See 12:30
8 A Introduction to Nutrition and Dietaries (2) (Lehman) Bl 304, 388
M 1st T; repeated M 2d T Lab. fee, $1.50
Lect.: Tu, W, Th, F 1:30; Lab.: M 12:30-2:30
37A Chemistry of Food (3) M 1st T (Halliday) Bl 305, 310
Lect.: M, Th 1:30; Lab.: Tu, W, F 1:30-3:30 Lab. fee, 33
Prereq.: Home Economies 36 .
68 A Social and Economic Relationships of the Home (3) M 1st T (Hemer )B1 390
Prereq.: 2 Mjs in Home Economics and Political Economy .
68B Social and Economic Relationships of the Home (3) M 2d T (Hemer) Bl 3JO
Prereq.: 2 Mjs in Home Economics and Political Economy
135A Costume Design (2) Sec. b M 1st T (Eilert) Bl 493
• Limited to 20 2 hours Mat. tee,- $1
Prereq.: 1 Mj.in Art and Home Economics 100 or 101
153A Advanced Textiles (3) M lst tT [SufppleIBI 125
2 hours Lab. fee, $3
Prereq.: General Chemistry and 2 Mjs in Home Economics including Home Economics 152, or at least
4 Mjs in Chemistry
M 1st T (Burton) Bl 108
M 2d T (Burton) Bl 108
M lst T (Morrison) Bl 107
M lst T (Reavis) HHB 262
M 2d T (Reavis) HHB 262
M lst T (Woellner) HHB 342
M 2d T (Woellner) HHB "
M lst T; repeated M 2d T (Beauch
M 1st "
11A Ow nizing Upper-_
and Junior
Tiool History
jing Purposes
M lst T
37 A See 1:30 136A5 See 1:30
60 A Methods of Teaching Food and Household Management (2>
153A Bee 1:30
M lst T (Lehman) Bl 304
Prereq.: 2 Mjs in Education and 3 Mjs in Food and Nutrition
60B Methods of Teaching Food and Household Management (2) D, ...
M 2d T (Lehman) Bl 304
Prereq.: 2 Mjs in Education and 3 Mjs in Pood and Nutrition . . • •
67 A Household Organization: Buying of Equipment (3) M lst T (Hemer) Bl 390
Prereq.: General Chemi-s t• ry, P— olitical E—c onomy- , "2 *M*j-s Home Economics
67B Household Organization: Time Resources (3)
Lect.: Tu, W, Th, F 2:30; Lab.: M 1:30-3:30
Prereq.: General Chemistry, Political Economy,
120 A Millinery (2)
Limited to 24 2
Prereq.: Home Ec<
120B Millinery (2)
Limited to 24
Prereq.: Hoij
M 2d T (Heiner) Bl 384, 3^g
Lab. fee,
Mjs in HomeEconomics
2:30
86 A Institution
Organization and
Administration (3)
M lst T
(Goodrich, Pope)
Lx 8
Lect.: Tu, W, Th
2:30;
Lab.: F 2:30-4:30
Prereq.: Political Economy
0 aad 2 Mjs in
Institution^ Economics
83 B Institution
Organization and
Administration (3)
M 2d T Lx8
(Goodrich, Pope)
Lect.: Tu, W, Th
2:30;
Lab.: F 2:30-4:30
Prereq.: Home Economies
86'A
3:30
86 A See 2:30
86B See 2:30
ition
OA See 2:30
Nutrition (3)
L^-30
Prereq.: Home J
Nutrition (3)
3 or 16 hours al
11:50-12:20 CHAPEL. Attendance is expected
32 Jewish Literature
of the New Testament
Period
Mj (or M either T)
(Votaw) H 15
72 Jesus' Way of
Life
M 1st T
(Bowen) H 16
R34 The Personality
and Work of
Christ
M 1st T
(Cross) H 31
IV112 Naturalism and
Religion
M 2d T
(Hutcheon) H 16
30 Principles of Religious
Education
Mj (or M either T)
(1st T, Soares;
2d T, Ward)
H 26
Soc. 11 The Family
Mj (or M 1st T)
HM E 10
Materials fee, $3.50
COMPARATIVE
RELIGION
7 Outline History of
Religions
M 1st T
(Haydon) CI 18
P.T. 81 Inter-racial
Contacts
Mj (or M either T)
(Baker) CI 15
27 General Oratory
M 1st T
( ) H 17
62 The Epistle to the
Philippians
M 1st T
(Bowen) H15
37 Education and 24 Types of Religous
Worship Philosophy
M 1st T M 1st T
(Soares) H 26 (Haydon) CI 18
35 Week Day Religious
Instruction
M 2d T
(Evans) H 26
THE DIVINITY SCHOOL
(Including Courses in the Chicago Theological Seminary)
SUMMER QUARTER, 1924
PRACTICAL
THEOLOGY SOCIOLOGY
33 Constructive
Homiletics
Mj (or M either T)
(1st T, Davis;
2d T.Ray) H 26
2 Christianity and
Roman Imperialism
Mj (or M either T)
(1st T, Riddle;
2d T, Case)
H 17
Prescribed
S16 The Use of the
Bible in Preaching
M 1st T
(Davis) H 15
T22 The Rural
Church
M 2d T
(Ray) H 15
Soc. 57 Rural Sociology
Mj (or M either T)
(Bedford) C 13 A
Materials fee, $3.50
S2 The Literature of
the New Testament
Mj (or M either T)
(Robinson) H 16
Prescribed
56 The Gospel of
John
Mj (or M either T)
(Scott) H 15
1A Introduction to
Systematic
Theology
M 1st T
(Mathews) H 17
7 A Christian Ethics
M 2d T
(Smith) H 17
11 The Church in
Medieval Europe
Mj (or M either T)
(McNeill) H 26
50 Psychology of
Religious
Development
Mj (or M either T)
(Evans) C 9 D
67 The Epistle to the
Hebrews
Mj (or M either T)
(Scott) H 15
39 Christian Doctrine
of the
Atonement
M 1st T
(Mathews) H 26
51A Christian
Theology and
Modern Science
M 2d T
(Smith) H 26
22 Protestantism
in Europe since
the Reformation
Mj (or M either T)
(McNeill) H 16
33 Organization of
Religious
Education
Mj (or M either T)
(1st T, Evans;
2d T, Ward) H 17
P.T. 70 Introduction
to the Missionary
Enterprise
Mj (or M either T)
(Baker) CI 15
PUBLIC SPEAKING
26 Vocal Expression
for the Minister
M 1st T
( ) H 17
48 Mohammedan
Religion
Mj (or M either T)
(Sprengling) H 33
154 Elementary
Assyrian
Mj (or M either T)
(Luckenbill) H 21
284 The Monotheistic
Revolution in
Egypt
Mj (Allen) H 28
188 Research in
Assyrian
Mj (or M either T)
(Luckenbill) H 23
(Hours to be
arranged)
OLD TESTAMENT NEW TESTAMENT
70 Hebrew Language 5 A The Jesus of the
Mj (Price) H 15
Prescribed M 2d T
(Case) H 17
57 A The Acts of the
Apostles
M 1st T
(Riddle) H 17
SYSTEMATIC
THEOLOGY CHURCH HISTORY
21 History and
Prophecy
Mj (Willett) H 26
Prescribed
\ Advanced Hebrew
Etymology
M 2d T
(Price) H 24
81 Advanced Hebrew
Syntax
M 1st T
(Price) H 24
9 A Early Christianity
and Roman
Imperialism
M 1st T
(Identical with
Ch. H. 2)
(Riddle) H 17
11A Christianity and
Roman Culture
M 2d T
(Identical with
Ch. H. 2)
(Case) H 17
SI 3 The Life and
Message of Paul
Mj (or M either T)
(Robinson) H 16
91 Selections from
Jeremiah
M 2d T
(Meek) H 31
97 The Book of Amos
M 1st T
(Meek) H 31
27 Origin and Development
of Hebrew
Religion
Mj (or M either T)
(Meek) H 31
76 Intermediate
Hebrew
Mj (or M either T)
(Willett) H 21
200 Elementary
Arabic I
Mj
(Sprengling) H 33
41 The Greek of the
New Testament
Mj (or M either T)
(Votaw) H 15
R1B Doctrine of God
M 1st T
(Cross) H 26
M36 Problem of Personality
and Its
Values
M 2d T
(Hutcheon) H 26
D25 The Renaissance
and the Church
Mj (or M either T)
(Garrison) H 16
MISSIONS
MUSIC
DISCIPLES'
DIVINITY
D1 History of the Disciples
M 2d T
(Garrison)
D3 History and Principles
of Christian
Union M 1st T
(Garrison)
' f
3 A Survey of
Oriental History
Mj (or M either T)
(Luckenbill) H 23
50 Saracenic Architecture
and Arts
M 2d T
(Sprengling) H 33
58 The Elements of
General Phonetics
M 1st T
(Sprengling) H 33
PRACTICAL WORK
1 Ear-Training and
Sight-Reading
Tu, Th (Stevens)
2 Church Music and
Singing
W, F (Stevens)
3 Harmony and
NCounterpoint
* ^Stevens)
Hours to be arranged -
THE LAW SCHOOL
Registration Office, Third Floor, Law Building
SUMMER QUARTER, 1924
FIRST YEAR SECOND AND THIRD YEARS FIRST YEAR SECOND AND THIRD YEARS
Mj (Parks) (N) 51 Private Corporations
liMjs (I
Th (see 10:00)
67 Administrative Law (Freund)
Mj 1st T TO)
M, Tu, W, Th
2d T (N)
M, Tn, W, Th, F (to August 21)
3A Personal Property (Bordwell)
M 1st T TO)
M, W, Th, F
4 Agency (Sears)
DM 2d T TO)
M, Tu, W, Th, F (see 11:00)
60 A Remedies M 1st T (Bordwell)
ru (see 11:00) (N)
30 Suretyship (Sehil
DM 2d T
M, Tu, W, Th, F (see 11:00)
63 Constitutional Law I (Hal
DM 1st T (j
M, Tu, W, Th, F (see 11:00)
14 Rights in Land (Rundell)
DM 2d T (S
M, Tu, W, Th, F (to 3:45 daily)
(see 11:00)
16 Future Interests (Madden)
DM 1st T rS)
M, Tu, W, Th, F (to 3:45 daily)
(see 11:00)
51 Private Corporations (Parks)
liMjs TO)
M, Tu, W, Th, F (see 8:00)
14 Rights in Land (Rundell)
DM 2d T (S
Tu, Th (see 2:30)
16 Future Interests (Freund)
DM 1st T (S)
Tu, Th (see 2:30)
30 Suretyship (Schiff)
DM 2d T (S
M, W, F (see 9:00)
63 Constitutional Law I (Hall)
DM 1st T (S)
M, W, F (see 9:00)
80A Remedies
M 1st T
(Bordwell)
(N)
course™ COntinUinS thl0USh b0th TennS °f the Quarter may be taken f0r theFirst Term 0Dly' but ™W bo taken until the student later completes the
All law lectures are given in the lecture-rooms of the Law Building-North, South, Court Rooms (N, S, Ct), as indicated above
Students not registered in the Law School should not register for law courses without consulting the Dean of the Law School.
THE UNIVERSITY OP CHICAGO
The School of Education
Department of English Course 16 A
THE TEACHING OP READING IN INTERMEDIATE GRADES
' A.Laura McGregor
•I-The Scientific Investigation of the Reading Problem.
a) The psychology of reading.
1- Eye movements,
•2- Extent of perception during the reading pause.
3- Inner speech.
4- Interpretation and the nature of meaning,
b) The hygiene of reading,
c) Classroom tests and measurements.
1- Rate and quality of oral reading.
2- Rate and comprehension in silent reading.
d) Controlled experiments and their significance.
II-The Reading Problem in the Intermediate Grades.
"* "v" _ *• 1 ... •,
a) The pre-adoiescent pupil,
b) Aims, methods, and attainments in reading in primary grades;
c) Changing aims and methods of intermediate grades,
a) Relative.importance of silent and oral reading.
e) Achievement levels.
111 -Methods-, of Teaching Reading in. Intermediate Grades ,
a) Oral reading,
1- Motivation.
2- Preparation.
3- The establishment- of standards.
b) Silent reading.
1- Rate.
(a) Grade standards.
(b) Factors involved in speed of reading.
(c) Methods of increasing rate.
2- Comprehension.
(a) Factors influencing comprehension.
(b) Methods of securing adequate comprehension.
c) Auxiliary lessons.
. 1- Vocabulary bxiilding.
2- The use of the dictionary,
3- The "Hew to Study" lesson.
4- Informal testing.
t
d) Remedial work in reading.
GUIDING PRINCIPLES
Rhythmical eye movements and fixations should be establish^
motor habits.
Increased perception span means fewer fixations per line anc
consequently more rapid reading.
Training in effective silent reading can only be accompli shit
directly — not through training in oral reading.
Some system of word analysis must be taught to children in ordl
that they may help themselves over confusion points in reading.
Greater progress is made by an individual when he recognizeUj
definitely the character of the desired improvement, and when Ik
able to measure his achievement.
.•Silent reading should supersede oral reading in a rapidly
increasing degree In the intermediate grades.
Reading in the intermediate grades should Include organized'
training to increase speed and insure greater comprehension in silc
reading.
Remedial measures must be applied in intermediate terades to
overcome special reading defects. The poor reader will not make suf*
ficient progress under general training alone.
- 1
The subject matter of reading must be vivid and concrete if
words are.to have meaninc.
y
The'intermediate pupil should have acquired a stock of interV
pertatiomnss and should use these for the ccoommoprreehheennssiinonn of unfamiliar
ideas, which are complexes built up of familiar ideas.
Periods of reading should be followed by periods of relaxation
or far work.
Reading poiitions must be carefully observed.
Ihe teacher must assume responsibility for securing proper
lighting and seating conditions in the schoolroom.'
Only text-books of the highest-possible mechanical perfection
should be selected.
Analytical work with words must not be begun too early or the
Uae ox tne speech mechanism, which should be automatic, becomes com
scious. 1
SCHOOLROOM PRACTICE
Much reading of easy material of an interesting and varied nature.
An increasingly larger amount of time devoted to silent reading.
Phonic analysis in primary grades; word study and word analysis
in intermediate grades.
The use of standardized and informal tests for individual diagnosis
and for the objective measurement of achievement.
Silent reading
a- Training for speed.
1- Practice under time pressure.
2- Decrease of vocalization.
3- Increase of perception span,
b- Training for comprehension
1- Reading to a problem-
2~ Selecting central thought.
3- Organizing ideas after reading,
4- Giving personal judgments.
Oral reading.
Motivated in the audience situation.
Grouping for remedial work.
Group I^Those who" read slowly but comprehendingly{speed)
Group II-Those who read rapidly but carelessly!analysis)
Group III-Those who read slowly and with little comprehension
(training of both kinds).
Group IV-Those who read rapidly and comprehendingly
(interesting silent reading,undirected)
Use of large reading units-- extensive reading to gather concrete
details about a central idea.
Reading between the li.nes--making personal applications
Play and handwork periods included within the school day.
Daily regulation of window-shades and artificial light.
Seat adjustment.
Instruction in the correct reading position.
Phonics not over-emphasized and delayed until child himself begins
to notice differences in word sounds.
Individual observation and clinical care.
THE SO IKiVi i.c J-O ^
I-LABORATORY EXPERXMENTo
a. Eye-movements and fixations
b- Perception span
c- Eye-voice span
' XI-TESTS AND MEASUREMENTS
a_ oral reading ability
1- Rate
S- Ability to pronounce words at sight
b- Silent reading
1- Hate
2- Comprehension
III- PSYCHOLOGICAL THEORY
The nature of meaning
IV- HYGIENE OF READING
a- Fatigue
b- Eye defects
c- Speech defects
CONCLUSIONS
Eye movements are not steadily Continuous in reading but consist
of a series of movements and fixation points.
Rate in reading is determined by the number and duration of the
fixations,
The number and average length'of the fixations are greater in
oral reading than in silent reading.
Individual studies of eye movements show regressive movements
at confusion points.
It is possible to test scientifically the reading ability of a
child in any grade and to compare his achievements with objective
standards.
Silent reading rate surpasses oral reading rate about the fourth
grade.
'High rate and good quality in silent reading are commonly related.
Ther e is great variation in reading ability among pupils of the
same grade.
There is an underlying feeling of meaning in itself in the reading
of any sentence.
The interpretation of a word or phrase depends upon the presence
of associated experience in the mind of the reader. There is little emphasis'
upon the picture in the mind and great emphasis upon personal
reaction.
Eye strain is closely related to nerve strain.
Myopia, the chief eye defect, is likely to be progressive In
youth and is incurable.
The amount of stuttering among children seems to be augmented
at the time when reading instruction . is begun.
READING ACTIVITY'S
CHER'S ACTIVITIES
t Reading Lessons
For speed
For comprehension
For appreciation
For testing progress
bral Reading Lessons
j
For presentation of
thought to audience
• For improvement in
mechanics
For testing progress
Study Lessons
(with reading units)
Recognition of problem
Collection of data
Organization of ideas
Discussion of conclusions
Auxiliary Lessons
For vocabulary building
• For effective use of
text-books
For effective use of
dictionary
For stimulation of
home reading
Remedial Lessons
HE CHILD'S ACTIVITIES
OBJECTIVES IN
READING
I-Permanent inter'
ests in reading
II-Economical and
effective study
habits
III-Thorough mastery
of the
mechanics of
the reading
process
Readings in School.
TSTlent and oral)
For general information
For study purposes
For pleasure
For improvement in the
process of reading
Reading at Home
(Silent)
For general information
For pleasure
For the treatment of
individual difficulties
Il-The Materials of Reading (Extensive Reading).
a) Informational reading in school.
The planning and use of reading units,
1- History,
2- Geography,
3- Civics.
4- Science
b) Appreciative reading in school
Literature.
c) General reading at home.
The direction and stimulation of general reading,
V-The Relation of Reading to Study (Intensive Reading).
a) The nature of study.
b) Intensive reading as a study process.
1- The recognition of specific problems,
2- Collection of data through reading.
3- Organization of ideas.
4- Re-reading.
5- Summarizing.
6- Application of ideas.
c) The textbook and its use.
Gov rse 16-A Bibliography on Reading,
/Briggs and Coffman
Burgess
Buswell
Buswell
Charters
IFreeman
Gray,C.T,
Gray, C.T.
Gray, W.S.
Germane & Germane
Huey
<|Jenkins
Judd
Judd cc Buswell
Klapper
Kendall & Mirick
Monroe
0 * Brien
Parker
Schmidt
Smith
Starch
Stone
Wheat
Yearbooks
y
Reading in the Public Schools
The Measurement of Silent Reading
An Experimental Study of the Eye-Voice Span
in Reading
Fundamental Reading Habits
Teaching the Common Branches
The Psychology of the common Branches
Types of Reading Ability as Exhibited through
Tests and Laboratory Experiments
Deficiencies in Reading Ability
Studies of Elementary School Reading through
Standardized Tests.
Silent Reading
The Psychology and Pedagogy of'Reading
Reading in the Primary Grades
Reading:Its Nature and Development
Silent Reading:A Study of the Various Types
Teaching Children to Read
How to Teach the Fundamental Subjects
Measuring the Results of Teaching
Silent Reading
Types of Elementary Teaching, and Learning
An Experimental Study in the Psychology of Reading
The Reading Process
Educational Psychology
Silent and Oral Reading
TheTeaching of Reading
Sixteenth, Part I
Eighteenth, Part II
j Twentieth, Part II ' A
-J M- /» T Bibliography on study
> Dewey
P>Earhart
Hall-Quest
Jones
iMcMurry
Strayer and
Norsworthy
Starch
Judd
Zornow
Brown
Gray
Rhodes
' X
How We Think
Teaching Children to Study
Supervised Study
Teaching Children to Study
How to Study
How to Teach
Educational Psychology
Magazine References
Psychological Characteristics of Intermediate
Grade pupils,Sch.Rev.Mono.3,Feb.,1913.
Reading in the Fourth Grade, Jour.of tne N.Y.S.
Teachers' Ass'n. Jan.,1921.
Formulation of Method in Reading,
jour. Ed. Research. June,1920.
Importance of Intelligent Sileht Reading.
Elem. Sch. Jour. Jan.,1924.
Technique of Teaching Silent Reading.
Elem. Sch. Jour. Dec.,1922.
July 24, 1958
....Y...lL4A<: .dkR )
MUrfei M. Parks beput'jiegistrar! '
A—Excellent
B—Good
C—Fair
D—Passing
E—Condition
1,-—Failure
W—Withdrew
So.rieg, jiv.
m
in
to Las
t of any
attempt
Michael
of 1709 N.
a 17-year-old
'arrested during
which oc-
Way on Sept.
by police
Clark, the infirst
claimed to be
the burglary, shot
and seriously inclaiming
Diekemper
i.
fficers discovered
Lwere known to
peering the
_his Pico
JL
DEDICATION — Honoree Mrs. Mabel Hoggard, husband
David, and Principal Bob Gaston pose proudly with a portrait
presented to the school in formal dedication
ceremonies recently of Mabel Hoggard Elementary, "vie
school, formerly B- tanza Elementary, is now named for the
first black educator hired by the Clark County School
District.
Building
corporated
ty
during
mits for
The
sharp
meets
Reidj
Sen
strial Commission
Hit $82 Millio
^2 Las Vegas Review-Journal - Tuesday, October 1,
1974
« —
Bo?ST.s7XTyew'!trh'aM„a„b:' H,°egar4 h»s')i"><, «avid, and Prlnc^
dication ceremonies recently of Ma^el EToeejf yf 'yi^ scho°l in formal deformerly
Bonanza Elementary is now nfmlSl2 ®lementary- The school,
by the Clark County School District. 6 * educator hired
MABEL HOGGARD MADE HER MARK IN HISTORY
Mabel Hoggard was born Mabel Welch on March 10, 1905, to
Mr. & Mrs. Marshall Welch in Pueblo, Colorado.
After elementary and high school in Iowa, she enrolled in the
University of Tennessee at Nashville, then known as Tennessee A & M,
where she completed the Normal Course for Teacher Training. Upon
graduation, she received the highest position offered the graduates--
a teaching principal ship in a two-room school in the coal fields of
Jenkins, Kentucky for $100 per month. While there, she married
Irving Wims and had one son, Charles I . Wims.
Three years later, the then Mrs. Wims and family moved to Williamson,
West Virginia. During this period she received her baccalaureate in
education doing graduate work in Chicago University, University of Utah,
and University of Nevada, Las Vegas.
This was the era of segregated schools and lily-white primaries.
When Mrs. Wims appeared to register to vote, a person was heard to say
he sure hoped they wouldn't take any more "niggers" in the Democratic
Party. She overheard him and promptly became a life-long Republican.
It was during these days that Mrs. Wims was told by a school janitor to
"contribute to the Democratic Party or lose your job." At that time,
Mrs. Wims and Mr. & Mrs. Onward Abington were colleagues in the Mingo
County, West Virginia school system. They lost their teaching positions
for not adhering to the janitor's ultimatum.
The other forty black teachers contributed and kept their jobs.
Mrs. Wims (Hoggard) was instrumental in the Abingtons moving to Las
Vegas and their being employed by the school district. Both of them
retired. Mr. Abington died in 1975; Mrs. Abington lives in North Las
Vegas.
After losing her teaching position, Mrs. Wims became the first
black regular writer for the Williamson News and became the first black
administrative staff person for the Williamson Housing Authority.
Subsequently, she worked in the State Republican Party of West Virginia
and for national committee men and multi-millionaire R. J. Funhauser
as governess.
In 1944, Mrs. Wims applied for a position with the Los Angeles
Housing Authority and was enroute to that position, when she stopped in
Las Vegas to visit her only aunt, Mrs. Mae Harris. The aunt and her
husband A. j. Harris and a cousin, Florence Elmore, persuaded her not
to go to Los Angeles, but to apply for employment in Las Vegas. In early
1945, she started working as secretary at the Jefferson Ave. U.S.O, where
she remained until in September 1945, as the first black teacher in the
state of Nevada.
This milestone in history came about the same time as Jackie Robinson
broke the color barrier in professional baseball. Just as all black
baseball players since that historic breakthrough owe some allegiance
to Mr. Robinson, so all black educators in Nevada have a deep feeling of
gratitude to Mrs. Wims for completing her probationary requirement which
ultimately opened the doors for others.
In 1947, the same year that she received her first unconditional
contract to teach in the Las Vegas School District, Mrs. Wims married
J. David Hoggard, Sr., a widower with two sons.
During her twenty-five years with the District, Mabel Hoggard
taught at Westside, Matt Kelly, Highland and C.V.T. Gilbert schools.
ggard wao one of the teachers to testify in court supporting an
integration plan for the school district. Eva Simmons, now an administrator
for the district, was the other one. They were supported by
Bermce Moten (Jenkins), then a member of the School Board of Trustees.
Along with other members of the community and teaching profession,
Mabel Hoggard was highly instrumental in having a lunch program established
in the elementary schools.
In 1975, the Board of Trustees saw f i t to honor this pioneer educator
by changing the name of the former Bonanza Elementary School to the Mabel
Hoggard School.
The number of awards of which Mabel Hoggard has been the recipient
attests to the esteem in which she is held by her peers, former students
and the community at large. The capstone of these recognitions was her
being chosen in 1977 by the University of Nevada, Las Vegas, as one of the
state's Outstanding Citizens. She received this great honor along with
former Mayor Oran Gragson and publisher of the Las Vegas Sun, Hank Greenspun.
After her retirement in 1970, Mabel Hoggard had been a volunteer for
many church, civic and educational endeavors. One of these which she dearly
loved was working with children and parents, trying to teach them the value
of thrift by joining the Westside Federal Credit Union. Her suffering a
stroke in 1979 has forced a curtailment of these activities.
In addition to all members of her family and particularly her nine
grandchildren, this great teacher and humanitarian lighted a path for
all Nevadans to walk in and are "proud that they did."
In addition to her other experiences, Mabel Hoggard has been a
Program Director for the Operation Independence Day Care Center and a
- 3 -
First Grade Teacher at the Trinity Methodist Church Day Camp School.
Her Civic and Professional Activities have included membership on the
Executive Committee of the Las Vegas Community Concert Association and
on the Executive Committee of the Southern Nevada Teachers of English
and Foreign Languages. She has served as Secretary of the Clark County
Chapter of the American Red Cross, Treasurer of the Las Vegas Classroom
Teachers Association, Secretary of Program Material for the Women's
Society of Christian Service, Zion Methodist Church and has served on
the Executive Board of the Las Vegas Branch of the NAACP. She has been
a delegate to the Nevada State Educational Convention and a delegate to
the National Educational Convention. Mabel Hoggard is a member of Gamma
Phi Delta Sorority, a member of the Republican Central Committee of
Las Vegas, a life member of the National Education Association, a member
of the League of Women Voters, a member of the United Church Women and
a member of the National Retired Teachers Association.
She has been cited as Honor Teacher of the Week by the Las Vegas
Rotary Club and received the Distinguished Service Award in the Field
of Education from the Clark County Teachers Association.
###
Reprinted from the Las Vegas Sentinel, February 18, 1982
Clark County schools, and
the people behind their names
AS a primary teacher, Mabel Hoggard taught at
Westside Elementary, > Matt Kelly, Highland
and C.V.T. Gilbert schools la Las Vegas from
1946 through 1970. During that period, in 1953,
Bonanza Village Elementary School was completed.
Two decades later, on July 11,1974; Thurman White,
now Associate Superintendent of School Facilities,
presented Exhibit F to the Clark County School
Board requesting that Bonanza be renamed Mabel
W. Hoggard Elementary as a special tribute to honor
that special lady.
• .• •
Born in Pueblo, Colo., Mabel Hoggard attended
elementary and high school in Des Moines and
Colfax, Iowa. She received her Bachelor of Science
in Elementary Education, Cum Laude, from Bluefield
State Teachers College, Bluefield, West Virginia,
and completed post graduate work at the University
of Chicago and the UCLA. For six years Mrs.
Hoggard was a teaching principal at Elementary
School No. 4 in Jenkins, Kentucky. Another six years,
again as a teaching principal, were spent at
Delbarton School, Mingo County, West Virginia. For
two years Mrs. Hoggard was a member of the
administrative staff of the Public Housing Authority
of Williamson, West Virginia, with a second two-year
stint on the administrative staff of the Jefferson Ave.
USO in Las Vegas.
1962 found Mrs. Hoggard honored by Las Vegas
Rotary as the "Honor Teacher of the Week." As
Chairman of the Westside Council in 1969 Mrs.
Hoggard worked with a coalition of the six Westside
elementary schools and was Instrumental in influencing
Clark County School District Trustees in establishing
a district-wide lunch program in these
schools, growing from the success of a pilot nutritional
breakfast program previously established
there.
During her summers, Mrs. Hoggard served as
Program Director of the Operation Independence
Day Care Center, was first grade teacher for Trinity
Methodist Day Camp, and found time to pursue
further postgraduate work at Nevada Southern University
(now UNLV). But studying, teaching and
raising her family didn't take all of this energetic
educator's time. She was also a member of the
executive committee of the Las Vegas Community
Concert Association, on the executive committee of
the Southern Nevada Teachers of English and Foreign
Languages, secretary of the Clark County
Chapter of the American Red Cross for two terms,
treasurer of the Las Vegas Classroom Teachers
Association (two terms), and served on the executive
board of the NAACP. She attended both the Nevada
State Educational Convention in Ely and the National
Educational Convention at Portland, Oregon.
Mrs. Hoggard is a life member of the National
Education Association, a member of the League of
Women Voters, NAACP, Zion Methodist Church and
the American Association of Retired Teachers. In
April of 1968 she received the Distinguished Service'
Award from the Clark County Teachers' Association
at its annual banquet, where she was described as
one of the first primary teachers in the County,
dedicating her time to children, their education and -
her community. At Commencement Exercises at
UNLV in 1977, Mabel Hoggard was honored with a
Distinguished Nevadan Award, presented by UNLV
President Donald Baepler. In addition to these many
civic endeavors, Mrs. Hoggard has been a regular
donor to the SUN Summer Camp Fund.
She and husband, J. David Hoggard (former
Executive Director of the Economic Opportunity
Board of Clark County) have raised three sons in Las ;
Vegas. .• , • ; ,
z
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o
d uo
5
UNLV Commencement, 1977: Mabel Hoggard
ceives Distinguished Nevadan Award from uni
sity's President Donald Baepler
Mabel Hoggard School became the center i
community discussion in March of 1982 when
School District changed its status from element
school to Sixth Grade Center.
At a Board of Trustees meeting March 24, I
Thurman White, who had made the original req
that the former Bonanza Village Elementary Sc
be renamed Mabel Hoggard, stated the chang
Sixth Grade Center was essential to avoid o
crowding.
Assemblyman Marian Bennett, a minister re
senting this West Las Vegas District, voiced I
thoughts of many parents in attendance who wis
the school remain an elementary. Parents suggei
Hoggard could become a year-round school, but
Clark County School District's recommendation j
accepted by the School Board of Trustees and Mi
Hoggard Elementary became the eighth Sixth Gr
enter in Clark County, joining Kermit R. Booker,
Kit Carson, C.V.T. Gilbert, Matt Kelly, Jo Macl
Quannah McCall and Madison Schools. With
ruling, Rhonda Jackson, student council presit
and sixth grader, and her classmates became
last regular elementary school students to att
Mabel Hoggard.
m. i
Principal Shirley Barber
Sunday. May 29. 19
iii** . 'jfc
Students have left their mark on the community,
adding to the prestige of the Mabel Hoggard School.
Stephanie Meacham placed second in the Earth
exhibits for the Sixth Grade Centers represented at
the 1983 Clark County School District Science Fair.
In; 1982,* second graders from Mabel Hoggard
Elementary posed for silhouettes displayed on the
walls of McCgrran International Airport.
Among 1982 "winners in the Clark County School
District Art Show was Hoggard kindergartener
William Levi. Robert Gaston, onetime principal of
Mabel Hoggard Elementary, teamed with two other
Cal-Western Law students to win the Western Regional
Championship in the National Trial Competition,
a competition among law students of law
schools accredited by the American Bar Association.
Sixteen teams participated.
Mabel Hoggard, beloved as a teacher and community
leader, has left an enduring mark on Las
Vegas.
• • • PRINCIPAL of Hoggard Sixth Grade Center is
Shirley Barber .She and her husband, Air Force
Major Howard Barber, moved to Las Vegas
with their four children to be close to Barber's
parents, Wyatt and LueAnnie Barber.
Feeling that the children would benefit from the
stability and security of their grandparents, with
Major Barber overseas, Mrs. Barber brought Bruce
(now a senior at Western High), Lorie (college
freshman), Bryant (Stanford law student) and Karen
(student at Gibson Junior High) to Las Vegas. Major
Barber, now retired, presently teaches at Von Tobel
Junior High School. Mrs. Barber first taught at Lois
Craig School.
From Dayton, Ohio where Shirley attended
Wright State University, receiving her Master's
Degree, the Barber family traveled extensively.
Both Bryan and Karen were born in Europe. Major
Barber served in Vietnam in the '50s. Lorie and
| Bryant are both graduates of Western High School.
I Five awards were recently given to the Mabel
Hoggard Sixth Grade Center. The Nevada PTA,
during its Las Vegas convention, awarded it a plaque
for Outstanding Achievement in enlisting over 75
percent participation in Hoggard's PTSA (students
are included here). The second honor, The Bonanza
Award, came for gaining a 25 percent membership
over the same period last year. Award number three,
also from the Nevada PTA Association, is in appreciation
for an outstanding contribution made to
advance the cause of excellence in education for the
youth of Nevada. The Nevada PTA gave Hoggard
Sixth Grade Center its fourth award, called the
'49'er, and the Educator's Award, for 90 percent
teacher membership in its PTA is the fifth award
proudly accepted by Janet Coombs, PTSA President,
and Principal Barber for the entire school.
The 500 students come to school via nine buses
from feeder schools (Howard Wasden, Ruth Fyfe,
J.T. McWilliams and Paul Culley) and the Hoggard
PTSA represents parents from each of these feeder
schools. Mrs. Barber feels the Sixth Grade Center is
successful beyond her wildest dreams, with good
working arrangements, lots of communication, benefited
by planned input from principals of the feeder
schools.
Shirley Barber is a working principal. She is
visible on the playground, in classrooms, at community
and school meetings. She feels that extracurricular
activities are an important part of the total
development of a child. At the Hoggard Open House
this year there were more than 300 parents in
attendance for the evening meeting. The Christmas
program played to standing room only, and the same
is expected at the Spring Concert May 26. The
Student Council gave a Valentine dance; the schol
carnival, PTSA supported, was a great success; a
yearbook, "Hoggard Highlights" was named in a
contest run by the students themselves, and the
Hoggard Roadrunners field a Drill Team, a Flag
Team and put out their own newspaper.
The firebrand behind all this is one Shirley
Barber, whose motto seems to be "You can't get
things done sitting behind a deskf'D
LAS VEGAS SUN Magazine 5B

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Case Ho, 30844
D«pt No, 2
IN THE EIGHTH JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT OP THE STATE
OP NEVADA, IN AND FOR fflS COUNTY OP CLARK
MABEL W. WIMS,
-V8-
IRVIN E, WBJS,
Plaintiff,
defendant.
ENDORSED
FILED
/I: aT#H.
J U N 2 9 1 9 4 6
GERTRUDE MASSENGALE, Clerk
By THERESA LEAYITT
DECREE OF DITORCE
The above entitled action having ©os© on regularly for trial before
the above entitled court, sitting without a Jury, this day of June,
1946, upon the Complaint of the plaintiff and the Appearanoe and if&iver
of 1fte defendant, and upon all the records and files herein, the
plaintiff appearing personally and through her attorney, C« NORMAN CORNWALL,
ESQUIRE, and the defendant having entered a written appearanoe, waiving
service of Summons, and time provided for by law to answer, and notice of
time and place of trial, notice of decision and bindings of •Eaot and Conclusions
of Law, which appearance is on file in the above entitled action,
the plaintiff introducing evidence in support of the allegations of Her
Complaint, and the uourt being fully advised in the premises and finding
that the plaintiff is now and for more than six week® prior to the commencement
of this action and ever since has been an actual, bona fide
resident and domiciliary of the County of Clark, State of Nevada, actually
and physically residing and being domiciled therein during all of said
period of time and that this Gourt has jurisdiction over both of the parties
-1-
C. NORMAN CORNWALL
ATTORNEY AT LAW
LAS VEGAS, NEVADA
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hereto and of this oauee of action, and that eaoh and erery of the
allegations contained in plaintiff's Complaint were and are true
and that plaintiff is entitled to the relief prayed for in said
Complaint.
HOW, 3HEREF0KB, by reason of the law in sudht cases made and
provided, and the Court deeming this a proper case therefor, on
motion of C. Roman Cornwall, Attorney, for Plaintiff,
IT IS ORDERED, ADJUDGED AND DECRIED -that the bonds of matrimony
existing between the plaintiff, MABEL W. WB5S, and the defendant.
Hi YIN E, WBJS, be, and the sane are hereby wholly dissolved and a
decree of absolute divorce is hereby granted plaintiff, and each of
the parties hereto is hereby restored to the status of a single
person.
DATED ASD DOSE IN °pen Court this^Jfjuif of June, 1946
A, S. HENDERSON
District Ju<ige. ~*
-2-
Cprltftrattoit nf Copy
STATE OF NEVADA]
COUNTY OF CLARK J SS"
GERTRUDE MASSENGALE appointed
I, LLOYD SLKAYNE, the duly elected, and acting Clerk of Clark County, in the State of
Nevada, and Ex-Officio Clerk of the District Court, do hereby certify that the foregoing is a true,
full and correct copy of the original:..DEGEER..OE..DJVORCE,..-in..±.ha..«c±-i.om-©Bt-it-ledU.aad
.CaseJ^o...30g4.4 JUe nt...« o..... 2
MABEL 1VIMS., .)
plaintiff....
)
J
-vs-
)
J
IRVIR E. VTEMS,
)
)
Befendant. i
now on file and of record in this office.
IN WITNESS WHEREOF, I have hereunto set my hand and
affixed the seal of theCourt at my office, Las Vegas, Nevada,
the e<... / day of
, A. D. 1&6
GERTRUDE MASSENGALE
Clerk,
Deputy Clerk.
METRO Obituaries
Letters
Jeff German
Street Talk
Friday, June 2, 1989 Las Vegas SUN
Casino district bill to be recommended
By Michael L. Campbell
SUN Staff Writer
CARSON CITY - An Assembly
subcommittee will recommend
passage of a bill that is
supposed to prevent future
growth of casinos into Las Vegas
neighborhoods, Assemblyman
Gene Porter said Thursday.
Porter, a Las Vegas Democrat,
is chairman of a three-member
Assembly Judiciary subcommittee
that is supposed to clean up
the language of the bill authored
by Assemblyman Matthew
Callister, D-Las Vegas.
The bill would mandate that
local governments within Clark
MABEL HOGGARD
Nevada
pioneer
teacher dies
By Bob Shemeligian
SUN Staff Writer
Mabel Hoggard, the state's
first black school teacher when
she was hired in 1946 in Las Vegas,
died Wednesday night after a long
illness. She was 84.
A diminutive woman known
among family members and
friends as a sensitive, caring
person, Mrs. Hoggard was born
March 10, 1905, to Marshall and
Maybelle Welch in Pueblo, Colo.
As a teenager, she worked during
the summertime for her
parents at the family grocery
store in Pueblo. The remainder of
the year, she lived with her
grandparents in Iowa and went to
elementary and high school in Des
Moines and Colfax, Iowa.
She told everyone she planned
to become a teacher.
In an interview 12 years ago,
Mrs. Hoggard said, "I don't know
of anything more important than
molding that young person, than
teaching. Without a foundation,
you can't build."
Her husband of 42 years, J.
David Hoggard, former executive
director of the Clark County
Economic Opportunity Board,
said his wife was very proud to be
recognized in the history books as
Nevada's first black school
teacher.
"She liked to help and to
educate people," he said. "You ask
about her hobbies and what she
liked to do. It always involved
people. She was dedicated to civic
work, and she was an active life
member in the NAACP. She was
always trying to help."
Mrs. Hoggard volunteered in a
See HOGGARD, Page 2B
County establish gaming districts
and once these districts are set up,
no casino could be placed outside
of them.
Assembly Judiciary Chairman
Bob Sader, D-Reno, was worried
about the constitutionality of
AB845 and wanted to have the
bill's wording reviewed by the
subcommittee and the
Legislature's research division
before a vote was taken by the full
committee.
The subcommittee has recommended
a few changes to the bill
which are intended to make sure
the wording isn't arbitrary and in
turn unconstitutional as Sader
feared.
Sader said a vote will be taken
in the Assembly Judiciary Committee
as soon as Porter is ready
to present the amended version.
Because the b i l l was introduced
late in the legislative
session, there was some concern
expressed by proponents of it
about its chances for passage.
Callister has, however, received
a boost as both Democratic
Gov. Bob Miller and Southern
Nevada's larger casino resorts
have backed limiting the growth
of casinos into Las Vegas
neighborhoods.
Callister said Thursday the
suggested amendments to the bill
were acceptable and asserted
there was still enough time during
this session to pass the measure.
Callister indicated that some
lawmakers may face difficulty
voting against the bill, which
some legislative observers
believe is politically popular.
"It's going to be a tough one to
say no to and then go home to
explain to your constituents,"
Callister said.
While the city of Las Vegas has
been neutral on the bill, representatives
have said sections are too
vague and could add bureaucratic
layers to their zoning process.
Las Vegas Deputy City
Manager Randy Walker said
Thursday there are some
Pop stars deliver anti-drug message
loopholes in the bill and there was
no mechanism within the bill for
actually creating a gaming district.
"That's a loophole big enough
to drive a semi-truck through,"
Walker said.
Several attempts at placing
casinos in the Las Vegas Valley
have generated controversy recently.
After several hundred residents
protested a zoning change
with the city of Las Vegas that
would have allowed the Bighorn
Casino to be placed next to the
Deskin Elementary School and a
cemetery, the developer
withdrew his application.
POW-WOW
to conduct
$1.2 billion
in business
By Penny Levin
SUN Staff Writer
Executives from Las Vegas
hotels, sightseeing firms,
transportation companies and the
convention authority have
finalized plans for POW-WOW,
the world's premier international
travel marketplace.
About 4,000 persons are expected
to attend the prestigious
travel show, which begins Sunday
and runs through Wednesday.
About 170 journalists from 40
countries are already pre-registered
to cover the meeting.
During the four-day "one-stop
shopping mall," about $1.2 billion
worth of business will be conducted
on the floor of the show.
Companies that arrange for
tours and travelers from all over
the world to visit America can do
business with all the firms that
make travel to the United States
possible.
These include airlines, hotels.
2B LAS VmEGuAnSa SaUtnN rFrriiadaayy,, Jjuuunce 24), 1I9"8"9" Philanthropist Audrey
Meyer Mars dies
City gets financial boost
for jail expansion bond effort
Audrey Mars, the wife of the
retired head of Mars Inc., Forrest
Edward Mars of Las Vegas, and a
life-long proponent of numerous
humanitarian, cultural and environmental
activities, died
Thursday of complications from
cancer in Washington, D.C.
Besides her husband, she is survived
by three children: Forrest
E. Mars Jr. and John F. Mars,
both of Virginia, and Jacqueline
Mars Vogel of New Jersey.
She also is survived by 10
.grandchildren and two great-
grandchildren.
Throughout her life, Mrs. Mars
ievoted her time and energies to
jibe family business as well as to
Extensive volunteerism.
She assisted individuals, governments,
private industry, notfor-
profit institutions, and the environment
with program planning
and leadership. As one of this
country's leading lay experts on
cancer, she was active in promoting
awareness and research and
treatment programs relating to
£ cancer.
Audrey Meyer Mars was born
in Chicago on May 25, 1910. She
received her baccalaureate
degree from Rosary College in
Illinois. She married Forrest
& Mars in 1930.
Her interest in volunteer work
began with her service as a volunteer
medical social worker. Later
she worked with the American
Cancer Society, eventually
becoming president of the
: Virginia Division, and chairman
Hippos, whales kin
The land animal most akin to
whales is probably the hippopotamus,
recent research in
molecular biology indicates.
(CNS)
of the board.
Mrs. Mars established cancer
societies in Indonesia, Taiwan and
Thailand, provided practical advice
to other international
societies and chaired seminars on
volunteer cancer control in
Russia and the Philippines. Her
tireless efforts were rewarded
with honors including the Thai
Cancer Society Award, the Philippine
Cancer Society Award and a
citation from the Institute of
Hematology in Warsaw.
Mrs. Mars' outstanding contributions
to society took many
forms. She served as president of
the National Trustees of the National
Symphony Orchestra, as a
fellow of the Virginia Museum
and of the Aspen Institute, as a
governor of the Arthritis and
Rheumatism Foundation, and on
committees of the International
Union Against Cancer. As an inter
nationaitrust.ee of the Wildlife
Fund, she made numerous visits
to the Galapagos, Nepal, Bhutan,
Botwana and the Amazon to help
protect endangered species.
She has been a member of the
national Board of the Medical
College of Pennsylvania and received
an honorary doctorate of
humane letters from the institution
in 1985. In 1988, her contribution
to the medical college
launched a $16 million endowment
campaign and underwrote
one of the most generously funded
endowed professorships in the
country, the Audrey Meyer Mars
Professorship in Geriatric Research.
She also received honorary
degrees from Georgetown University
Medical Center and
Niagara University and a diploma
from the "2000 Women of
Achievement" in London.
The city of las Vegas has received
a major financial boost in
its efforts to obtain voter approval
of a jail expansion bond,
Mayor Ron Lurie announced
Thursday.
Greg Nelson, president of
Minami Development, has
donated $5,000 to the Committee
for Jail Expansion, which is
coordinating advertising promoting
the bond issue. The city is
prohibited from using taxpayer's
dollars to advertise election issues.
In making the donation,
Minami Develpment joins 30 business
and concerned citizens who
believe that expanding the city's
jail facilities will be effective in
keeping criminals off the streets
of Las Vegas.
"As an investor in the
downtown area, we want to help
ensure that is is safe for those
individuals who work and relax
here," Nelson said. "This donation
is our way of showing or concenr
and support for this critical bond
issue which will continue to assist
Sheriff Moran and the judges in
winning the fight against crime in
this city."
Voters will be asked June 6 to
approve a $9.5 million bond issue
for the expansion of the city's jail
that will include an additional 450
beds, a kitchen and counseling
center at the Stewart/Mohave Detention
facility.
OBITUARIES
WAYNE ROBERT ABBEY
Wayne Robert Abbey, 58, ot Las
Vegas, died Tuesday in Las Vegas. He
was born Sept. 22. 1930, in Harrison
Valley. Pa. He was a retired truck rental
agent and an Army veteran.
He is survived by his wife, Jean; two
sons. Wayne Abbey, of Middletown, R.I.,
and Michael Abbey, of Carmel Valley,
Calif.; three daughters, Deborah Torres,
of Salinas, Calif.. Linda Wasserman, of
Miami, and Dianna Waller, of Las Vegas;
his parents. Lawrence and Isabel Abbey.
p.m. and Saturday from 9 a.m.-1 p.m. in
Palm Valley View Mortuary. Services will
be at 1 p.m. Saturday in Palm Valley View
Chapel Burial will be in Palm Valley View
Cemetery.
ORLANDO DEOWDRAY DUNN
Orlando Deowdray Dunn, 24, of Las
Vegas, died Sunday in Las Vegas. He was
born Aug. 3,1964, in Louisiana. A lifetime
resident, he was a weIder with an iron
company.
He is survived by one daughter,
' 1ffteha ' I I 1" it—
Hoggard—
Continued from Page 1B
number of organizations and
founded several programs to help
people — especially minorites.
In a pragmatic approach to
help residents of West Las Vegas,
Mrs. Hoggard in 1975 founded
Project Savings at West Side
Federal Credit Union. She did this
to help children learn the value of
a savings account.
Among her achievements, she
has been named a Distinguished
Nevadan by UNLV, and a local
school has been named after her.
More than 550 students attend The
Mabel Hoggard Sixth Grade
Center at 950 N. Tonopah Drive.
She was named woman of the
year by several local clubs, and
was honored by the American Red
Cross, NAACP, Zion Methodist
Church, Wesleyan Service Guild
and the Clark County Classroom
Teachers' Association.
After graduating with a cum
laude degree in education from
Bluefield State Teachers College
in West Virginia, Mrs. Hoggard
quickly was hired as a teaching
principal in a two-room school
house in Jenkins, Ky. She later
worked in the same capacity in
West Virginia.
It was during her tenure in
West Virginia that Mrs. Hoggard
truly learned the price of standing
up for rights.
At the time, she said, the Democrats
in the West Virginia
county were coming into office,
and they demanded that school
trustees take money from
teachers' salaries and put it into
party coffers.
"There were 32 black teachers,
and we joined hands and said, 'We
won't do it,"' Mrs. Hoggard said in
a 1977 interview. "Well, when it
got down to it, only four of us did
not and we were fired."
She came to Las Vegas in the
1940s for a visit, and decided to
stay. She quickly got a job in her
field, and her Aug. 16, 1946, contract
for $2,090, to teach second
grade at Westside Elementary
School is a milestone document.
"I try to do what I believe is
right," Mrs. Hoggard once said. "I
know sometimes you have to
fight, but everywhere you go you
find some people with the right
attitude."
Besides her husband, Mrs. Hoggard
is survived by two sons,
Charles I. Wims of Oakland, Calif.,
from a previous marriage, and J.
David Hoggard Jr. of Las Vegas.
She also is survived by eight
grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren.
Funeral arrangements are
pending.
"MANYA FORMERJUNE
BRIDEIS
NOWON A'WARMER'...
VEGAS DIVORCE 'RIDE'!!!"
(Alter..."falter")
DON'? know if this new June
will be snore in tune with those
L.V. headin' for a weiWin' «r
those c
Howevi
continu
years r
...somehow proving those wl
ched" still keep moving here
The continued "do-it-youi
been a hit with the counties
who infiltrate our state...of i
hi cost of ..."leaving" (ft livin
(divorce) is one of the very ft
down in price & legal advice
to soar to whatever the co
would bear...& the 6 week
dency STILL holds true for tl
even short) last are wise (?)
forthcoming book, this monfl
aims & maintains "When ;
buried...BUT...When your si
(Right...fellow bachelors?)
Anyway, your way, this
WARM June...if U have a h?
ever, if your still Scckin' for k
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even "share" in mind...Alimo
STILL IS..."the HIGH cost of '
BOASTS, TOASTS & "
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Baliy's "Catch A Rising Star'
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Baliy's & as of last Sat. nite
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catching on name game cot
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"Cow Pie") back in the pastu
MAINLY complete family or
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MABEL HOGGARD
Nevada
pioneer
teacher dies
By Bob Shemeiigian
SUN Staff Writer
Mabel Hoggard, the state's
first black school teacher when
she was hired in 1946 in Las Vegas,
died Wednesday night after a long
illness. She was 84.
A diminutive woman known
among family members and
friends as a sensitive, caring
person, Mrs. Hoggard was born
March 10, 1905, to Marshall and
Maybelle Welch in Pueblo, Colo.
As a teenager, she worked during
the summertime for her
parents at the family grocery
store in Pueblo The remainder of
the year, she lived with her
grandparents in Iowa and went to
elementary and high school in Des
Moines and Colfax, Iowa.
She told everyone she planned
to become a teacher.
In an interview 12 years ago,
Mrs. Hoggard said, "I don't know
of anything more important than
molding that young person, than
teaching. Without a foundation,
you can't build."
Her husband of 42 years, J.
David Hoggard, former executive
director of the Clark County
Economic Opportunity Board,
said his wife was very proud to be
recognized in the history books as
Nevada's first black school
teacher.
"She liked to help and to
educate people," he said. "You ask
about her hobbies and what she
liked to do. It always involved
people. She was dedicated to civic
work, and she was an active life
member in the NAACP. She was
always trying to help."
Mrs. Hoggard volunteered in a
See HOGGARD, Page 2B
OBITUARIES
ROLAND LOURENCO
Roland Lourenco, 44, of Las Vegas,
died Saturday in a local hospital. He was
born Aug. 4, 1944, in Central Falls, R.I. A
30-year resident, he was fabricator at a
roof and Truss company.
He is survived by seven sisters, Helen
Costa-Mello, of Foster, R.I., Edna Eaton,
of Dighton, Kan,, Doris Page, Yvonne
Skally, Lucille Jack, Claire Barschdorf,
and Rose Lathan, all of Las Vegas; four
brothers, Joseph Lourenco, Raymond
Lourenco, Normand Lourenco, and
Armand Lourenco, all of Las Vegas; and
numerous neices and nephews.
Visitation will begin at noon Tuesday
in Palm Redrock Mortuary. Rosary will be
said Tuesday at 7 p.m. in Palm Redrock
Chapel. Mass will be said at 10 a.m.
Wednesday in St. Francis De Sales
Church. Burial will be in Palm Memorial
" Park.
DAN LEE KNIGHT
Dan Lee Knight, 41, of Sandy Valley,
died Saturday in Sandy Valley. He was
born Dec. 25, 1947, in Bakersfield, Calif.
A 5-year resident, he was a heavy equipment
operator.
He is survived by three sons. Ken
Knight, Michael Knight, and Christopher
Knight, all of Mandan, N.D.; his parents,
-Warren and Nancy Knight, of Sandy
Valley; two brothers, Steven Knight, of
San Francisco and Tom Knight, of Las
Vegas; and his grandmothers, Ethel Lancaster,
of Bakersfield and Ollie Pryor, of
Upland. Calif.
Services will be held Tuesday at 10
a.m. in the LDS Church, Sandy Valley
Ward. Burial will be in Sandy Valley
Cemetery.
VINCENT BADOLATO
Vincent Badolato, 14, of Las Vegas,
died Saturday in a local hospital. He was
' born Oct. 26, 1974, in Las Vegas. A
lifetime resident, he was a junior high
school student.
He is survived by his parents, Sharon
and Dennis Badolato, of Las Vegas; two
sisters, Stacy Badolato and Kristi
Badolato, both of Las Vegas; his
grandmother, Margaret Bennan, of Las
Vegas; grandparents, Edna and Frank
Holbert, of Las Vegas; and one aunt,
Eileen Padberg, of Laguna Niguel, Calif.
Memorial services will be at 3 p.m.
Wednesday in Green Valley Congregation
of Jehovah's Witnesses. Burial will
be private.
MABEL W.HOGGARD
Mabel W. Hoggard, 84, of Las Vegas,
died Wednesday in a local hospital. She
was born March 10, 1905, in Dixon, III. A
45-year resident, she was a retired
school teacher with the Clark County
School District.
She is survived by her husband,
David; two sons, Charles I. Wims, of
Oakland, Calif., and J. David Hoggard Jr.,
of Las Vegas; eight grandchildren; and
two great-grandchildren.
Visitation will be 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Wednesday
and Thursday in Palm Mortuary
Downtown. Services will be at 2 p.m.
Friday in Zion United Methodist Church.
Emtombment will be in Palm Memorial
Park.
CHARLES B. HENDERSON
Charles B. Henderson, 75, of Las
Vegas, died Thursday in Las Vegas. He
was born Sept. 8, 1913, in Vancouver,
Wash. A 41-year resident, he was an
electrical engineer at Nellis Air Force
Base, a veteran of the Merchant Marines,
a member of Oasis Masonic Lodge No.
41, Nellis Masonic Lodge No. 46 F & AM,
Scottish Rite Bodies of Las Vegas,
Zelazah Shrine Temple of Las Vegas, and
the Q.B.'s flying organization.
He is survived by one son, Charles B.
Henderson, of Seattle; four sisters,
Lenora E. Hughes, of Oregon City, Ore.,
Kathleen Torrance, of Gresham, Ore.,
Mary DePiero, of Sublimity, Ore., and
Elsie Thompson; and two grandchildren.
Visitation will be noon-9 p.m. Tuesday
and 9 a.m.-2 p.m. Wednesday in Palm
Mortuary Downtown. Services will be
Wednesday at 2 p.m. in Palm Chapel
Downtown. Burial will be private.
Nevada's first black teacher dies
1 By Marcia Austin
Review-Journal
Services are being planned for
Mabel Hoggard, Nevada's first
black school teacher, who died
Wednesday night in Las Vegas.
She was 84.
She was born on March 10,
1905, in Pueblo, Colo., where her
parents ran a grocery store.
During the summers, she
worked in the Colorado store,
where she informed one and all
that someday she was going to be
a teacher.
She attended a small college on
the fringes of the South — the
Bluefield State Teachers College
in Bluefield, W.Va. — and re-
VIJV/ OVI1UUX
district for two years but she feels
honored to have known Hoggard
even for that short period.
"For the last two years the kindergartners
have given her a birthday
party. She's also been to the
last two Grandparents Days. She
was in a wheelchair each time but Study
ceived her bachelor of science degree.
She did post graduate work
at the University of Southern
California and the University of
Nevada, Las Vegas.
In 1946 she became the first
black teacher hired in Nevada.
For the next 24 years she taught
first and second grades.
In 1962 she was honored by the
Las Vegas Rotary Club, which
cited her dedication to children
and her contributions to her profession
and her community. She
also received the Distinguished
Service Award from the Clark
County Teachers Association at
its annual banquet in 1968.
She was named woman of the
tuciu gui ueais. i ne sixtn-graaers
recognized her from the picture in
the general office and whenever
she visited they ran up to greet
her."
NAACP President Rev. Jesse
Scott said he met Hoggard when
he first moved to the city in 1970
and he has always considered her a
year by several clubs and was
honored by the American Red
Cross, NAACP, Zion Methodist
Church and Wesleyan Service
Guild at the Clark County Classroom
Teachers Association.
But, one of the most noticable
honors and probably the most
lasting memory of her is the Mabel
W. Hoggard Elementary
School. The sixth grade center is
located at 950 N. Tonopah Drive.
"Only when the horizons of all
children have been broadened —
when children are motivated to
move ahead, to secure the education
they must have in order to
fill positions of responsibility in
Please see HOGGARD/4B
MABEL HOGGARD
...dead at 84
u uigurng, ^
big impact on children, the community,
the church, the NAACP
and people everywhere she went."
Survivors include her husband,
David; sons, J. David Hoggard Jr.
of Las Vegas and Charles I. Wims
of Oakland, Calif.; eight grandchildren
and two great-grandchildren. H
I/Friday, June 2, 1989 b Hoggard-
From 1B
our society — then, and only then,
will we be able to make much needed
change possible without undue
painful conflict," Hoggard said in
1974 when she spoke to Clark
County School Trustees, who renamed
Bonanza Elementary
School in her honor.
Hoggard suffered from a series of
strokes but her community work
continued. She retired in 1970.
Martha Castaneva, office manager
at the sixth grade center, said
she has only worked in the school
district for two years but she feels
honored to have known Hoggard
even for that short period.
"For the last two years the kindergartners
have given her a birthday
party. She's also been to the
last two Grandparents Days. She
was in a wheelchair each time but Study——
Quotable
i She was the epitomy of a school teacher. 3
— NAACP President Rev. Jesse Scott
she had such a good time, " Castaneva
said.
"I could see she enjoyed them all
but she especially enjoyed laughing
at the cute things the little ones
did and wanted to make sure all of
them got treats. The sixth-graders
recognized her from the picture in
the general office and whenever
she visited they ran up to greet
her."
NAACP President Rev. Jesse
Scott said he met Hoggard when
he first moved to the city in 1970
and he has always considered her a
close and dear friend.
"You don't have enough time or
space for me to talk about her," he
said Thursday. "She was the epitomy
of a school teacher. She was
lovely, articulate, kind and had an
outgoing personality. She made a
big impact on children, the community,
the church, the NAACP
and people everywhere she went."
Survivors include her husband,
David; sons, J. David Hoggard Jr.
of Las Vegas and Charles I. Wims
of Oakland, Calif.; eight grandchildren
and two great-grandchildren.
/1ABEL HOGGARD
Ldead at 84
4B/Las Vegas Review-Journal/Friday, June 2, 1989 c Hoggard-
From 1B
our society — then, and only then,
will we be able to make much needed
change possible without undue
painful conflict," Hoggard said in
1974 when she spoke to Clark
County School Trustees, who renamed
Bonanza Elementary
School in her honor.
Hoggard suffered from a series of
strokes but her community work
continued. She retired in 1970.
Martha Castaneva,- office manager
at the sixth grade center, said
she has only worked in the school
district for two years but she feels
honored to have known Hoggard
even for that short period.
"For the last two years the kindergartners
have given her a birthday
party. She's also been to the
last two Grandparents Days. She
was in a wheelchair each time but
Quotable
d She was the epitomy of a school teacher. 3
— NAACP President Rev. Jesse Scott
she had such a good time, " Castaneva
said.
"I could see she enjoyed them all
but she especially enjoyed laughing
at the cute things the little ones
did and wanted to make sure all of
them got treats. The sixth-graders
recognized her from the picture in
the general office and whenever
she visited they ran up to greet
her."
NAACP President Rev. Jesse
Scott said he met Hoggard when
he first moved to the city in 1970
and he has always considered her a
close and dear friend.
"You don't have enough time or
space for me to talk about her," he
said Thursday. "She was the epitomy
of a school teacher. She was
lovely, articulate, kind and had an
outgoing personality. She made a
big impact on children, the community,
the church, the NAACP
and people everywhere she went."
Survivors include her husband,
David; sons, J. David Hoggard Jr.
of Las Vegas and Charles I. Wims
of Oakland, Calif.; eight grandchildren
and two great-grandchildren.
FAITIILY HISTORY CENTER
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A MEMORIAL SERVICE
Celebrating the Life and Work of
Mabel Welch Wims
March 10, 1905 — May 31, 1989
Zion United Methodist Church
2108 Revere Street
North Las Vegas, Nevada
Dr. Marion D. Bennett# Pastor
June 9, 1989 — 2 p.m.
BIOGRAPHICAL SKETCH
Mabel Welch Wims Hoggard was born March 10,1905 to Marshall and Maybelle Welch in
Pueblo, Colorado. Her parents and an only sibling, Milton B. Welch preceeded her in death.
She united with Zion under Rev. Robert Kelly where she was a member until her death.
She was a member of the Women's Society of Christian Service and Church Women United.
She was also a zealous worker in the ecumerical movement in Las Vegas.
Mabel was known and loved as a caring person who knew early in life she wanted to be a
teacher. By perserverence and hard work, she obtained her education and fulfilled her life's
ambition by teaching for three years in Kentucky, six years in West Virginia and twenty-five
years in Las Vegas, Nevada.
Throughout her life, she was a gracious lady who enjoyed people of all ages regardless
of race, religion or cultural background.
Of her many accomplishments, Mabel was extremely proud of the role she played in
motivating the Clark County School District to establish lunch programs in elementary
schools, forming the WESTSIDE Council for the six schools in the area, which provided
school time for teachers and administrators to meet and discuss new ideas for old
problems in education, utilizing much volunteer help from the community organizing
"Project Savings'' within the Westside Federal Credit Union geared to teaching young
people how to save and manage their money.
During the late forties through the early sixties, the Hoggard house was a home away
from home for many black business people, government employees and civil rights
officials. This of course was prior to passage of the civil rights act and the public
accommodation law.
Many local people along with NAACP and HVD officials recall the great meals Mabel
cooked and served at 711 Morgan, including those delicious homemade rolls. Some may
recall the day Josephine Baker, the famous actress, singer and dancer let it be known she
had a taste for soul food. Mabel, with the help of friends prepared ham hocks, collard
greens, black-eyed peas and deep dish peach cobbler for Miss Baker and some of the
members of the cast. A memorable day and meal, and as always, Mabel received much
satisfaction when she could be the gracious hostess and knew you enjoyed the food.
Though Mabel received many accolades and recognitions during her life, she remained
humble and unassuming through the last presentation. A Cum Laude student, a master
teacher, a civil rights activist, a community leader, a concerned and caring human being, a
loving, loyal and devoted wife, mother, grandmother, great-grandmother and friend to all
mankind has gone ahead to eternal rest. Mabel will be sorely missed by all whose lives were
touched by her.
Left suffering this loss, with others, are her husband J. David Hoggard, Sr. - sons
Charles I. Wims and J. David Hoggard, Jr.; eight grandchildren, Jacques, Brian, Tawn,
Charles and Marcellus Wims, all of California; and Morrin, Jason and Michael, two qreatgrandchildren,
Nicole & Mekia, all of Clark County, Nevada; and one first cousin, Dorothy
McCants, of San Pablo, California. Additional loving members of the family include, Viola
f, T6!1"6 Tay'or Hoggard, Dianne Lier Hoggard and Carolyn Mclntyre, plus
all of the in-laws of her extended family and many, many devoted friends from the
community at large.
Order of Service
Prelude juanj t a Williams
Mr. Henry Shed
Processional "Rejoice Ye Pure in Heart" (#233)
Invocation Marion D. Bennett
nymn "For All the Saints" (#537)
Scripture Readings
Old Testament Ecclesiastes 3:1-9
Rev. Aaron T. Hoggard, Pastor
Alleyne Chapel A.M.E. Zion Church, Philadelphia, PA
EP'stle Timothy 4:5-8
Rev. Jerome Blankenship, Senior Chaplain
Humana Hospital Sunrise, Las Vegas, NV
GosPe i St. John 5:24-29
Dr. Roger Stressman, Superintendent,
North District, Desert Southwest Conference,
United Methodist Church
Recorded Excerpts From the 1989 Spring Concert
by Mabel Hoggard Sixth Grade Center Chorus
Mrs. Pamella Owens, Director
Composite Tributes Mr. Walter Johnson
Former Superintendent, Las Vegas School District
Dr. Paul Meacham, President
Clark County Community College
Dr. James Kitchen
Represinting University of Nevada, Las Vegas
Selection "Tramping" Meister Singers
Mrs. Kathlyn Wilson, Director
Dr. Hershel Williams, Business Manager
Composite Tributes Mrs. Shirley Barber, Principal
Mabel Hoggard Sixth Grade Center
Ms. Claudette Enus, Labor Relations Manager
Reynolds Electrical Engineering Company
Congregational Singing Mr. Anthony Thomas
Choir Director, St. James R.C. Church
Meditation Dr. Marion D. Bennett
Solo "His Eye i s on the Sparrow" Mrs. Barbara Kirkland
Meditation Bishop J. Clinton Hoggard
Presiding Prelate Third Episcopal District A.M.E. Zion Church
Selection "My Tribute" Meister Singers
Benediction Father Benjamin Franzenelli
Pastor, Holy Family Catholic Church
Recessional :"What a Fellowship" Congregation
Postlude
The family will be pleased to greet you in the
dining room of the church following entombment at
Palm Mortuary, 1325 North Main Street.
PALL BEARERS
Mr. Earl Brunner Mr. H.P. Fitzgerald
Mr. Herbert Freeman Dr. R. Guild Gray
Mr. Henry J. Moore Mr. Robert Onken
Due to the need to exercise moderation, we
regret all offers to participate in this service of
celebration could not be utilized. Your Christian
acceptance of these actions is deeply appreciated.
An especially sincere thank you to the Zion
family for being so supportive. All acts of kindness
expressed during our hour of bereavement are
appreciated and we pray will be returned to you
many times over. Additionally, we thank members
and friends for your presence, visits, prayers,
cards, letters, telegrams, telephone calls, flowers,
food and other expressions of love and friendship.
The Family
•sif#
Pvfc*
1
1ImI
1m11 PmI
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11•I tgi
H
m
&a^g
United States
o f America
Congressional Record
PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE 1 01s t CONGRESS ETRST SRCCT/AXT
Senate
ACHIEVEMENTS OF MRS. MABEL
w. HOGGARD
• Mr. BRYAN. Mr. President, I rise
before you today to commemorate the
lifetime achievements of Mrs. Mabel
W. Hoggard, the first black educator
in the State of Nevada.
A 45-year resident of Las Vegas, Mrs.
Hoggard was employed by the Las
Vegas Union School District in 1946.
In 1969, she was the chairman of the
Westside Council, a coalition which
was instrumental in establishing a district
wide lunch program in the elementary
schools. Mabel Hoggard
taught in a number of elementary
schools until June 1970, when she retired.
Her career in educating Nevada's
students did not end, however, upon
Mrs. Hoggard's retirement from the
classroom. She remained a tireless
worker on behalf of the people of the
West Las Vegas area and for education.
Mabel Hoggard was a member of
many civic and professional organizations,
including the League of Women
Voters, the Zion Methodist Church,
and the Las Vegas branch of the
NAACP. She was a two-term secretary
of the Clark County Chapter of the
American Red Cross, the treasurer of
the Las Vegas Classroom Teachers Association
for 2 years, and a life
member of the National Education Association.
Mrs. Hoggard received the Distinguished
Service Award in the Field of
Education from the Clark County
Teachers Association in April 1968. In
1974, the Bonanza Elementary School
was renamed the Mabel W. Hoggard
School by the board of school trustees
as a special tribute in honor of her
many years of service and dedication
to the schools of Clark County and to
the community.
In addition to being known as one of
the finest primary teachers in the
county dedicated to children, Mabel
Hoggard also raised three sons, and
was married to J. David Hoggard,
former executive director of the Clark
County Economic Opportunity Board.
Mable W. Hoggard's achievements in
the field of education, her dedication
to children, her service to the School
District, and her contributions to her
profession and her community have
been outstanding. This extraordinary
woman has served her State and country
with distinction, and her presence
will certainly be missed in Nevada.®
H
If
United States
of America
Vol. 135
Congressional Uecord st
PROCEEDINGS AND DEBATES OF THE J Qf CONGRESS, FIRST SESSION
WASHINGTON, THURSDAY, JUNE 15, 1989 No. 80
House of Representatives
TRIBUTE TO MRS. MABEL
HOGGARD
HON. JAMES H. BILBRAY
OF NEVADA
IN THE HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES
Thursday, June 15, 1989
Mr. BILBRAY. Mr. Speaker, I rise before my
colleagues today with deep sadness. An outstanding
member of the Las Vegas community
and an inspiration to all Americans, Mrs.
Mabel Hoggard, passed away on Wednesday,
May 31, 1989, after a long illness. Mrs. Hoggard
was 84 years old.
Mabel Hoggard was a remarkable woman,
who will be remembered as Nevada's first
black school teacher.
Born on March 10, 1905, to Marshall and
Maybelle Welch in Pueblo, CO, Mrs. Hoggard
worked during the summers for her parents in
the family grocery store in Pueblo. The remainder
of the year, she lived with her grandparents
in Iowa and went to elementary and
high school in Des Moines and Colfax, IA.
While growing up, she informed one and all
that someday she was going to be a teacher.
She graduated with a cum laude degree in
education from the Bluefield State Teachers
College in Bluefield, WV. Her first job was as
a teaching principal in a two-room school
house in Jenkins, KY. She did postgraduate
work at the University of Southern California
and the University of Nevada, Las Vegas.
When she came to Las Vegas in the 1940's
for a visit, she decided to stay. In 1946 she
became the first black teacher hired in
Nevada. For the next 24 years she taught first
and second grades.
Mrs. Hoggard's energy and commitment to
helping and educating people was shown in
her dedication to civic work. She volunteered
in a number of organizations and founded
several programs to help people—especially
minorities. In 1975 Mrs. Hoggard founded
Project Savings at West Side Federal Credit
Union. She did this to help children learn the
value of savings accounts.
For her distinguished and selfless contributions,
Mrs. Hoggard received many commendations
and awards. Among her achievements
she was recognized as a Distinguished Nevadan
by UNLV. She was named woman of
the year by several clubs and was honored by
the American Red Cross, NAACP, Las Vegas
Rotary Club, Zion Methodist Church and Wesleyan
Service Guild, and the Clark County
Classroom Teachers' Association. But, one of
the most noticeable honors and probably the
most lasting memory of her is the Mabel W.
Hoggard Elementary School.
"Only when the horizons of all children
have been broadened—when children are motivated
to move ahead, to secure the education
they must have in order to fill positions of
responsibility in our society—then, and only
then, will we be able to make much needed
change possible without undue painful conflict,"
Mrs. Hoggard said in 1974, when she
spoke to the Clark County School Trustees,
who renamed Bonanza Elementary School in
her honor.
Mrs. Hoggard had a great impact on children,
the community, the church, the NAACP
and people everywhere she went. Her dedication
to children and her contribution to her
profession and her community earned her the
respect and love of all whose lives she
touched. She was admired by many friends,
coworkers, and countless Las Vegans and her
passing leaves a void that will not easily be
forgotten. Her boundless energy, talent, and
zest for life serves as a true inspiration to us
all.
Mr. Speaker, the passing of Mrs. Mabel
Hoggard is a great loss to all Las Vegans and
Nevadans, but she leaves behind a legacy for
which her family and all Americans can be
proud.
• .
Truly, words are inadequate to
express our sincere appreciation
for your good thoughts, prayers
and other acts of sympathy
shown during the illness and
passing of our beloved wife,
mother, grandmother, great
grandmother and friend.
The Family of
Mabel Welch Wims Hoggard
XouRvew-Ve-i tAid
cTone I?,
THANK YOU
Our sincere thanks to everyone who expressed
support and sympathy during the
illness and the death of our beloved wife,
mother, grandmother, great grandmother
and friend
The Family of /
Mabel Welch Wims Hoggin J
K*s V-ec^sSL
J. XK=XH 3tK HK XX HH .
y We sincerely thank all persons who ex- [
pressed sympathy during the illness ~
and at the time of death of our beloved
wife, mother, grandmother, great
grandmother, and friend —
The Family of
Mabel Welch Wims Hoggard
- 114 WW
I
in-^5 Se>yK%e»\-Voice
I £"j UPf
MABELHOGGARD
Nevada
pioneer
leacherdies
By Bob Shemeligian
SUN Staff Writer
Mabel Hoggard,'.; the state's
first black school teacher when
she was hired in 1946 in Las Vegas,
died Wednesday night after a long
illness. She was ' -
a diminutive woman known
among family members and
friends as; a sensitive, caring
. person, Mrs. Hoggard was born
March 10, 1905, to Marshall and
Maybelle Welch in Pueblo, Colo.
» As a teenager, she worked during
the summertime for her
parents at the family grocery
stoj-e in Pueblo. The remainder of
the year, she lived with her
grandparents in Iowa and went to
elementary and high school in Des
Moines and Colfax, Iowa.
She told everyone she planned
to become a teacher! *..•••
In an interview 12 years" ago,
Mrs. Hoggard said, "I don't know
' of anything more important than
molding that young person, than
teaching. Without a foundation,
you can't build.','
Her husband of 42 years, J.
David Hoggard, former executive
director of the Clark County
Economic Opportunity Board,
said his wife was very, proud to be
recognizedin the history books as
Nevada's 'first black school
teacher. • . ,
"She liked to help and to1
educate people," he said. "You ask I
about, her hobbies and what she '
liked to do. - It'always involved »
people. She was dedicated to civic -
work, and she was an active life
member in the NAACP. She was '
always trying to help."
Mrs. Hoggard volunteered in a
See HOGGARD, Page 2B
Friday, June 2, 1989 Las Vegas SUN
Hoggard
Continued from Page 1B
number of organizations and
founded several programs to help
people — especially minorites.
In a pragmatic approach to
.help residents of West Las Vegas,
Mrs. Hoggard in 1975 founded
Project Savings at West Side
Federal Credit Union. She did this
to help children learn the yalue of
,a savings account. , ,;'a> ...; j;
i1,,/Among her achievements,'she
has ,been named a Distinguished
Nevadan by UNLV, and a local
school has been named after her.
More than 55Q students attend The
Mabel Hoggard Sixth Grade
Center at 950 N. Tonopah Drive.
She was named woman of the
year by several local clubs, and
was honored by the American Red
Sross, NAACP, Zion Methodist
Church, \Vesleyan Service Guild
m^ the Clark County Classroom
Feachers'iAssociation'. lvr.
•' After / graduating with ' a cum
aucje degree in education from
Bluefield State Teachers College
n West Virginia, Mrs. Hoggard
luickly. was hired as a .teaching
jrincipal in a two-room school
louse in Jenkins, Ky. She later
yprked^iri. the same capacity in
•Vest Virginia. •
It was during her tenure in
West Virginia that Mrs. Hoggard
frulyJ&rned the price of standing
up for, rights.
At the time, she said, the Democrats
. in the West Virginia
county were coming into office,
and they demanded that school
trustees take money from
teachers' salaries and put it into
party coffers.
"There were 32 black teachers,
and we joined hands and said, 'We
won't do it,"' Mrs. Hoggard said in
a 1977 interview. "Well, when it
got down to it, only four of us did
not and we were fired."
She came to Las Vegas in the
1940s for a visit, and decided to
stay. She quickly got a job in her
field, and her Aug. 16, 1946, contract
for $2,090, to teach second
grade at Westside Elementary
School is a milestone document.
"I try to do what I believe is
right," Mrs. Hoggard once said. "I
know sometimes you have to
fight, but everywhere you go you
find some people with the right
attitude."
Besides her husband, Mrs. Hoggard
is survived by two sons,
Chajles I. Wims of Oakland, Calif,
from a previous marriage, and J.
David Hoggard Jr. of Las Vegas.
She also is survived by eight
grandchildren and two greatgrandchildren.
Funeral arrangements are
pending.
-t-fWhere
I
tand
By Ruthe Deskin'^S^;'''-;1;^
No one is indispensable.
If that weren't true, the
world would have stopped
spinning a long time ago. There
always seems to be someone coming
along to take the place of those who
Ipave.
But in the case of two well-loved
Las Vegans, their shoes.will bevery
difficult to fill. They are almost Indispensable,
except that a higher
power has decided that we must go
forward without tfjeir presence.
Mabel Hoggard was a lady of great
dignitybnd determination.
She was one of the first people I
became involved with when I started
writing a column for this newspaper.
At the time, she was deeply concerned
over the education of children
on the "Westside" as West Las
Vegas was known at the time.
She railed against the second rate
education offered black students and
her efforts were instrumental in upgrading
the type of education received
by ail students, especially
minorities.
She believed that children should
be educated, but, as she so eloquently
proclaimed, "they can't learn on an
empty stomach."
It was Mabel who spearheaded the
school lunch program in Clark County's
schools.
Mabel and I had a special relationship.
When the phone rang and
the caller stated, "Hello, this is
Mabel, can we have lunch?" I always
chuckled and said, "What is your
latest crusade?"
Sure enough, after pleasantries
were exchanged, Mabel would outline
a new project to benefit the
community.
"I need your help," she would say,
and friends of this gracious lady knew
that was a demand to get involved.
As one reporter in the SUN
newsroom exclaimed on hearing of
her death, "She was working for civil
rights before most people knew what
the words meant."
See WHERE I STAND, Pafl® 2A
Tuesday, June 13,1989
' : !' ; By Ruthe Deskin
ge 1A
During her years as a teacher, and later as a community activjsV
Mabel addressed young people with tfi£ importance of education -j jfe
and preparatipn for the future, vzz- •• .tAI, , '-•""ji'zz-.
She worked diligently throuqWTJe Westside Credit Union to—~r:
enroll youngsters in a savlngsprogram. She believed that the way.
, minority child could succeej£®s through direction and sjylqfl-f.g,r
the years ahead. 44
Many of us truly loved Mabel Hoggard,-not. Just for her
contributions to society,"but for her wit'chanrryand compassion.
The world - our world at least — is much better for Mabel
having passed this way.
r
* 8 UN photo by LEE ZAICHICK
Friends and colleagues Friday recalled the contributions of Mabel Hoggard, whose portrait stands at left.
Hoggard's contributions to education recalled
Clark County Community College,
described Hoggard as "the
brightest star in our galaxy.... Her
effectiveness was only exceeded
by her willingness to share it with
others."
By Erik Pappa
SUN Staff Writer
Mabel Welch Wims Hoggard,
Nevada's first black teacher and a
prominent community activist,
w^as eulogized Friday for her tireless
cpntributions to education
and society.
"We will find solace in the
memories of her exemplary life,"
Shirley Barber, principal at the
sixth-grade center named in Hoggard's
honor, told a crowd of
about 150 people who gathered at
the Zion United Methodist Church.
Hoggard, 84, died May 31, and,
according to Pastor Marion Bennett,
"lived a long and useful life."
Barber was among a long line
of persons who spoke of fond
rpemories and the accomplishments
of the woman who in 1946
^ecame the state's first black
jjeacher. She worked for 25 years
as an elementary school instrutor
here.
"We were looking for some
good teachers," recalled thensuperintendent
Walter Johnson,
noting that previous superintendent
Maude Frazier told him
about an outstanding substitute
instructor.
"I immediately contacted her
and put her under contract,"
Johnson said.
Barber said Hoggard often visited
the West Las Vegas school,
and "the students were left with
love, admiration and . pride that
made them want to excel."
Charlotte Enus, a labor relations
manager for Reynolds Electrical
Engineering Company, recalled
having Hoggard as a
teacher in second grade at West
Side Elementary School. "Mrs.
Hoggard was very concerned
about us," Enus said, noting how
Hoggard would write notes home
to her parents and encourage her
to perform better.
"I hope I and others will carry
on the legacy of caring in the
community," she said.
Hoggard "was always an inspiration
to those who came into
contact with her," Bennett said.
"She lived a useful life, she lived a
devoted life, she lived an unselfish
life. The world has been bettered
for her having lived."
Hoggard's brother-in-law, J.
Clinton Hoggard, said she came to
Las Vegas after teaching for three
years in Kentucky and six years in
West Virginia. She was heading
for California when cousins
persuaded her to stay in Las
Vegas, he said.
He said her sojourn was not
such an easy one since she was
forced to battle racism.
"Children were her love and
her goal," the Rev. Jerome
Blankenship said, noting that one
of her proudest accomplishments
was her role in motivating the
Clark County School District to
establish a hot-lunch program.
Blankenship remembered that
Hoggard "would just corner you
and look at you." She would often
ask, "What are you reading this
day?" he recalled "What are you
studying, what new adventures
are you seeking?"
Dr. Paul Mecham, president of
UNLV representative Dr.
James Kitchen called Hoggard
"one of Nevada's greatest and
most influential citizens."
Hoggard played a leading role
in organizing Project Savings
within the Westside Federal
Credit Union, which was geared to
teaching young people how to
save and manage their money.
During the late 1940s, the Hoggard
house Was a home away
from home for many black busin
e s s p e o p l e , g o v e r n m e n t
employees and civil rights leaders
— prior to passage of the civil
rights acts and the public accommodation
law.
II
Nevada's first black teacher dies
By Marcia Austin
Review-Journal
Services are being planned for
Mabel Hoggard, Nevada's first
black school teacher, who died
Wednesday night in Las Vegas.
She was 84.
She was born on March 10,
1905, in Pueblo, Colo., where her
parents ran a grocery store.
During the summers, she
worked in the Colorado store,
where she informed one and- all
that someday she was going to be
a teacher.
She attended a small college on
the fringes of the South — the
Bluefield State Teachers College
in Bluefield, W.Va. — and received
her bachelor of science degree.
She did post graduate work
at the University of Southern
California and the University of
Nevada, Las Vegas.
In 1946 she became the first
black teacher hired in Nevada.
For the next 24 years she taught
first and second grades.
In 1962 she was honored by the
Las Vegas Rotary Club, which
cited her dedication to children
and her contributions to her profession
and her community. She
also received the Distinguished
Service Award from the Clark
County Teachers Association at
its annual banquet in 1968.
She was named woman of the
year by several clubs and was
honored by the American Red
Cross, NAACP, Zion Methodist
Church and Wesleyan Service
Guild at the Clark County Classroom
Teachers Association.
But, one,of the most noticable
honors and probably the most
lasting memory of her is the Mabel
W. Hoggard Elementary
School. The sixth grade center is
located at 950 N. Tonopah Drive.
"Only when the horizons of all
children have been broadened —
when children are motivated to
move ahead, to secure the education
they must have in order to
fill positions of responsibility in
Please see HOGGARD/4B
MABEL HOGGARD
...dead at 84
lal/Friday, June 2, 1989 a Hoggard-
From 1B
our society — then, and only then,
will we be able to make much needed
change possible without undue
painful conflict," Hoggard said in
1974 when she spoke to Clark
County School Trustees, who renamed
Bonanza Elementary
School in her honor.
Hoggard suffered from a series of
strokes but her community work
continued. She retired in 1970.
Martha Castaneva, office manager
at the sixth grade center, said
she has only worked in the school :
district for two years but she feels
honored to have known Hoggard
eveft for that short period.
"For the last two years the kindergartners
have given her a birthday
party. She's also been to the
last two Grandparents Days. She
was in a wheelchair each time but
she had such a good time, " Castaneva
said.
"I could see she enjoyed them all
but she especially enjoyed laughing
at the cute things the little ones
did and wanted to make sure all of
them got treats. The sixth-graders
recognized her from the picture in
the general office and whenever
she visited they ran up to greet
her."
NAACP President Rev. Jesse
Scott said he met. Hoggard when
he first moved to the city in 1970
and he has always considered her a
close and dear friend.
"You don't have enough time or
space for me to talk about her," he
said Thursday. "She was the epitomy
of a school teacher. She was
lovely, articulate, kind and had an
outgoing personality. She made a
big impact on children, the community,
the church, the NAACP
and people everywhere she went."
Survivors include her husband,
David; sons, J. David Hoggard Jr.
of Las Vegas and Charles I. Wims
of Oakland, Calif.; eight grandchildren
and two great-grandchildren, p

PROGRAM
WELCOME Mrs. Shirley Barber
PRAYER - Rev. Jesse Scott
RESOLUTION Senator Joe Neal
Assemblyman, Wendell P. Williams
Assemblyman, Robert Gaston
Assemblyman, Morse Arberry
Senator, Richard Bryan
Senator, Harry Reid - Office
Rep. Mr. Mujahid Ramadan
Congressman, James Bilbray - Office
Rep. Mr. Franklin Simpson
PROCLAMATION
From Gov. Robert Miller's Office Senator Joe Neal
^ Mr. Herbert Freeman
Accompanist, Mrs. Juanita Williams
AUDIO PRESENTATION Mabel Hoggard's Chorus
Director, Mrs. Pamela Owens
Accompanist, Mrs. Ruthy Stull
REMARKS n T _
Dr. James Pughsley
Dr. Paul Meachem
Mrs. Daisy Miller
Mrs. Dora Harris
Rev. Jesse Scott
Bishop James Cox
Mrs. Lubertha Johnson
Mr. Albert McNeil
BENEDICTION
Rev. Jesse Scott
• ' » — "• . - v -x- •
ELTON OARRSTT
.Pioneer Newspaperman
v
si tt.s4.slS
ORAN GRAGSON
...Four-Term Mayor
I ?•. > • 7 V-'.:.
J M mi
MABCL HOGGARD
...First Black Teacher
LAS VEGAS SUN Saturday Festivities
Thrse Las
Wednesday, May IS, 3377
r@f0i
The honorary title "Distinguished Nevadan" will be
bestowed upon three longtime business, educational and
civic leaders Saturday at commencement exercises for the
University of Nevada, Las Vegas.
Awards will be presented to Oran Gragson, four-term
mayor of Las Vegas; Mabel W. Hoggard, the first black
school teacher in Nevada, and Elton M. Garrett, pioneer
newspaperman and realtor.
The three, who have served the Southern Nevada
community for an average of more than 40 years each, will
be honored during ceremonies at 2 p.m. in the Aladdin
Hotel's Theatre for the Performing Arts.
Announcement of the selection of the recipients was
made by Dr. Donald H. Baepler, UNLV president.
Each year,_ the "Distinguished Nevadan" awards are
voted by the University Board of Regents and conferred by
UNLV to individuals who have made a "significant contribution
to the advancement of our State and Nation, and for
exceptional sendee to the well-being of mankind."
ORAN GRAGSON
Gragson is the only person in the history of Las Vegas
to be elected mayor four time3 — a 16-year period from 1959
to 1975. He managed the affairs of city government during
a time when the community tripled in population.
Serving on dozens of boards, commissions and study
committees concerned with the community's progress,
Gragson spearheaded the development of new parks,
freeways, facilities for senior citizens, cultural and recreational
centers during his tenure as mayor.
He has been chairman of the Las'Vegas Convention
Authority, president of the Nevada Municipal Association
and chairman of the Southern Nevada Manpower Planning
Council, among many other posts.
Gragson came to Nevada in 1932 as a 21-year-old
construction worker, riding the cables high over the wet
concrete of Hoover Dam.
During the 1940s and '50s, he succeeded in operating his
own garage and furniture businesses before entering the
mayor's race as a political novice in 1959.
Honored on countless occasions, Gragson was selected in
1968 to receive the Fioreilo LaGuardia Award as America's
Outstanding Mayor, a citation earned by or.ly four other
mayors in the country's history.
Today, he serves as director of the Downtown Progress
Association in Las Vegas and as a consultant to management
and labor. He is this year's Cancer Crusade chairman in
Clark County.
MABEL W. HOGGARD
Hoggard became the state's first biack school teacher
when she was hired in 1946, without a contract, for a single
school term at the old Westside School in Las Vegas. She
stayed there 17 years before moving on to teach elementary
mi f\« 0% K r\ i 'fiJ %?,*
a
1a m J M 11«B -^r A 0 m 0•\ryi *
students at Matt Kelly, Highland and C.V.T. Gilbert schools
Regents will cite Hoggard for her work to further quality
education, racial integration and equal opportunity in the
classrooms.
Before her arrival in Las Vegas, she had served as a
teaching principal in schools in Kentucky and West Virginia
She earned a bachelor of science degree cum laude i'rom
Bluefieid State Teachers College and has done post-graduate
work at the University of Chicago, the University of
California, Los Angeles, and at UNLV.
Hoggard served in 1969 as chairwoman of the Westside
Council, a group which was instrumental in establishing a
district-wide lunch program in the Las Vegas elementary
schools. She has held posts on executive boards of the Las
Vegas branch of the NAACP, the Las Vegas Community
Concert Association, and the Southern Nevada Teachers of
English and Foreign Languages.
In addition, she was twice secretary of the Clark County
Chapter of the American Red Cross and treasurer of the Las
Vegas Classroom Teachers' Association.
For her contributions, the school district has bestowed
upon her its Distinguished Service Award and renamed one
of its schools — Bonanza Elementary — in her honor in 1974.
ELTON M. GARRETT
Garrett, a real estate broker in Boulder City, came to Las
Vegas in 1929 to report on tne construction of Hoover Dam
for the region's first newspaper — the Las Vegas Age —
which he later edited.
Settling in Boulder City, he served successively as
principal of the city's public schools, editor of the Boulder
City Journal and News, ana president of the town's Chamber
of Commerce.
He worked in the 1940s as chairman of the Boulder City-
Coordinating Councii to solve some of the unique problems
associated with a town owned wholly by the federal
government.
Later, as president of the Clark County Civic Sendee
Federation, he rallied support to secure water for the
townspeople and proposed some of the first flood control
legislation in Southern Nevada.
His chairmanship of the Clark County Legislative Council,
composed of more than 50 county organizations throughout
the 1950s, was marked by efforts to bring parks, industrial
and economic development to Boulder City and a university
to Southern Nevada.
It was Garrett's work that assured passage of the Boulder
Bill of 1958, leading to Boulder City's first self governnrnu
two years later.
For 2i years, he also served as commissioner of the Lake
Mead National Recreation Area, attempting always to open
the scenic region to more tourism.