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Las Vegas branch NAACP records: documents, correspondence

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Date
1946 to 1986
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Folder of materials from the Mabel Hoggard Papers (MS-00565) -- Civic engagement file. National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) certificate, journal, radio script, program booklets, and correspondence. This folder includes a policy statement of the NAACP, certificate of merit, education department features booklet, Gala Celebration and Awards Banquet booklets, and NAACP Historical Committee documents.

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man000696
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man000696. Mabel Hoggard Papers, 1903-2011. MS-00565. Special Collections and Archives, University Libraries, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Las Vegas, Nevada. http://n2t.net/ark:/62930/d1sb4197s

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English

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Script for Had io Program "TIL^. FOH LVMYO8W' 7:30 p.m* July 10.1946 TiMKxrMagua^ *
L-L-rr-o-
Las Vegas,Nevada
Wm.H.S tsvsns, Jr .
CTX "Introducing the N.A.A.C.P*"
"TH d FOR MKRYCNS” is a very fitting title for a public library radio projrlajnJ A public library is a democratic institution,because It ie
dedicated to dessiminate knowledge to everyone. Mrs.Sara Lee Stadelman, truly making thia a democratic program by offering time to every is interested in making democracy work*
The N.A.A.C.P* le tbuely interested* It ia a known fact that a chain la no itQnjger than its weakest link;that a "house divided against itself cannot-stand". Die Negro la a link In the chain of America* Too often the bijorlty group in the house of Ameriea,by its indifference,if not
its troatdlity,has tax divided this minority group into a disfranchised discriminated and exploited people. But in shackling the Negro,America dill idly succeed in binding herself* Something must be dome to free all America,for she will not be totally free if some of her citizens are not given the opportunity to enjoy the fruits of liberty*
Concerning tills situation,william Bigllsh Walling queried in ISOS,, ... "Who realizes the seriousness of the situation, and what x large and
powerful body of citizens Is ready to cose to their aid?»
Mary White Ovington read Nr.Walllngton's article. She accepted his challenge through correspondence,and in the first week of the year ISOS, a meeting was held in New York*
It was decided to issue a call,for a National Conference on the Negro question. In response to the call,a conference was held in 1909* After a year of excellent organization,numbering their membership in the hundreds,a second conference was held in 1910. It was then that a permanent- body was organized to be known as the National Association
for the Advancement of Colored People
Is needed wore than ever tod ay»for we have just
fought m that the world might be freejbut still there is much to be done
So the onal 1946 slogan of the N.A.A.C.P, is "Finish thr Fight."Our las
national policy;for we must
finish
and su standard dwellings,caused by
di str! We must finish the fight to assure to every citizen,irrespective
equality of opportunity and equality before the law,which underlie
e fight to guarantee to every citizen the right to buy in the
lace,to eat in the public restaurant,to receive equal entertainment
ccomodatione for equal prices paid* Our government must be "a
governm of the people,by the people,for the people,"*if it in should not
perish the earth
The Las Vegas branch is in the midst of its 1946 membership campaign
Svery citizen interested in "finishing the fight" to make our world a world
of opportunity for all,is urged to join the N.A.A.C.P. Already our mayor,
P.’s 6-fold purpose
1 on
Item ft
>ayin2
lumber 5,"to stimulate...cultural life..*",is really another way of
that we wholeheartedly endorse the "SPONSOR A MLLF" program being
by our public library. /
city manager,and other prominent Las Vegas citizens have taken 1946 member*
ships. We meet the first Tuesday of each month at the Jefferson Avenue
Community Center. There will be a special meeting next Tuesday,July 16,at
3 P.m. You are welcome, when you pay your membership of tzl.vv or more,you
should be given a temporary receipt ’til you receive a membership card from
the Rational Office.On the back of each membership card you will find the
N.A.A
Vegas Stanch is working hand in hand with the
kN The wopk^of the N.A.A.C.P
fight here to rid our city of inadequate housing MxmSttw conditions
denial of MA loans in "across the tracks'
Row,in 1946,the K.A.A.6.P. has branches in every American city which contains
progressive,community minded citizens. There are also sELLW.EUSx college
campus branches and junior N.A.A.C.P. members under 21 years of agezmembers ^of
many ages,races,and climes.
of col
our Am‘i0j|n institutions,and are guaranteed by the Constitution. We must
finish
market
and eq
I shall do everything is my power to interest our branch in giving the
prise of a book per month to our library;for we should have for your
enlightenment and enjoyment,such books in our library as Nra.Ztadelman
has just reviewed,(Sva Sell Thompson’s ’American Daughter*) and others
lik
Such
our
conclude with the first Let L< and last stanzas of a poem written by the
late •a&es Weldon John son,-one-time United States Consul to Venenela and
Nicaragua,and former National Secretary of the N.a.a.C.P. The poem was
rl L.Downs’ "Meet the Negro",-Langs ton Hughes’ "The Dream Keeper"
loks present word pictures which will show you our dreams,
les,our aspirations,our accomplishments,and our contributions to
America;-we citizens who are America’a every tenth wltizwxx person.
sic by his brother, Dr .Charles S« John son, who is one of the United
Stat educators now in Japan helping
The song by k these two renowned
to revise their educational system
brothers is known as theMaT onal
set
Negro Antheffi**.
TA/Uift every voice and sing * til earth and heaven ring*
\VMng with the harmonies of liberty,
\ /Let our rejoicing rise high as the listening skies*
I Let it resound loud as the rolling sea.
I Sing a song full of the faith that the dark past has taught us,
"Sing a song full of the hope that the present has brmight us*
facing the rising sun of a new day begun,
Let us march on *til victory is won.
God of our weary years,God of our silent tears* -
Thou who hast led us thus far on the way* I
Thou who host by Thy might led us into the light*!
Keep us forever in the path,we pray; J
Lest our feet stray from the pv£k places our God where we met Mee,
Lest our hearts drunk with the wine of the world we forget Thee,*
May we forever stand shadowed beneath Thy hand,
True to our God, true to our native land."
A POLICY STATEMENT
OF THE
NAACP
ON THE
ECONOMIC WELL-BEING
OF BLACKS
FORE WORD
We continue to live in a dual and unequal society. In spite of all past victories, our struggle has reached a new plateau. Therefore, without diminishing our dedication to civil rights in all of its traditional forms, we must now focus a considerable amount of our energies on steering the economic engines which drive our society. This document is our guide.
Accordingly, its central objective is to provide an analysis of the economic problems we face and a clear statement of our priorities.
The reader will note that the key concepts in this document are mobility and Investment. Our economic aspirations call for removing the barriers to economic progress as well as surmounting those barriers which remain unyielding even in the face of common and simple justice.
Like those who have gone before us, we undertake this struggle not only for ourselves, but for future generations.
Margaret Bush Wilson
Chairman
September 22, 1980
FOREWORD
For more than 71 years, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People has labored assiduously to eliminate every vestige of racial discrimination in this nation. Throughout its history, the Association has held as its principal objectives the following:
1)
To eliminate racial discrimination and segregation from all aspects of public life.
2)
To secure the ballot.
31 To seek justice in the courts.
4)
To secure legislation barring discrimination and segregation.
5)
To secure equal job opportunities.
6)
To end mob violence and police brutality.
These were and remain the principal concerns of the NAACP. While we have eliminated many of the visible forms of racial discrimination, the pernicious forms of systemic discrimination are still prevalent in the body politic of our nation. As we have struggled over the years to eliminate dual school systems, dual public accommodation, and dual employment standards,our task now is to eliminate the dual economy. The economic liberation of black Americans is essential to our participation in the mainstream of American life. To this end, we have embarked upon a new and promising endeavor at the beginning of this decade. We shall assault the bastions of economic exclusivity and demand our full and rightful share of this nation’s abundance.
Over the years our staff, undermanned and overworked has struggled to develop a comprehensive program to deal with the economic problems we face as a people. Hinton King, Michael Meyers, Mildred Bond Roxborough, William Penn, Althea Simmons, Charles Carter and others worked on five-year plans tailored to address the issues delineated in this document.
We believe that the Association can will play a major role in the decades ahead in eliminating the remaining vestiges of discrimination and removing the stigma of color which still plague this nation and cloud her horizons.
BENJAMIN L. HOOKS
EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR
September 22, 1980
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
This document has evolved from the efforts of many dedicated persons and the financial support of many thoughtful donors. To Margaret Bush Wilson, and Hobart Taylor, Jr., we are especially appreciative for their suggestions and their efforts which generated financial support.
Its author is Dr. Herrington J. Bryce, Chief Economic Consultant to the NAACP and President, National Policy Institute.
In preparing and developing the final version, Dr. Bryce was very ably assisted by Dr. Ralphael Thelwell, Director, NAACP Economic Analysis Unit and Constance Solan, Research Assistant, Barbara Buhl and Evelyn Harvey.
We also profited from the deliberations of the Economic Advisory Council whose members are Dr. Andrew F. Brimmer, Dr. Paul W. McCracken, Dr. Bernard Gifford and especially the contributions of Dr. Bernard E. Anderson, Dr. Karl Dwight Gregory, Sir W. Arthur Lewis and Dr. Phyllis A. Wallace.
Additionally, many helpful comments and advice were given by Dr. Robert C. Weaver, former Secretary HUD, Cushing Dolbere, Elizabeth Koontz, Jeanne Fox, Lorenzo Morris and William Morris.
The counsel and recommendations of the NAACP Policy & Plans Committee were of great benefit as was the work of the NAACP staff which is reflected in this document.
TABLE OF CONTENTS
TOPIC
Page
Preamble ...................................................... 1
Introduction.................................................... 2
Unemployment and Economic Growth , ............................ 4
Industry, Occupation and Labor Force Participation ............ 7
Location of the Black Population ............................. 10
Education and Training...................... 12
Artificial Barriers: Discrimination, Regulations .............. 16
Military and Veterans’ Status.....................................17
Crime and Justice................................................19
Property and Ownership ......................................... 21
Politics . ........................................................25
Business Development ........................................... 27
International ................................................. 30
Poverty ...........................................................32
The Keys to the Future: Mobility and Investment
34
—1—
PREAMBLE
The National Association for the Advancement of Colored People will continue to fight to eliminate racial discrimination that has produced a society which, while permitting some of us to rise into middle-class status, continues to be dual and unequal for a disproportionate majority of blacks. The result of the dual and unequal economic system in which we live is a persistent and growing discrepancy between the average incomes. of blacks and whites, and the frightening possibility that after years of struggle, our relative economic position will begin to deteriorate.
Therefore, while our struggle for equal and Improved treatment in education housing, voting and the legal system continues unabated, the future demands that we focus a considerable amount of our efforts on eliminating the debilitative effects of a dual and unequal economy which limps along well below full employment; and which, even at high levels of employment, makes only a limited number of its well-paying jobs available to blacks.
In rededicating ourselves to this struggle, we continue to act in the tradition of the founding principles of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People: "...to insure the political, educational, social and economic equality of minority citizens..." This document identifies some of the policies which the Association shall pursue to meet its objective:
the attainment of equality in the economic well-being of blacks and whites.
—2—
INTRODUCTION
Economic inequality arising from the dual and unequal society ultimately expresses itself in the unequal ability of blacks to meet their needs and the needs of their children. Therefore, the closing of'the income gap between blacks and whites is a specific target which this plan addresses. The median black family income is currently 59 percent of the median white family income and 86 percent of the family income of Hispanics. This ratio represents not only a major economic gap, but a reversal from where we were in 1970 when black family income was 61 percent of white income. Indeed, in every year since 1970, black family income has steadily declined relative to white family income. A continuation of this trend is unacceptable.
It is generally recognized that one reason for lower median family incomes among blacks is the higher proportion of one-parent households. Even after this effect is removed, however, we nevertheless discover a discrepancy, especially among men where the median earnings of black men who are year-round workers are only 70 percent of their white counterparts. The median earnings among black females who are year-round workers has risen to 90 percent of the earnings (wages) of white females who are also year-round workers. But all females and black males have earnings which have remained consistently below the earnings of white men.
This implies that even if there were fewer single-parent households among blacks, there would still be a considerable descrepancy in earnings that would be deserving of attention. Hence, if the income gap between blacks and whites is to be closed, the earnings of blacks must increase at a significantly faster rate than the earnings of whites. It is the only way to catch up.
Increased income is a prerequiste to increasing wealth, which will in turn generate more income. The family income gap is due to a number of factors.
These include education, experience, occupational and industrial concentration
—3—
of black workers, the location of the residence of these workers, the size and composition of households and the number of workers in each household, wealth and investment activities as well as past and present racial discrimination, which cuts across all of these factors.
In its resolve to improve the economic well-being of blacks, the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People will examine the factors contributing to the income gap, which are discussed below.
—4—
UNEMPLOYMENT AND ECONOMIC GROWTH
A crucial factor in the determination of income is employment. About 95 percent of the incomes of black families and 82 percent of the incomes of white families are derived from employment. The unemployment rate of blacks continues to be roughly twice the rate of whites. This year, the rate of unemployment of blacks has already catapulted to 14 percent,
The lowest unemployment rates the black population has attained in the past 20 years ranged from 6.4 percent in 1969 to 9.6 percent in 1964 — a period of generally low unemployment in the economy as a whole. Since October of 1974, black unemployment has consistently been in double digit figures — rising from 10 percent in 1974 and reaching a peak of 13.9 percent in 1975. It now stands near that peak, at 12.6 percent, compared to 6.2 percent for whites.
For different segments of the black population, the unemployment rate varies. Among teenagers it has never been much below 25 percent in a high employment year such as 1969, and for the past five years it has hovered around 40 percent. Since 1975, unemployment among adult black men and adult black women has been in the neighborhood of 11 percent.
The causes of these high unemployment rates are easily identified. Basic to high unemployment rates is the low rate of noninflationary growth in the economy as a whole. Every year, there are more people entering the labor force than are leaving existing jobs. For these additional workers, new jobs must be created. Without sufficient economic growth generating new employment opportunities, the economy is unable to provide the needed new jobs.
Growth is essential, but because of the dual and unequal economy we do not forsee that economic growth by itself will remove the disparity of incomes or bring the unemployment rates of blacks below 6 percent. As shown earlier, even in past periods of low unemployment and high growth, the black unemployment
—5—
rate exceeded 6 percent and was double that of whites.
It is quite possible that the major thrust for increasing noninflationary growth - increased productivity - could lead to a decline in employment if the productivity increase results from the more intensive use of improved technology and capital which replaces labor. Thus, while favoring non-inflationary growth, the Association also favors a long-term program of making blacks more occupationally mobile.
The key to eliminating the dual and unequal economy is attaining a greater share of higher-paying private sector jobs in a growing economy. Manpower programs are necessary to fight structural as well as cyclical unemployment. Such programs are necessary in all market-oriented economies. The necessary overrepresentation of blacks in these progams, however, is more symptomatic of the economic ills generated by the dual and unequal economies than of the long-run objectives of the black population. In the long-run, it is the expansion of opportunities for employment and upward mobility in the private sector which must be our major objectives.
It is in the private sector that most Americans are employed and better paid. In spite of the rapid growth in public sector employment, it employs only 16 percent of the labor force. The private sector is, therefore, the primary source of employment in our mixed economic system even though in recent years public sector employment has grown rapidly.
To meet the objectives of providing full employment opportunities for the black community, the NAACP will:
1.
Seek the implementation of monetary and fiscal policies to reduce unemployment by encouraging policies to promote economic growth through greater business investment in the domestic economy.
2.
Seek the attainment of full employment as contained in the original
version of the Humphrey-Hawkins bill.
Seek the implementation of anti-inflation policies consistent with rather than at the expense of, full employment.
Seek the implementation of programs to reduce structural unemployment in order to reduce and eliminate the employment differences among
blacks and whites.
—7—
INDUSTRY, OCCUPATION AND LABOR FORCE PARTICIPATION
A second aspect of the dual and unequal economy and a reason for high rates of unemployment and low earnings among blacks is the concentration of the black labor force in industries and occupations which are becoming a decling share of the total economy or which are growing slower than other sectors. For example, as of 1979, 23 percent of all black workers were employed in manufacturing.
But manufacturing accounts for a declining share of total employment. To the extent that present and future black employment possibilities are in slow^growing portions of the manufacturing sector, black emploument prospects will be reduced. The rapidly growing high technology portion of manufacturing and the professional service sectors are areas to which future growth in black employment may fruitfully be oriented.
A third aspect of the dual and unequal economy and a reason for the high unemployment rate and lower earnings among blacks is the concentration of black unemploument in manual occupations — many of which pay relatively low wages. As recently as 1977, some 75 percent of black male workers and 55 percent of black female workers were in manual employment compared to 53 percent of white men and 34 percent of white women. The continued concentration of blacks in manual occupations is an unwelcome sign for the future since the major growth in the economy is in professional occupations, such as business, science, engineering and health; occupations in which blacks are seriously underrepresented.
About 12 percent of black men and 16 percent of black women compared to 30 percent of white men and 22 percent of white women are employed in professional and managerial jobs. These professional and managerial jobs are the ones with fast growth rates, high pay and status. They are jobs in which blacks are seriously underrepresented and the jobs that require the greatest amount of
preparation.
—8—
There are some professions in which blacks are presently concentrated that are likely to grow rapidly. The most significant of these is the secretarial occupation. However, caution is required since this profession is undergoing rapid technological change. With the introduction of new office technology and the influx of college educated men and women into this profession, there undoubtedly will be changing tasks and eligibility requirements — which could mean a significant upgrading of the profession. Blacks currently in secretarial work could find it more competitive than ever. Upgrading of secretarial skills will be wise.
Being in a growing occupation increases income and employability, but it is not enough to eliminate dual and unequal treatment. In every occupation - even among professionals and managers - the black unemployment rate exceeds that of whites.
Another aspect of the dual and unequal economy and a fourth reason for low earnings among blacks is the lower labor force participation rate for blacks. Black male teenagers with work experience declined from 67.3 percent in 1966 to 47.2 percent in 1977. There was no such trend among whites. Some 30 percent of black men and half of the black women are outside of the labor force — figures which are not too drastically dissimilar for whites. However, the reasons for not participating are quite different. For blacks the reasons are discouragement (3 percent), attendance at school (20 percent), retirement (12 percent), engagement in household activities (39 percent) and health and disability (14 percent). Of these the major malady is disability which is claimed by 14 percent of blacks compared to 8 percent of whites. Reducing disability among black workers by one half could significantly raise the black labor
force participation rate.
—9—
Discouragement constitutes a numerically small fraction of the reasons for being outside of the labor force. However, discouragement has a long-term impact in creating attitudes toward the labor market and it reflects the hopeless outlook that many blacks have about the labor market.
Accordingly, a major thrust of the NAACP economic program is to:
1.
Increase the entry of blacks into growing occupations and industries where earnings are high.
2.
Support minority designed and operated counseling programs to facilitate both entry-level employment and upward job mobility.
3.
Identify and remove obstacles to upward mobility of blacks.
—IOLOCATION
OF THE BLACK POPULATION
A fifth aspect of the dual and unequal economy and another reason for the high unemployment rates and low earnings among blacks is the concentration of the black population in older central cities, older suburbs and declining rural or nonmetropolitan areas. Most of these locations have lost substantial parts of their employment base. Nearly 55 percent of blacks live in central cities where the unemployment rate is 12.6 percent, 19 percent live in suburban communities with an unemployment rate of 8.6 percent, and 26 percent live in nonmetropolitan areas where the unemployment rate is 11.1 percent. From 1973 to 1979, employment in central cities grew by only 5 percent while in the suburbs and nonmetropolitan areas employment grew by 22 percent and 15 percent respectively.
A similar situation holds regionally. The rise of the energy-producing sectors as a central core of employment in our economy means a rise in employment in the inter-Mountain states and the Appalachian states. Manufacturing employment for other reasons has also grown rapidly in the Mountain states as well. The continued gorwth of manufacturing and retailing in the South bodes well for blacks since there is a high concentration of blacks in that region. The location of blacks in the South is fortunate not only for future employment opportunities but also because of the rapid rise of income in the South. Other than the Southern region, the distribution of the black population does not match the distribution of future economic activity. Even within the South, manufacturing employment is growing most rapidly in the East and West South Central states, not in the South Atlantic states which contain a high concentration of blacks.
The high proportion of blacks in the South is no assurance that they will benefit equally in the economic advancement of that area. The issue goes beyond the question of historical discrimination. The economic advancement of the area is matched by an influx of population from other
areas. Hence, Southern blacks will have to compete not only with the
-Il-
present population but with new migrants from other parts of the country as well as from abroad.
Clearly, to increase employment and earnings opportunities in the future, there will be a need for greater mobility of blacks to areas where employment prospects are greatest. Traditionally, black mobility has been hampered by discrimination in housing as well as in employment. Mobility is also hampered by moving costs. For example, only if moved by a firm, or if income is sufficiently high so that one can deduct moving expenses, can the moving cost be shared. But for many blacks neither opportunity is present.
Therefore, the NAACP will:
1.
Support policies to revitalize cities.
2.
Support policies that encourage the participation of minorities in the benefits of urban revitalization.
3.
Promote policies which provide a fair locational choice to those blacks who may choose to reside outside of central cities and in those areas of the country where
economic growth is favorable.
—12—
EDUCATION AND TRAINING
Insufficient training and preparation are undoubtedly a sixth aspect of the dual and unequal economy and a factor in explaining the relatively high unemployment and lower earnings among blacks. Yet, the Association cautions against the excessive weight given to these two factors. To the extent that training and preparation are the consequence of experience, then it is the lack of employment opportunities which perpetuates itself. This is one reason why high unemployment among black youth is particularly disturbing.
Furthermore, the higher rates of unemployment and lower earnings among blacks have persisted even though the educational gap between the black and white populations has been closing. Although they are important, differences in the quality of education cannot conceivably be the major factor that explains why white females with less than 8 years of education have an 8.8 percent unemployment rate compared to a 12 percent rate for black females who have completed 12 years of education. Neither is quality of education sufficient to explain why the unemployment rate among black men with 4 years of college is 4.2 percent - a rate that is not significantly lower than the 4.7 percent unemployment rate of white men with only a high school education. Granted, quality of education and work experience could go a long way toward explaining a part of the unemployment difference between black and white high school graduates; but among high school graduates the unemployment rate is 5.0 percent for whites compared to 12.8 percent for blacks — more than a 2 to 1 ratio. The Association recognizes the importance of the quality of education on these statistics and, as will be discussed later, will pursue a vigorous program to attain it for our youth.
While education cannot be expected to equalize earnings by itself, it is certain that a lower quality or quantity of education received by blacks
could only exacerbate the income gap. Over the years, there has been con-
—13—
siderable progre ss in increasing black enrollment at all levels of school. The enrollment of blacks is now 99 percent for the elementary level; 98 percent for high school; and roughly 26 percent of the 18 - 19 year olds and 23 percent of the 20 - 21 year olds are in college. Approximately 42 percent of those blacks enrolled in colleges and universities are in two- year institutions. It is among the 18-19 -year-olds that the differences with whites are most striking. Twenty-one percent of black 18-19-year-olds are enrolled in high school compared to 8 percent of whites. Furthermore, of that age group, 15.6 percent of the whites and 24.2 percent of the blacks are not in school and do not hold a high school diploma. The higher black enrollment simply means that it takes blacks longer to get a high school education.
At the. same time that enrollments are increasing, however, there are clear and repeated signs that a very large proportion of our youth remain functionally illiterate. Data from both rich and poor school districts reveal declining reading and computational skills.
In addition, while the enrollment of blacks on the graduate level has increased, the fields of specialization are the traditional ones — rather than the most rapidly growing and remunerative ones. The National Center for Educational Statistics reports that in 1977, approximately 56 percent of doctoral degrees received by blacks were in education compared to 25 percent for whites. Less than one percent of black doctoral graduates received their degrees in mathematics, and only about one percent in business and management, health, agriculture and natural resources. Only four percent
earned their degrees in the physical sciences.
-14-—
The National Advisory Committee on Black Higher Education and Black Colleges and Universities reports that nearly half of all blacks attending four- year institutions are attending the 105 historically black colleges or universities. It is important to recognize the unique role played by black colleges and universities, which in many states produce the majority of blacks who enter the wellpaying professions. At the same time, however, because of the large number of black youth who should attend college, we should broaden the opportunities for those who seek to enroll in all institutions of higher learning.
While the connection between resources and educational success might be complex, it is evident that adequate resources are necessary to conduct an educational system of high quality. At all levels of education, but particularly at the elementary level, the lack of resources is likely to become acute because of the various limits placed on spending and taxation, in particular the property tax upon which local shcool districts rely. These taxes limit revenues for operating expenses and increase the cost of capital required to improve school plants.
Recognizing the central role of quality education, the NAACP proposes to:
1.
Support counselling which guides black students to growing professions and occupations such as health, science, engineering, business and management, and specific blue collar skills which have a promising future.
2.
Support programs intended to increase the pre-school training of black children, the amount of resources available to schools attended by blacks, and the quality of education received by black youngsters.
3.
Support policies to increase the involvement of parents, the media, and religious and fraternal organizations in advancing the
—15—
value of education among black youth.
4.
Support and strengthen predominantly black colleges and universities, which continue to educate a high proportion of black youth, as a means of equalizing the resources distributed within higher education.
5.
Support the accountability of and retention of successful school personnel.
6.
Address the serious problem of discrimination and disparate treatment of students and professionals on major campuses.
—16—
ARTIFICIAL BARRIERS: DISCRIMINATION, REGULATIONS
There are many artificial barriers to the attainment of higher incomes and greater employment of blacks. Among these are racial discrimination in employment, wages, training and promotion as practiced by public and private employers of all types.
Although many government regulations are needed and serve a desirable purpose, a second type of artificial barrier is represented by those various federal, state and local regulations which restrict employment either directly or through bidding up the cost of labor. These regulations cover wages and other labor costs, environmental practices, the promotion of foreign trade, the location of productive activities, the restraint of competition, the restrain on entry into occupations and lines of production, tax laws and even the failure of some regulations and incentives to more effectively increase the employment and earnings of blacks even though, like the employment tax credit, they could work to do so.
A third type of barrier is represented by "credentialism," which requires higher personnel qualifications than are necessary to properly discharge certain functions. This practice has the effect of disqualifying blacks not on the basis of ability or performance, but on the basis of artificial high educational requirements.
Accordingly, the NAACP proposes to:
1.
Continue to pursue litigation against discrimination in the labor market as practiced by employers, unions and government.
2.
Continue to fight discriminatory practices which serve as barriers to the entry of blacks into these areas of employment.
3.
Maintain a clearinghouse which studies the social and economic impacts of new and existing government regulations that affect black earnings
and employment.
4.
Implement the gains from the Weber case by developing a role for the various branches and regional units of the NAACP.
—17—
MILITARY AND VETERANS’ STATUS
Another aspect of the dual and unequal economy and a reason for the high unemployment and low incomes of blacks is that while the armed services are an increasingly important employer of blacks, military experience fails to serve blacks as well as it does whites. In 1972, there were nearly 250,000 blacks comprising 12.6 percent of the armed forces; today, there are some 338,000 blacks accounting for approximately 19.9 percent of the forces. These blacks are disproportionately represented among the lower ranks E-l through E-4.
The unemployment rate among black veterans 25-39 years of age is 7.9 percent compared to 3.3 percent for white veterans of the same age. This difference is in part attributable to the inadequate preparation these black veterans received for non-civilian jobs during their military tenure. A disproportionately large number of black military personnel learn combat skills that have no civilian use.
It is not the desire of the Association to insist upon training and assignments which are in conflict with the job of the military and its primary responsibility to defend the nation. There are, however, several jobs and training opportunities within the military which can be a useful source of preparation for upward mobility within the military, as well as preparation for non-military employment. The Association is acutely aware that the armed forces, as employer and trainer of black youth, will have a crucial role in any solution of the problem of youth unemployment in the dual and unequal economy. The Association is also concerned with the immediate problem of upgrading blacks already in the military, and the possibilities of improving military training to provide skills usable by those who choose to return to the civilian sector.
The Association continues its concern over the quality of military
justice for black servicemen.
—18—
Accordingly, the NAACP will:
1.
Seek to obtain more effective training for blacks in the military.
2.
Seek to obtain assignments and promotions consistent with enhancing upward mobility of blacks within the military and in the civilian world.
3.
Promote an increase in the number of black senior officers in all branches of the armed forces,
4.
Resist all restrictions on the voluntary recruitment and employment of blacks in the armed forces.
5.
Encourage comparable pay standards for the military.
—19—
CRIME AND JUSTICE
This is a subject that we recognize deserves a more thorough treatment. It is being discussed here to indicate that we are aware of its economic impact. The existence of dual and unequal treatment under the law often reinforces the dual and unequal aspects of the economy.
The Association can take no comfort in the fact that dual and unequal treatment under the law minimizes the actual importance of white collar crime, which undoubtably inflicts a large economic cost on the society, and which, because the dual and unequal economic system, is almost the exclusive province of whites. We must instead reduce the number of blacks who are attracted to any type of crime. Crime increases the prospect of unemployment, which reduces legally earned income and leads to further crime. We are especially concerned about those blacks who turn to crime because the dual and unequal economy offers them too few opportunities to achieve their potential.
Part of the task of combating crime is providing adequate rehabilitation in the nation’s prisons. There are 298,000 blacks and other minorities in the nation's prisons. The sad state of these institutions and the deficiences of their rehabilitation programs are well known. Part of the explanation of the high rate of recidivism lies in the failure of these programs to furnish skills for successful competition in and adaptation to the outside world.
In 1978, a disproportionate share - 23.2 percent - of all arrests of persons under 18 years of age were black. According to at least one prevailing school of thought, this tendency toward crime is stimulated by the essential features of a dual economy — low Incomes, poverty, high unemployment — and arrest and conviction rates that are in part the reflection of a dual and unequal treatment of black youths under the law. There is little question, however, that in spite of the weight of these factors in propelling youth to crime and
—20—
subsequent unemployment, it remains the responsibility of the black community to provide the support system which deters crime even in the face of high unemployment. The community is always at risk.
It is estimated by the Census Bureau in a study done for the Justice Department that about half of all household burglaries are preventable merely by doing simple things such as closing doors and windows. Indeed, a high proportion of teenage crime is said to be the result of opportunity rather than premeditation.
Therefore, the NAACP will:
1.
Work with communities in various types of anti-crime measures.
2.
Improve the quality of police services to gain efficiency as well as fairness.
3.
Focus, through its 18 branches in prisons, on the improvement of prison conditions and of rehabilitation programs — reducing recidivism and improving employment and earning possibilities of previous offenders.
4.
Develop programs which will aid ex—offenders in obtaining employment.
—21—
PROPERTY OWNERSHIP
Property is a form of wealth. A distinguishing feature of the dual and unequal economy is the disproportionate concentration of property in the hands of a few. One form of property is housing. The ownership and location of housing is a determinant of access to jobs and therefore of net income — particularly with the increasing cost of transportation. Removing the barriers to black ownership of housing and other forms of wealth is important in the determination of long-term income since income arises from such investments. The operation of the dual but unequal economy makes investment in home ownership very difficult if not impossible for a disproportionate percentage of blacks.
The Annual Housing Survey (1975) shows that 44 percent of black households own their own homes compared to 67 percent of whites. Black homeownership is highest in the South (49 percent) compared to 39 percent in the remainder of the country. It is lowest in the Northeast (29 percent).
In the short run, homeownership by both blacks and whites is likely to be impeded by a number of factors, i.e., high price, low or declining rates of housing starts, high mortgage rates, discrimination both in housing and mortgage markets, low incomes of black families, and the lack of equity in present homes.
Clearly, there is the question of affordability, which increasingly affects all housing purchases. The price for homes is skyrocketing. The median price of a new home in March of 1980 was $63,000, and of existing homes was $59,000. There are, however, Increasing possibilities to buy condominiums at lower prices. Purchase of condominiums is one answer to the increasing cost of housing. A study by the National Association of Realtors shows that most young first—time buyers are turning toward less expensive types of housing. Those whose household incomes were $15,000 or less purchased condominium apartments in more than 45 percent of the new purchases reported. Those with incomes between $15,000 and $20,000 purchased apartment condos in almost 40 percent of the cases.
—22—
Between 1970—73 when affordability was less of an impediment, there were 3.1 million new homes constructed for families with incomes of $15,000 or less. Normally, 80 percent of all black families would have been eligible. Yet, black homeownership increased by only about 1 percent. During that period, approximately 42 percent of black families owned their own homes.
An important constraint on black homeownership is the lack of access to areas where affordable housing is increasing rapidly. This is particularly true of suburban and ex-urban areas where, as shown by a recent Department of Housing and Urban Development analysis, housing discrimination still exists in a multitude of forms. As a consequence, blacks occupy only 5 percent of the new single- family housing built since 1970. Another constraint is high mortgage rates, which, by all indications, we shall be living with for some time. It is as yet unknown how the new and creative mortgage and financing arrangements that are being developed in response to these high rates will affect blacks.
The inability to get mortgages is in part related to the level of and instability of earnings of blacks. Low earnings and high instability of employment as a consequence of the dual and unequal economy suggest a low permanent income and a high mortgage risk. In addition, since a 100 percent mortgage is not available, a major impediment blacks face is the lack of capital to make a down payment. One aspect of this problem is the inability of blacks to depend upon parents for assistance. This is Important because a study by the Family Housing Bureau of the Chicago Title Investment Company shows that nearly a third of new home buyers in 1979 got some assistance from parents. This clearly shows one of the links which perpetuates the dual and unequal economy.
The revitalization of cities will offer a substantial opportunity for homeownership by blacks. The task, of course, is to increase ownership prior to revitalization reaching an advanced stage when prices will be
—23—
out of range. Many of the conversions occur to housing structures which blacks rent but do not own. Currently, only 15 percent of central city homes are owned by blacks although blacks account for, on the average, 25 percent of central city residents. Given the rising operating costs, and the limited ability to pass these costs on to residents partly because of rent control, these conversions can be expected to continue although at a slower rate because of opposition from displaced rentors. The point is, however, that ownership of units within these structures offers an opportunity for increased black ownership. Ownership is an effective way of taking advantage of a governmental tax subsidy for the accumulation of wealth. Obviously, ownership is not a principal option for the poor.
While our long-range policy is to increase homeownership, we recognize that for many blacks renting will be the only mode of acquiring shelter. Low- income persons pay a very high percentage of their incomes in rental fees. Yet, it is estimated that only 10 percent of those eligible for housing assistance receive it. For low-income families in particular, rental assistance will be required.
Although applicable in only seven states, rent control is often said to contribute to the shortage of supply of rental units. Without rent control the subsequent rise in rents would deprive many blacks of shelter. Clearly, the already high proportion of income in low-income households going to rent cannot be significantly increased. The removal of rent control is not the answer for most blacks. Yet, its modification in specific cases should be considered.
To promote housing opportunities the NAACP will:
1.
Increase the knowledge of black middle income and working class households about the value of rural and urban home and land ownership — both as a consumer good and, particularly, as an investment.
2.
Increase the knowledge of black households about the existing
barriers to ownership, stressing alternative methods of financing.
—24—
3.
Participate in the development of policies to increase ownership of condominiums by blacks in those apartment buildings which are undergoing conversion.
4.
Continue to fight discrimination policies and practices in all phases of the housing market.
5.
Support public and private sector programs which improve and increase the rental housing opportunities for minorities. These include programs at the national and state and local levels.
6.
Support policies to maintain ownership of existing houses and land.
POLITICS
—25—
There is a strong interaction between the political system and the dual and unequal economy — an interaction that tends to support and perpetuate both. The political system implements social values and defines the environment in which the economy functions. Factors important to the functioning of the dual and unequal economy are determined politically. An essential objective of black political participation, therefore, is to influence elections and government policies at all levels. This participation may occur in a number of ways. But the most universal way of participating is voting.
In the presidential elections of 1972, 52 percent of blacks of voting age voted; 34 percent of voting age voted in the congressional election of 1974. While data are not available for state and local government participation, it is obvious that in a great number of localities blacks are of a sufficient number that they could make a difference in the outcome of an election by full participation in the electoral process.
Failure to participate in the electoral process is particularly acute among young blacks whose futures are being addressed by this economic program. Of the 18-24-year-olds, only about one- fourth voted in 1972. Yet, some of the worst maladies such as high unemployment and high arrest rates affect this group and are susceptible to political decisions. Hence, a concerted effort will have to be made to increase the voter participation rate of youth.
The politics of the 1980’s are likely to be affected by population shifts from the cities, where most blacks reside, to the suburbs, and to the South and West. The reapportionment of Congressional representation based on the 1980 Census will undoubtedly have an important affect on blacks.
To accomplish greater meaningful political participation, the NAACP will:
—26—
1.
Continue to conduct a rigorous program of voter registration.
2.
Conduct a vigorous program of voter education on economic issues.
3.
Continue to inform citizens on the voting records of their representatives .
4.
Intensify our efforts to increase the black turnout rate at elections on the state, local and federal levels.
5.
Analyze legislation, proposals, and programs at every stage of their development and implementation to ascertain their potential impact on the economic conditions of blacks.
6.
Monitor and suggest redistricting based on the 1980 Census so that black voting strength is not diluted.
7.
Encourage the use of citizen-initiated legislation to further the
objectives of blacks as outlined by the NAACP.
—27—
BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT
The lack of business ownership is another characteristic of the dual economy in which many blacks must function. While business ownership is an attractive form of wealth development, blacks have had only limited success in these ventures. There are over 230,000 black-owned firms in the United States compared to 14,600,000 white-owned firms. The gross receipts of black firms in 1977 was $8.6 billion compared to $4.1 trillion for white-owned firms. Most of these black firms are concentrated in such cities as Chicago, New York, Los Angeles, with about 68 percent in retail trade and services.
Studies have shown that the most troubling problems of minority firms are the lack of capital, limited managerial experience, and the lack of a wide and strong market for products. As a result, many minority firms fail and have not proven to be a significant source of black employment.
There is growing evidence that small firms, not necessarily minority firms, are the key generators of new employment in most central cities. Thus, there is a potentially useful role for viable small black firms. Hence the interest in small firms arises from an interest in minority entrepreneurship as well as in urban revitalization. This interest is also related to the belief that closing the income gap over the long run depends on the ownership and transmittal of capital over generations and increasing the influence of black employers.
The majority of minority firms are single proprietorships, and this in itself can be a limitation on capital as well as managerial inputs. It is, therefore, not wise to focus solely on single proprietorships. Indeed, the development of cooperatives and public-private partnerships as well as publicly- owned companies are highly desirable steps in black economic development.
The availability of capital concerns all firms. Small minority firms
lack retained earnings, and are unable to issue debt or equity instruments
—28—
to the public. In addition, minority entrepreneurs suffer from limited wealth and the greater possibility that they will be rejected for needed credit, in some cases because of discrimination.
It is probable that some changes in regulations, for example in capital gains taxation, or concerning the "prudent man" principle, could make more venture capital available; but this does not insure greater funds for minorities and would not resolve the managerial issue. One possibility for increasing available capital would be to permit commercial banks to take equity positions in small black firms. This would provide both the financial and management support that is needed. On the other hand, some tax credits for investment may be of minimal help since they are operable only if a profit is made. In those cases, they are useful.
A much broader concern is inflation. This increases the cost of credit to minority firms, Increases operating costs, and may cause losses to the extent that these costs cannot be passed on.
Accordingly, the NAACP will:
1.
Support policies to enlarge the domestic and foreign markets of existing minority owned firms; and encourage minority entry into new areas.
2.
Support policies to broaden capital availablity to the minority- owned firms. These include those policies aimed at broadening the availability of venture capital and credit in general.
3.
Support the investigation of abuse and the streamlining of programs aimed at advancing entrepreneurship. At present these programs are often prescriptions to failure.
4.
Support a stronger commitment to minority businesses by all levels of government and by the private sector.
5.
Increase the enrollment of young blacks in business, management and
—29—
related substantive fields where business opportunities are promising. Our objective is to stimulate the formation of a generation of highly competent business executives in non-trad- itional minority ventures.
6. Develop a program to induce private industry to devote a portion of their procurements to minority set-asides.
—30-.-§ INTERNATIONAL
The economies of the world are closely tied together. Hence, the operation of a dual economy in America and the ability of black Americans to close the economic gap is highly dependent upon international trade. Of particular interest is the vulnerability of the black labor force to the loss of jobs because of decisions, primarily by multinational corporations, to locate production activities abroad; decisions made by the economy as a whole to favor foreign- produced goods over those produced domestically; and because of immigration policies in the United States which permit relatively easy legal and illegal entry of foreign persons who eventually compete with domestic workers, often for entry-level jobs which are in short supply.
The economic vunerability of blacks also arises from their overrepresentation in those occupations and industries which are exposed to foreign competition. These are, for example, the steel, textile, and automobile industries, and many manual and non-professional services which are traditionally held by blacks.
While there have been disadvantages to blacks as a result of these developments, American consumers, including blacks, have benefited from some foreign Imports such as automobiles, cameras, and clothing. The opening of trade, therefore, brings both benefits and costs to the black community. The benefits are not solely on the consumer side. The creation of foreign production units in the United States, as has been the case in the automobile industry, provides jobs.
There is no clear evidence of what the net effect of foreign trade is on the income-earning power of blacks over the long-run; obviously a continuous net loss of jobs is not welcomed. Recognizing this, the NAACP will pursue the following:
1.
Support policies which make domestic production more competitive at home
and abroad.
—31—
2.
Support policies which require an analysis of the impact resulting from major shifts in production of labor-intensive activities from the U.S. to abroad. The objective is not to deprive firms of their right to make choices, but to permit the opportunities for adjustment by local communities, and to create the opportunity for labormanagement-government cooperation in reaching a satisfactory resolution when this is possible.
3.
Analyze government regulations and agreements for their impact on domestic as compared to foreign production and employment.
4.
Support immigration policies that match the immigrant labor supply to the demand, and which are consistent with the objectives of full employment at home.
—32—
POVERTY
There are substantial numbers of persons — black and white — to whom this long-range plan which emphasizes elimination of the dual and unequal economy and providing full employment through earned income would have limited applicability. These are the elderly, children, and adults who are poor especially by virtue of their inability to participate in employment at non-poverty . wages.
Among these are the over 40 percent of black children who live in poverty stricken homes, the 34 percent of black elderly over 65 years of age who are poor, and the 51 percent of black female-headed households who are poor, compared to the 11 percent of white children living in poverty, the 12 percent of white elderly, and the 24 percent of white female-headed households that are poor.
Poverty has a dynamic characteristic which will seriously affect future generations of blacks. Poor families transmit no wealth through inheritances, have limited means to support the educational, health, and cultural needs of their children, are unable to afford the ancilliary items which enhance experience, and so forth. All these factors eventually are reflected in the poor performance of disadvantaged children in school.
Hence, our fight against poverty aims not only to relieve the plight of the present generation, but to respond to the dynamic aspects of poverty which express themselves in future generations. That 40 percent of black children currently live in poverty is a bad omen for the future.
Obviously, for those blacks and whites who cannot work there needs to be income support. Studies have shown that such support does not constitute a disincentive to work among those of the poverty-stricken who can
work; and for many families, poverty is not a permanent status.
—33—
Among blacks, poverty is heaviest among female-headed households and in central cities. The incomes of these families will benefit less from the revitalization of cities or from economic growth which benefit mostly families with employable adults. Because of the relationship between poverty and family structure, the single-parent household has to be of concern to the black community.
Therefore, NAA.CP will:
1.
Support a minimum income for all families while maintaining adequate nutritional and health programs for poor children.
2.
Support greater administrative efficiency as a means of reducing cost.
3.
Support job and training programs for poor persons able to work — while recognizing that over 70 percent of those on welfare are children
and another sizable percentage are mothers with dependent children.
4.
Extend the two-parent family eligibility to all states as a means of preserving the two-parent family, which has a better chance
to escape poverty.
5.
Support policies to reduce family dissolution where minor children are involved.
6.
Promote programs for adequate child care for mothers who desire training or employment.
The policies stated above will help to relieve deprivation among black families. From a long-run perspective, however, nothing will serve the black community better than a concentration of effort and investment in the children of the poor. For these children, it is important that their futures be paved by a greater investment in their health, education, and general living environment.
This is the basis upon which their future incomes will rest.
—34—
THE KEYS TO THE FUTURE: MOBILITY AND INVESTMENT
Mobility and investment are the key concepts in this long-range plan to escape the devastating effects of the dual and unequal economy. The mobility of blacks to locations of economic growth and into occupations and industries which are expanding is imperative. Investment in education and real assets - especially housing - is also essential. Without mobility, even the most successful war against employment discrimination will have limited economic gains; for this would essentially make us equal in locations and positions of shrinking economic importance. Without mobility, economic growth, a key to economic progress, will either pass us by or create more structurally unemployed since growth through technological progress leads to a reduction in the demand for workers in those occupations in which blacks are concentrated. Without investment in ourselves, mobility is limited and wealth passed on to future generations of blacks is of limited real economic value. Consequently, this long-range economic policy statement goes beyond economic growth and employment discrimination.
We shall strive to escape the barriers of the dual and unequal system, and, simultaneously, we shall strive to remove those barriers for future generations of blacks.
30 -
Margaret Bush Wilson
Chairman, Board of Directors
Jesse H. Turner
T reasurer
NATIONAL OFFICERS
Dr. W. Montague Cobb
President
Alfred Baker Lewis
Treasurer Emeritus
Benjamin L. Hooks
Executive Director
Roy Wilkins
Executive Director Emeritus
Kelly M. Alexander, Sr.
Vice-Chairman, Board of Directors
Dr. Harry J. Greene
Assistant Treasurer
VICE PRESIDENTS
Dr. Broadus N. Butler Dr. William F. Gibson William H. Oliver
Max Delson, Esq. Dr. Lucien N. Holman Charles H. Smith
EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE
Kelly M. Alexander, Sr. Max Delson, Esq. James Kemp Dr. Eugene T. Reed Samuel Tucker, Esq.
Dr. Broadus N. Butler Emmitt J. Douglas John J. Mance Rev. Charles S. Smith Jesse H. Turner
Dr. W. Montague Cobb Mrs. Sarah M. Greene William H. Oliver Mrs. Irene H. Smith Margaret Bush Wilson
Ex-officio Theodore A. Jones William Pickens ill
DIRECTORS EMERITI
Mrs. Daisy L. Bates Hon. Theodore M. Berry Msgr. A. V. McLees Dr. Robert C. Weaver
BOARD OF DIRECTORS
Kelly M. Alexander, Sr. C. R. Darden Rev. Edward A. Hailes Ms. Darcel Moorefield Mrs. Irene H. Smith
Kelly M. Alexander, Jr. Calvin 0. Davis Ira Haupt II William H. Oliver Bishop William M. Smith
Ms. Sheila Anderson Keven J. Davis Herbert Henderson, Esq. William Pickens III James E. Stewart, Sr.
Ben F. Andrews Dr. Sylvester S. Davis, Jr. Dr. Aaron E. Henry Ms. Sandra Patton Rev. A. C. Sutton
Bernard J. Battle S. L. Deckard Dr. L. H. Holman William E. Pollard Hobart Taylor, Jr., Esq.
Hon. Julian Bond Max Delson, Esq. W. Gene Howell Dr. Maurice F. Rabb Odail Thoms
Mrs. Dorothy Burch Emmitt J. Douglas Dr. H. Claude Hudson Joseph L. Rauh, Jr., Esq. Ms. Jocelyn Travis
Dr. Broadus N. Butler Mrs. Louisa A. Fletcher Hon. Charles V. Johnson Dr. Eugene T. Reed Samuel W. Tucker, Esq.
Charles W. Cherry Douglas A. Fraser Theodore A. Jones Thomas Reed Jesse H. Turner, Sr.
Dt. W. Montague Cobb Dr. William F. Gibson James Kemp Dr. Evelyn H. Roberts Thomas Turner
Nathaniel S. Colley, Esq. Dr. Harry J. Greene John J. Mance Ms. Andrea Simmons Mrs. Margaret B. Wilson
Silas E. Craft Mrs. Sarah M. Greene Dr. J. J. McClendon Hon. Henry R. Smith, Jr. Dr. Philip Y. Wyatt
Gloster B. Current John H. Gwynn, Jr. Mrs. Enol la P. McMillan Tino M. Wyatt, Ex-Officio
NAACP SPECIAL CONTRIBUTION FUND
OFFICERS
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE
Seventeen Ninety Broadway New York, New York 10019 (212) 245-2100
Hobart Taylor, Jr.
V ice-Chairman
Hinton King
Assistant Secretary
Hon. Julian Bond
Dr. Leonard L. Burns
Mrs. Frances Murphy Campbell
Dr. W. Montague Cobb
Sol Chaikin
Earl B. Dickerson, Emeritus
Dr. W. Montague Cobb
Vice-Chairman
Margaret Bush Wilson
Chairman
Benjamin L. Hooks
Secretary
Jesse H. Turner, Sr.
Treasurer
William H. Oliver
Assistant Treasurer
Thomas I. Atkins
General Counsel
Hon. Samuel R. Pierce, Jr. Jesse H. Turner, Sr.
Harvey C. Russell Abraham Venable
Ramon Scruggs Roy Wilkins, Emeritus
Mrs. Maxine Smith Herm Wille
Hobart Taylor, Jr. Margaret Bush Wilson
Hon. C. De Lores Tucker Michael Russell Winston
BOARD OF TRUSTEES
Albert Dunmore Samuel Jackson
Dr. Benjamin Grant Theodore Jones
Lucius P. Gregg, Jr. Dr. Marguerite Barnett King
Lester H. Grubman Alfred Baker Lewis
Ira Haupt II Samuel Miller
Dr. Benjamin L. Hooks Randall C. Morgan, Sr.
William H. Oliver
LAS VEGAS
CERTIFICATE OF MERIT
ISSUED TO
President
Treasurer
Dated at Las Vegas, Nevada, thi
26th day of February, 1960
In grateful recognition of service rendered to the National Association for the
Advancement of Colored People.
'Anne" r. L. Simmons, Director
A DWAY NEW YORK, N. Y. 1001 (212) 245-2100
EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
EDUCATION DEPARTMENT
FEATURES
at the
68th ANNUAL NATIONAL CONVENTION
June 27 — July 1,1977
ST. LOUIS GATEWAY CONVENTION & EXHIBIBON CENTER
ST. LOUIS, MISSOURI
an Education Department Publication
NATIONAL'ASSOCIATION FO« THE ADVANCE**^1 °* COIOWD PEOPLE
, LEADERSHIP DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE
DIPLOMA^
Lillian R. Littleton
Skills Development
Washington, D. C.
* COMMUNITY MINI-tLE ADE RSHII^ DEVELOPMENT INSTITUTE
}.t TUESDAY, JUNE 28. 1977
2:30 - 5:00 p.m.
lets Bet
Baek/
WHlVT HAPPENS M an Institute:
to Basics
The INSTITUTE hi iIps you to develop and sharpen leadership skills through ACTUAL PARTICIPATOR
obtained through participation are adaptable to the job, the church, the community and the home.
The 1Q77 Institut jis th<$ Barbara Schindler Jones Institute and will focus on VALUES CLARIFICATION and
tfadfrsRip- DEVELOITME DOMINANCE. We are fortunate to have Dr. Jones as instructor for both institute
sessions.’ She has received the highest evaluations of any of the Institute’s guest instructors. Additionally she designe
and conducted the staff training fo: the NAACP's Training Department staff for a three year period.
M - K MmM
''VALUES CLARIFICATION''
PARTICIPATE in a VALUES CLARIFICATION session designed to
help you weigh alternative modes of thinking and acting; examine your values,
ideals and goals as they relate to social change.
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Barbara Schindler Jones
Boulder, Colorado
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29. 1977
10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
"LEADERSHIP: DEVELOPMENT NOT DOMINANCE"
This session will focus on SHARED leadership. Learn how NAACP branches can effectively counteract the problem
of leadership turnover by the application of management skills to a constantly changing scene.
INSTRUCTOR: Dr. Barbara Schindler Jones
Boulder, Colorado
INSTITUTE COORDINATOR: Ms Edie Hollis, Detroit, Michigan
EDUCATION WORKSHOPS AT THE 68TH ANNUAL NATIONAL CONVENTION
Education workshops at the 68th Annual National Convention are scheduled for TUESDAY, JUNE 28 and WEDNESDAY,
JUNE 29 in ROOM 274 of the St. Louis Convention and Exhibition Center.
TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 1977
** 10:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.
The TUESDAY morning session, THE SCHOOL COUNSELOR: HELP OR HINDRANCE?", will focus on the role of
the counselor in guidance, counseling students in career development; what students should expect from counselors; the role
of parents and students; scholarship sources and how the school counselor can effectively assist students in reaching their
potential.
Moderator: Mrs. Bettye Black Kellar, Education Field Director, NAACP
Panelists: Mrs. Thelma C. Lennon, Director
Division of Pupil Personnel Services
Department of Public Instruction
State of North Carolina
Dr. Queen D. Fowler, Counselor
Adult Counseling Service
School of Continuing Education
Washington University
St. Louis, Missouri
Dr. Samuel H. Johnson, Director
Scholarship Services and Fund for Negro Students
Atlanta, Georgia
Dr. Katherine W. Cole, Associate Professor
Guidance and Counseling
Bowie State College, Maryland
Dr. Joyce B. Washington, Counselor
College Student Personnel Administration
University of Northern Colorado
Greeley, Colorado
Staff Coordinator: Ms Edna Carey
Detroit, Michigan
♦Both Institute Sessions will be held in Room 264 of the Convention Center
♦♦This session will be held in Room 274 of the Convention Center
TUESDAY, JUNE 28, 1977
4:30 - 6:00 p.m.
♦SPECIAL SESSION
A SPECIAL feature of this year’s convention is a JOINT EDUCATION AND LEGAL WORKSHOP on "ISSUES AND
ANSWERS: EDUCATION AND LEGAL PROBLEMS IN SCHOOL DESEGREGATION" designed to clarify recent developments
in the law and to suggest solutions to problems encountered in school desegregation.
Moderator: Althea T. L. Simmons, Director for Education Programs, NAACP
Panelists: Nathaniel R. Jones
General Counsel, NAACP
Mr. E. Lutrell Bing
Assistant Superintendent for Supportive Services
Hillsborough County School District
Tampa, Florida
Dr. Thomas K. Minter, Deputy Commissioner
Bureau of Elementary and Secondary Education
U.S. Office of Education
Washington, D. C.
Dr. Robert L. Green, Dean
College of Urban Development
Michigan State University
East Lansing, Michigan
WEDNESDAY, JUNE 29, 1977
♦* 2:30 - 5:00 p.m.
The WEDNESDAY session on "QUALITY EDUCATION AND SCHOOL DESEGREGATION" is an outgrowth of the
NAACP's Invitational Work Conference on quality education in May and will focus on what constitutes a quality education
the role of the student, parents and school administrators; strategies for community action in improving the quality of
education in the schools.
William H. Hardy
Executive Secretary
Chicago Southside, Illinois, NAACP
Althea T. L. Simmons
Director for Education Programs, NAACP
Dr. Joshua L. Smith, Dean
The School of Education
The City College of New York
New York, New York
Dr. Robert Marion, Assistant Professor
& Undergraduate Advisor
Department of Special Education
The University of Texas
Austin, Texas
♦ This session will be held in Room 276 of the Convention
*♦ This session will be held in Room 274 of the Convention
Dr. James Coleman
Associate Superintendent for Community Development
Jefferson County School District
Louisville, Kentucky
Dr. William Brazziel
Professor of Higher Education
The University of Connecticut
Storrs, Connecticut
Staff Coordinator: Mrs. Edna Carey
Center Detroit, Michigan
Center
Moderator:
Overview:
Panel
WEDNESDAY. JUNE 29, 1977 (cont'd)
2:30 - 5:00 p.m.
Panelists: Dr. James Coleman
Associate Superintendent for Community Development
Jefferson County School District
Louisville, Kentucky
Dr, William Brazziel, Professor of Higher Education
The University of Connecticut
Storrs, Connecticut
Staff Coordinator: Ms Edna Carey
Detroit, Michigan
**********
THE BRANCH PROBLEM CLINIC
NEED HELP IN SOLVING A PROBLEM Hi YOUR BRANCH H Visit the BRANCH PROBLEM CLINIC during the
Convention and discuss branch problems on a ONE-TO-ONE basis with consultants and staff 4:30 - 6:00 p.m, TUESDAY
and WEDNESDAY, June 28 and 29 in ROOM 115 in the Gateway Center. Consultants will be available for the following
program/problem areas:
• Armed Services
. Branch Administration
. Church Work
. Life Membership
. Legislation
. Membership
. Community Coordination ■ Political Action
. Consumer Education! . Press and Publicity
Education, North and West
Education, South
ESA A Programs
. Problems of the Aging
. Suspensions & Expulsions
. Title I Programs
, Fundraising
W Housing
. Title VI Complaints
. Veterans Affairs
. Economic Development
Legal Redress Black Contractors
. Labor and Industry Clinic Coordinator: Mr. Philip Littlejohn
Bronx, New York
Room 250
Convention Center
Coordinator: Ms Leona Stallworth
Detroit, Michigan
OPERATION EDUCATION BOOK STOP!
STOP and BROWSE at our departmental
OPERATION EDUCATION BOOK STOP.
Take a look at books by and about Blacks.
Coordinators: Ms Alberta Mitchell
Ms Fannie Williams
Detroit, Michigan
National Association for
the Advancement of Colored People
OFFICIAL SOUVENIR JOURNAL
Presents Its Annual
" Freedom Fund Banquet'86 "
THEME:
"A SALUTE TO OUR YOUTH"
Sunday, October 12, 1986 at 6:00 PM
Refreshments and Dinner
Bally's
Las Vegas, Nevada
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE
LAS VEGAS BRANCH
P.O. BOX 4887 • LAS VEGAS, NEVADA 89127 • (702)646-1662
THE
PRESIDENTS MESSAGE
What does the NAACP mean to you?
National Association for the Advancement of Colored People. The
NAACP means everything to me. It is an idea that holds out hope for
black people, the unfulfilled promise of the American dream. The
Association has withstood and survived the onslaughts of eradication of
racial bigots, the likes of which we hope to never see again, such as the
Bilbos, Eastlauds, Tahmages, Wallaces, Klans and White Citizens
Councils, who were very visible in the 30's, 40's, 50's and 60 s. And
now in the 70’s and 80's it’s a new ball game of invisible bigots who are
too numerous to name. They smile beautifully when they greet you with a
prominently displayed sign that reads, "Equal Employment Opportunity
Employer" a declaration which of times is not supported by workforce
composition and upward mobility statistics. Therefore, as a black man I
appreciate the opportunity to have a job, home, automobile; voting, travel,
and education rights; and even to have dinner in this hotel. The NAACP
fought and won these rights and freedoms for me in the courts of this
country. I know that there is no way to place a value or price of these
opportunities and freedoms, that is why I am proud to be numbered
among those who make an annual tax deductible donation of $100.00 to
the NAACP.
THE STATE OF NEVADA
RICHARD H. BRYAN
Governor
EXECUTIVE CHAMBER
Carson Qty.'Nevada 89710
October 1986
TELEPHONE
(702) 885-5670
Mr. Jesse D. Scott
President
Las Vegas Branch
National Association for the Advancement
of Colored People
P.O. Box 4887
Las Vegas, Nevada 89127
Dear Jesse Scott:
It^my pleasure to send greetings to the National Association
for the Advancement of Colored People on its annual Life Membership
Recognition and Freedom Fund Banquet '86.
As the oldest civil rights organization W the United States, the
NAACP enjoys the respect of alM Americans for the countless
contributions it has made to the nation.
Over the years. Bonnie and I have participated in many NAACP
projects, and we continue to support its goals.
I send my warmest appreciation to the Las Vegas Branch the
NAACP for the important work it has done, and for the great strides
H will make W the future. Best wishes for a most successful Life
Membership Recognition and Freedom Fund Banquet.
BENJAMIN L HOOKS
Executive Director
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE
4805 MX. HOPE DRIVE-BALTIMORE, MARYLAND 21215 • (301)358-8900
GREETINGS!
It is with great pleasure that I send cordial greetings and felicitations to^ members
of the Las Vegas Branch NAACP on the occasion of the Branch's Freedom F« Banquet
86", featuring Mr. Joseph Madison as its speaker.
The Las Vegas Branch has earned great admiration for its achievements in the
struggle for WWW justice. I applaud its stalward efforts to maintain a constant vigil over
the civil and human rights promised by the Constitution and guaranteed by an informed
and active citizenry. The Branch's activities continue a long tradition of the NAACP
contributing towards the fulfillment of our mission - obtaining and keeping equal
opportunity for all Americans.
As we NAACPers have led the struggle to end discrimination in America, we are
rallying against the evil system of apartheid and its attendant racial violence M South
Africa. You of the Las Vegas Branch make your voices heard on issues in education,
housing, employment, crime and international relations. Never have you shirked your
responsibility to address the hard questions about the survival of the black family,
political action and economic activism. As a result, when leadership speaks
everyone listens.
am confident that with your help, the actions that we take this year will
represent a step toward achieving progress for blacks and other minorities.
Best wishes for a very enjoyable evening.
Benjamin L. Hooks
Executive Director
Sincerely,
Why Re-Invent The Wheel?
Consider the priceless reservoir of knowledge coupled with an inexhaustable
bank of experience and there you have the National
Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP) the largest
most effective, most feared and, respected Civil Rights Organization
world.
Then why organize another committee group or organizaion when
you already have one that has been tried and tested? The NAACP
presents to you a record W accomplishments for Blacks and Minority
people during the dark day of degregation in America for a period ®f
almost seventy-eight years.
The following is a partial Associations Accomplishments:
The enactment of legislation to make lynching illegal, minimum wage,
Social Security, Equal Opportunity, Fair Housing, Public
Accommodations, Small Business Administration, Voting Act, and
Exective Order UD246. In the Courts the NAACP has . won almost 50
landmarked cases before Supreme Court inciting Brown
Board of Education Topeka, Kansas.
If your needs are in any of the following areas then you
should come and join the NAACP. Such as:
ARMED SERVICES AND VETERANS AFFAIRS
COMMUNICATION, EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT, YOUTH WORK
CONSUMER EDUCATION AND THE PRISON AND OUT OF PRISON
PROBLEMS
Criteria For The Recipitants of
NAACP Awards
1986
All recipitants must demonstrate exceptional
leadership quality and be good role models for
others to follow. Through their humanitarian acts
they evidenced, nobility in their Concern
Commitment, and Compassion for improving the
human condition.
Committee Chairpersons
Mrs. Juanita Simmons - Banquet Chairperson
Mrs. Virginia Fountain - Tickets
Miss Hermanell Moody - Souvenir Journal
Mr. Jimmy Gay - Awards
Mr. Lee White - Youth
Dr. Bernard Hamilton - Act/so
NAACP
Awards 1986
Roy Wilkins: Distinguished Service Award
- Recipitants-
5' -
'' ; ' V"
''bi
Martin Luther King Jr. Distinguished Sendee Award
- Receipitant-
Outstanding Community Service Award
-Recipitant-
Iuj V dp"
business and Economic Development Award
-RecipitantCREDITS
For those who worked diligently to make this Banquet a Success.
Mrs. Juanita Simmons
Mrs. "Gerry" Geraldine Leigh
Larry's Sight and Sound
Mrs. Gwen White
Mr.Roosevelt Toston
Mr. James Tyree
Mrs. Sarann Knight Preddy
Mr. John Edmond
Ms. Donnette L. Harding
Mrs. Leola R. Fountain
Mrs. Margarete Knuckles
Mr. Jewel Scott
Nevada Black Chamber
Las Vegas Convention Center
Rev. Walter Pinkney
Ray & Ross Transport Co.
Throwers Market
Mr. Jimmy Gay HUM
Mrs. Sylvia Harris
Mr. Tyrone Tyler
Mr. Thomas Leigh
Mrs. Brenda Davis
Nucleus Plaza Center
Rev. J.E. Richardson Jr.
Economic Opportunity Board
Booker Burney
Mrs. Grace McGIothem
Ms. Carrie McClaim
Paula Johnson
Second Baptist Church
500 West Madison Ave.
Las Vegas, Nevada 89106
We are praying for your
continued Success in the
Struggle for Freedom and Justice
Reverend Willie Davis, Pastor
Bro. James Robinson
Chairman Deacon Board
Bro. Jewell Scott
Chairman Trustee Board
October 1986
Mr. Jesse D. Scott, President
Las Vegas NAACP
P.O. Box 4887
Las Vegas, NV 89127
Dear Co-workers:
The West Coast Region proudly salutes the Las Vegas Branch
NAACP.
Over the years this branch has continued the fight against
racism and discrimination,
we look back at conditions
remains a great deal to be
While .there is progress when
of yesteryears, there still
done.
Congratulations and best wishes for success.
Regional Director
EDUCATION:
Washington University, Bachelor of Arts and Science degree. He also studied at Wisconsin State
University, University Dayton and Wayne State University.
CAREER HIGHLIGHTS:
At the age of 24 Joe Madison was already the outspoken and energetic leader of the Detroit
Chapter of the NAACP, the nation's largest. He produced a telethon raising $100,000 for the
NAACP Port Gibson, Mississippi lawsuit. Former National Director of the NAACP Voter Education
Department, Joe Madison knows how to get people moving, working, and participating.
He has organized voter registration programs since 1978. With the establishment of a grass root
political network in congressional districts throughout the country, he has reached his yearly
goals of new voters each year. As Leader of three Overground Railroad/Bury Voter Apathy Marches,
Madison and hundreds of volunteers walked 1,000 miles through 11 states and registered over
100,000 voters, and just recently he completed the longest civil rights march in history, covering
16 states and 37 cities; he introduced a voter registration Prison Program; initiated legislation
empowering high school principals to present voter registration cards at graduation ceremonies.
Even pop superstar, Michael Jackson, joined Joe Madison in his efforts, registering young people
to vote during the 1984 Jackson Victory Tour.
In addition to his responsibilities at the NAACP, Madison is also a provocative News/Talk Host
with his own four-hour weekend radio program (WXYT-AM 1270). He has appeared on Good
Morning America, ABC News Nightline, Tony Brown's Journal, America's Black Forum, NBC's
Today, and a host of other programs.
HONORS:
NAACP Life Member; Recognized by Ebony Magazine as one of the nation's 50 Leaders of the
Future; Notable Americans; Outstanding Young Men of America; Man of Excellence Award,
presented by the Black Women's Hall of Fame Foundation; Black America's Who's Who.
PERSONAL:
Joseph E. Madison and family reside in Detroit, Michigan. A member of Greater New Mount
Moriah Baptist Church. He is currently the Political Director for the Service Employees International
Union.
JOSEPH E.
MADISON
1000 No. Highland
PAID ADVERTISEMENT
listen to “£The VPorb of Qob”
TE^ery Sunbay Morning 6:30 a.m.
KC'EPRabio 88.1 FM Vial
Minister Jesse D. Scott
For the Best in
Hair and Facial Grooming
Hair Unlimited
Harry Reid is dedicated
to the well being of the
residences of Nevada.
His years of service
prove his concern for
people. We need his
leadership.
My Committment has always been
for the people of Nevada.
Harry Reid
Harry
Reid U.S. SENATE
For a Strong Nevada!
F
Best Wishes and Much Success
Cosmetique Inc.
2433 Statz Street • North Las Vegas, NV 89030
Without the N.A.A.C.P.,
Black America would be lost I
THANKS TO THE MANY
BEAUTIFUL PEOPLE WHO HAVE
HELPED MAKE THE N A A C P
ASSEMBLYMAN
Gene Collins
Las Vegas Branch N.A.A.C.P.
“Freedom Fund Banquet ’86"
Presentation of Colors.....................Nellis Air Force Base
Programme
Theme: “A Salute To Our Youth’!
Master of Ceremonies
Minister Jesse D. Scott
President of the Las Vegas Branch of the NAACP and Radio Minister of “The Word of God”
Invocation........................................................Bishop E.N. Webb
State Bishop of Nevada Pastor, Pentacostal Temple Church of God in Christ , Las Vegas, Nevada
National Athem...................................................Audience
Lift Every Voice and Sing
Soloist.........................Mr. Anthony Thomas accompaning Ms. Susan Wolf
Music Calvin Shields All Star Band
Introduction of the Head TableBranch Assistant Secretary Miss Hemanell Moody
Dinner' — Music
GreetingsMrs. Verna Causon, Regional Director NAACP
Remarks of Encouragement to our YouthGovernor of Nevada Richard Bryan
Attorney General of Nevada Brian McKay
Youth StandingMr. Lee White & Dr. Bernard Hamilton
Introduction of SpeakerMr. Ron Martin
Prepresentative of the Phillip Randolph Instutute and the AFL/CIO
Speaker:............Mr. Joseph E. Madison
Member of the National Board NAACP; Former National Director Voter Education NAACP; Political Director Service Employees International Union AFL/CIO Washington, D C.
Recognition of Personalities and Politicians
Presentation of Awards 1986
Recognition of Executive and Banquet Committee
Song “We Shall Overcome”Audience
BenedictionRev. Wille Davis, Pastor, Second Baptist Church
PhotosMorgan’s Photographic Studio
100
Dr. Angela Clarke Pastors Conference of Southern Nevada Attorney James O. Porter II Les Ferrims Dooze Fordyce Club
Thomas & Leigh
Southwest Gas Company Mr. William O. Hogue Mr. Larry Wilburn Mr^Phyllis Scott Mr. Jewel Scott MGM Grand Hotel
Dr. Thomas Beck III
Greater New Jerusalem Baptist Church '
Mr. Booker Burney
Cosmotiques
Dr. James Pughsley
Mr. Aaron Williams
Telephone Company
A. Hogue
Mr. Jame$ L. Scott
Mr. William Evans
Mrs.
Mr. Mchard Blue
Mayor
First Interstate Bank
Station Casino
Nevada State Bank
Poor Together
rider Claude Parson
Mr. Cranford CiWford Miss Ruth Eppenger Mrs. Jackie Phillips Congressman Harry Reid Nevada Power Mr. Odell Mr. Jerry Lockhart re Co.
kREECO
Mr. Roosevelt Toston
Attorney Dave Reverend Mack Rainey M i n i ste
O'Neal
Mr. & Mrs.
re nd a
Narver
MENU
String Beans Amandine
Tossed Field Greens w/ Vinaigrette Dressing
Fresh Baked Rolls & Butter
Cheese Cake
Coffee, Tea, Sanka or Milk
Fruit Punch (for reception)
Roast Prime Rib of Beef au jus w/ Creamy Horseradish
Baked Idaho Potato w/ Sour Cream & Chives on Table
TRANSPORT INC.
MlOWLDWla,
{ ■ ..
300 WEST OWENS AVENUE i,sJa? lAS VEGAS, NV 89106
We Are Proud To Support
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Freedom Fund Banquet
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Transporting People is our Business
THINK WHAT SHE CAN
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ELECT PATTY CAFFERATA GOVERNOR
Paid For By Friends of
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ELECT RATTY
CAFFERATA
PATTY CAFFERATA: A PROVEN LEADER FOR TOMORROW
In four years as State Treasurer, Patty Cafferata has earned nearly
$100 million dollars by wisely investing our tax dollars. She’s kept out
treasury safe and she’s kept our money invested in Nevada banks whereH
can be used for local jobs, loans and construction.
Patty Cafferate will be the
Governor for Nevada’s future. She
understands that State government
is the largest business in
Nevada and she’s prepared to
take charge on behalf of all the
people she’ll represent.
Larry Wilburn’s
CENTER
Records
Color TV
Tapes
Stereo
Tape Decks
Speakers
Needles
Parts, Accessories
811 W. Owens Las Vegas, Nevada
Phone 648-4444
THE NEVADA EQUAL RIGHTS
COMMISSION OFFERS
PROTECTION TO ALL RESIDENTS
The Civil Rights Act of 1965 and Nevada Revised
Statues prohibit discrimination because of
Race, Color, Sex, Age, Religion, National Origin,
Physical or Visual or Aural Handicap
Our purpose is to enforce State laws covering:
Equal Employment Opportunities
Public Accommodations
Fair Housing
Main Office:
1515 East Tropicana, Suite 590
Las Vegas
Telephone 386-5304
Branch Office:
668 Galletti Way
Sparks
Telephone 789-0288
Office Hours: 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.
Monday through Friday
Abbott
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206 No.^t Street Las Vegas, NV 89101
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" Freedom Fund Banquet '86 "
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ATTORNEY AT LAW
STEWART L. BELL, CHSa£jf
601 East Bridger Avenue
NEVADA 89101
TELEPHONE
(702) 382-51 1 1
‘Best Wishes
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438-9124
P.O. Box 4313 Las Vegas, NV 89106
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630 SOUTH SEVENTH STREET 7Q2-3B&-&DO4
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702/386-5748
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Distribution of “Joe Cool” sponsored by The Dial Corporation
JOE COOL
Joe Cool could do it all,
No matter what size, shape, or color of ^ ball.
Everybody looked up to him since he had it made,
The Athletic Director even took care of his grades.
With Joe’s talent and blazing speed,
Just being an athlete met all of his needs.
On the football field, he did excel,
Trying to tackle Joe was like putting out a fire in Hel.
On the basketball court, he was even more divine.
Averaged 30 points a game, and could dunk anytime.
Fans from miles around would pack the place,
To see Joe score, and yell, “In your face.
From all over America, scholarships came,
All Joe thought he had to do was sign his name.
But little did he know his career had ended.
His grades were too low from classes unattended.
When the word got around about Joe Cool s grades,
Visiting coaches disappeared while scholarship
offers began to fade. ... t
Football........ basketball......... Joe had tons of spee ,
Nobody even bothered to see if Joe could read.
When last seen, Joe had lost all hope,
Hanging around the park, shooting up dope.
The city will never forget super Joe Cool,
Who put sports before books and wound up
......... a fool.
by Elmon W. Frier
Copyrightr 1981
Ten V/aysTq Kill YourClub
1. Don’t Come To The Meetings.
2. But If You Come Come Late.
3. If The Weather Does NotSuit You,
Don't Come. At All.
4. If You Ever Attend A Meeting Find Fault
With The Work Of The Officers.
5. Never Accept Ahy Office Because It Is
Easier ToCriticize Than To Do THINGS.
6. Nevertheless, Always Get Sore If You Are Not
Appointed On A Committee But If You Are
Appointed Don’t AttensAWCommittee Meeti&S.
7. IfYouAreAskedByTheChaikmaN To6/PE Av
Opinion Regardin some Important Matter
Tell Him Tn at You Have Noth ins To SaY After
The Meetins Tell Everyone Now Thingsmdvis)
Have Been Done.
8. Do Nothing More Than Is Absolutely
Necessary Rut When Others Roll UpTheir Sleeves
Ano Do It All, Then Howl About How TreClub
Is Run By A Clique.
4. Hold Back. Cn Your Dues AsLons As Possible. 1
Even Do Better, Don't fhv Then! At All-
10. Don’t Even Bother About Brine ing In New
Members. *Let George Do It".
I
eastern airlines
FOR
COMFORT, COURTESY
AND
ON TIME TRAVEL
FLY
Lift Every Voice and Sing
(J. Rosamond Johnson)
Lift every voice and sing
Till earth and heaven ring.
Ring,with the harmonies of Liberty;
Let our rejoicing rise
High as the list’ning skies.
Let it resound loud as the rolling seas;
Sing a song full of the faith that the past hHtaught us.
Sing a song fW of the hope that the present has brought us; M
Facing the rising sun
OfMur new day begun.
Let us march on tilkyictory is won.
Stony the road we trod
Bitter the chast’ning rod
Belt in the days when hope unborn had died;
Yet with a steady beat.
Have not dur weary feet
Come to the place for which pur fathers sighed.
We have come over a way that with tears has been watered.
We have come, treading our path thro’ the bipod of the slaughtered.
Out of the gloomy past.
Till now we stand at last
Where the white gleam of our bright star is cast.
God of our weary years,
God of our silent tears.
Thou who has brought us thus far on the
Thou' who hast by Thy might.
Led us into the light.
Keep jus forever in the path, we pray.,
Lest our where w«|met Thee,
Lest, our hearts drunk wjtM«wipAof . we forget ThczDW
Shadowed beneath Thy Land,
May we forever stand.
True to our God. true to our Native,Land.
James Welclon Johnson
Congratulations
and
Best Wishes
BALLYS LAS VEGAS. NEVADA
(Jeu*/*.

ME
LAS VEGAS NAACP
Gala Celebration
and Awards Banquet
Saturday, July 14,1979 ★ 7:30 p.m.
Aladdin Hotel ★ Las Vegas, Nevada
No Host Cocktails 6:30 P-ESeJ! Dinner 7:30 p.m.
IMPERIAL BALLROOM ' ALADDlN’JiUTEL
DINNER MENU
Pineapple Hawaiian
Tossed Green Salad .1
Roast Prime Rib of Blue- Ribbon'Beefs auMus . • - . ■ -
Stuffed . Baked Potato^ ... > '.Broccoli Mornay *
Menthe Parfai t ,"7/■
★★w*******************************^^*^***^^^^*^^^**^^*
Banquet Committee: f ------
Mrs. VeMia Wice W-iOGhairman -J- - <*
Mrs. Ida M. Crockett Mr. Bob Bailey
MrHlames Tyree - - Sarann knight
Mrs. Virgie Fitzgerald Mr. Cranford-Crawford
MrBimmy .Gay. ' - Ms'. Sherri Zanders
BANQUET
***PR0GRAM***
PresiWhg Mr. Bob Bailey
Music Ms. Grace McGlothen
Invocation Rev. Marion Bennett, Pastor
Zion Methodist H®sh
Mr. Anthony Th'onMs
Greeti ngs MrM Sarann' jragfiil^ls^^ice President
Las Vegas Branch, NAACP
Remarks and Introduction of Guests
Scholarships Presentation®^
Remarks/Acknowl edgement's
Dinner
Music Ms. Bronica[Ilay
^chpla^mp' Recipient
Introduction of Speaker Dr. J. B. McMillan
President, CasMegas BraMfi, NAACP
Speaker Rev.
Executive Doctor, NAACP
Remarks/. Margaret BusMNilMn
Chairman, Nat'l Board NAACP
Music Mr. Anthony Thomas
Presidential Award Dr. J. B. McMillan
Presentation to NAACP < Phi Delta
Alpha Rho Chapter
mO Davis and
Knfgtit
Benediction Father Hunt Pardons
NAACP SCHOLARSHIP RECIPIENTS
TOP HONORS AWARDEES
Bronfca Clay, Chaparral High School
Greg McCurdy
Las Vegas High School
ACADEMIC EXCELLENCE AWARDEES
Marste Smith Chaparral High School
Gary RooTwon '
Clark High School
Danae Adams
Baste High School .
Hall
Eldorado High‘School
Mar-la Chandler
Vo-Tech
Shelia McClellon Chaparral High School
Jacqueline Jones
Clark High School
John Matthews
Western 'High School
Sherion Wilson
Bonanza High School
Crystale Cowens
Rancho High School
Bridget Hughes Gorman High,School
LAS VEGAS BRANCH N. A. A. G. P. HISTORICAL C<MMITTEE Organized: January 5, 1975 . L Organizational Meeting Held at the Home Of « Mr. and Mrs* J* David Hoggard, Sr.
Steering Committee:
CO-CHAIRMAN:
Virgia Fitzgerald (Mrs. H. P. ) Sarann Knight
Deborah Moore (Mrs. Henry)
648 5677
648 5256
878 8233
PROCUREMENT
GROUPS:
Life Members
: Mrs. Lubertha Johnson
736 1216
Youth:
Edith Abington (Mrs. 0. N«)
642 4540
Catalogue:
Grace McGlothen
642 8609
Inez McClish (Mrs. James D.)
739 6189
Thelma Tyree (Mrs« James W»)
734 0937
Hazel Gay (Mrs. James A.)
648 7768
Lois Ice (Mrs. Garnet)
648 8881
Composition:
Henry Moore, Chairman
878 8233
James A.(Jimmy) Gay,III
648 7768
H. P. Fitzgerald
648 5677
Woodrow Wilson
642 1118
Clarence Ray
648 0282
Joe Freddy
648 5256
James W. Tyree
734 0937
0. N« Abington
642 45S0
James D. McClish
739 6189
J. David Hoggard, Sr.
648 LSS6-
Credit Union
: Sarann Knight
648 5256
Nora Wilson (Mrs. Woodrow)
642 1118
Secretary:
Thelma Ray (Mrs. Clarence)
648 0282
Gwen Weekes Rahner (Mrs* Harry) 458 3444 Mabel Hoggard (Mrs. J. David) -Organizer 648 9040 Carrie B. Stewart 648 4386
LAS VEGAS BRANCH N.A.A.C.P. HISTORICAL COMMITTEE Organized - January 5, 1975 Organizational Meeting Held at the home of
Mr. and Mrs. J. David Hoggard, Sr.
CO-CHAIRMAN:
Virgia Fitzgerald (Mrs. H.P.) Sarann Knight
Deborah Moore (Mrs. Henry)
648-5677
648-5256
878-8233
PROCUREMENT GROUPS:
Life Members:
Mrs. Lubertha Johnson
736-1216
Youth:
Edith Abington (Mrs. O.N.)
Grace McGlothen
Inez McClish (Mrs. James D.) Thelma Tyree (Mrs. James W.) Hazel Gay (Mrs. James A.) Lois Ice (Mrs. Garnet)
Henry Moore, Chairman
James A. (Jimmy) Gay, III
H.P. Fitzgerald
Woodrow Wilson
Clarence Ray
Joe Preddy
James W. Tyree
O.N. Abington
James D. McClish
J. David Hoggard, Sr.
642-4540
642-8609 739-6189 734-0937 648-7768
648-8881
878-8233 648-7768 648-5677 642-1118 648-0282 648-5256 734-0937 642-4540 739-6189 648-9040
Credit Union:
Secretary:
Sarann Knight Nora Wilson (Mrs. Woodrow)
Thelma Ray (Mrs. Clarence)
648-5256
642-1118
648-0282
Steering Committee:
Gwen Weeices Rahner (Mrs. Harry)
Mabel Hoggard (Mrs. J. David) - Organizer Carrie B. Stewart
458-3444
648-9040
648-4386
NOTICE:
The next meeting will be held at the N.A.A.C.P. Office, 1040 West Owens, on Thursday, January 30, 1975, at 7:30 p.m.
711 Morgan Avenue LasVegas, Nevada. March 22,1961
Dr*James B.McMillan, Chairman
Executive Board
LasVegas Branch,NAACP
LasVegas,Nevada
Dear Dr .McMillan:
I herewith tender my resignation as a member of the Executive Board of the LasVegas Branch, NAACP*
It has been a great pleasure working with the other members of the Executive Board, and U am extremely proud of the work which we have accomplished together*
I shall continue,in an unofficial capacity,to support the program and policies of NAACP to the best of my ability*
Respectfully yours,
Mabel W.Hoggard
September 12, 1968
PERSONAL I
Major General Edward H. Nigro, USAF (Ret) Deputy Chief Executive, Hughes - Nevada Operations The Lands
Las Vegas, Nevada 89109
Dear Major General Nigro:
This letter is being written to Inform you that we have had a conference with Justice John Mowbray and were very pleased to learn that you have consented to talk with us about our NAACP Special Contribution Fund.
I phoned your office and in your absence talked to Mr. Freeman. I wanted to arrange a time that would be mutually convenient so that I could arrange to come to Las Vegas to meet with you. I explained that my schedule will take me to the Northwest for an engagement during the next two weeks and that I will be free on September 26-27. Mr. Freeman informed me that you will be in New York at that time.
Therefore, I am writing to inquire if you will be free on September 30th or October 1st which are two very convenient dates I am free. I could also conveniently make arrangements to come to Las Vegas later in October. It would be very helpful if you could let me know your available time so that I could fit it into my schedule.
Again, I wish to thank you for consenting to meet with ms. U, «
Sincerely yours,
MP rar
(Mrs.) Tarea Hall Pittman West Coast Representative
NAME
ADDRESS
PHONE
N° 1198
i i i i i < j i t i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i i
N. A. A.C.P.
PRESENTS
1976 BACHELOR OF THE YEAR
FLAMINGO HOTEL
SATURDAY, MAY 22, 1976 - 8:00 P.M.
DONATION $10.00
DOOR PRIZE N° .1198;
COMMUNITY COORDINATING
COMMITTEE
Mabel Hoggard, Honorary Chairperson
James Gay, Chairperson Claude Perkins, Vice-Chairperson
YOU ARE CORDIALLY INVITED
TO A RECEPTION
HONORING
MRS. B. BERNICE MOTEN
TO BE HELD AT THE NUGGET ROOM/SILVER NUGGET 2140 Las Vegas Blvd. No.
July 9, 1976
8:00 - 10:00 P.M.
No Host Cocktails
Hors d'oeuvres will be served
Donation $5.50
NAACP FREEDOM FUND BANQUET '89
GOAL: YEAR 2000 - THE DREAM FULFILLED
Honorary Chairman
Sheriff John Moran
Honorary Committee Members
Assemblyman Morse Arberry Chief Larry Bolden Mr. Joe Brown ■
(Commissioner Thalia Donderoj
Mr. Dale Fraser Judge Addeliar Guy I Dr. Robert Maxson Senator Joe Neal
Mrs. Sarann Knight Freddy Honorable Grant Sawyer Assemblyman Wendell Williams
Mr. Sam Armstrong Mr. David Brandsncss M Dr. Howard Coker Mr. John More
Councilman Theron Goynes A
Mayor Ron J>urie
Dr. Paul Meacham
Commissioner William Pearson
(Councilman William RobiMoM Atty. Timothy Williams Mrs. Elaine Wynn
Banquet Committee Ida MUGaineW Chairpersbn Teola Williams, Ticket; Chairperson
Shirley Barber Rosie Bui ware
Herbert Freeman
J. David Hoggard, Sr.
Marcia Washington .
Gloria Brqwn Verlia Davis’’4' Dora Harris
Meraldine Leigh Arthur Williams
■Tfte NAACf^Las^Vegas Branch
M7o rdia tty invites yo titq its H » Annual Freecfom^Fund Banquet '899
I Friday, November 17bkL989
Desert Inn CountryKuB - Terrace Room
3145 Las Vegas BNd. So.
KLas Vegas, Elevada
No Host Cocktails U 6:30 p.m.
Dinner 7:30 p.m.
Hottest Speaker
Dr. Benjamin LMNookL
NAACP EpcecutivMDirector
RSVP by Noventbe^l0/M989 hag 1702) 648-7918 or 646-166J
Single reservation - $100 Table of ten - $1/000
SEVENTEEN NINETY BROADWAY
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE
Please direct reply to:
Leonard Carter, Director
Region I
995 Market Street
16th Floor
San Francisco, Calif. 94103
415 - YU 6-6992
NEW YORK, N. Y. 10019 212-245-2100
November 13, 1970
Mr. Carl McCraven, President
Southern Area Conference
17109 Nanette Street
Granada Hills, California 913^
Dear Carl:
You will find enclosed our most recent report on memberships and assessments
of branches of the Southern Area Conference.
While a copy of this letter is being mailed to all of the branches in
your Area Conference, I am also enclosing an additional supply for your
use during the forth-coming Area Conference.
We need Z,400 members to equal last year. I believe we can reach this
goal. It will take giving that extra effort in each branch. I know you
will do all you can to assist us in this endeavor. We have several
branches with less than 50 memberships and a special effort should be
made to insure that none of these branches will lose their charters.
There will be continued staff visits throughout the balance of the year,
and a concerted effort in Los Angeles whose 2,900 memberships needed
would put us over the top.
Sincerely,
Leonard H. Carter
Regional Director
LHC :gh
cc : All Branch Presidents
All Branch Secretaries
Enclosure
HONORARY COMMITEE MEMBERS
Kenny Guinn
Governor Robert Miller
Frank Hawkins, Jr.
Rev. Willie Davis
Rev. M.D. Bennett
Rev. S.P. Parks
Don Snyder
John Mowbray
Stanley Campbell
Richard Carlson
Yvonne Atkinson Gates
James Kropid
June Whitley
NM SUPPORTING NAACP’S PROGRAMS IN:
VOTER EDUCATION, LEGAL AND COMMUNITY
ACTION, EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT, HOUSING,
YOUTH WORK AND PUBLIC INFORMATION
SPECIAL
CONTRIBUTION
FUND
MRS. TAREA HALL PITTMAN
WEST COAST REPRESENTATIVE
948 MARKET STREET, SUITE 706
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 94102
PHONE:
(415) 392-1360
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CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE SPECJiWL CONTRIBUTION TAX DEDUCT;IBL.E:
36;
M» haw continued our vat with, and for* the ghetto dwellers in cur urban contort of Wo north* Last, «M Wit*
Mo following proposal gives suggested guide lines far the wtaMishnent of «r NOCF Special ScntridutLsn fund Caraunlty Office for Nevada* Xt is understood that final plane would be completed in cooperation with Wo HA AC? national Office as it is nwssssr^ for all funds to de handled by MAS? finance Office in Mew fork*
LWSVAW.ME-SWMLM
Dm object of this project will ds to develop an RAAS? Co»- enmity Program to asst the needs of MUrosa and other minorities in ths State of Wevada in the fields of Youth work and Counsel* ins, Education, Mousing, WVlSGMmt «M Research, Ms rnsAmck- O1SM would do to develop special guldm lines to notion in these program areas far use by ths local NLKSV Branches with spool fie LssoWssnSatimW for Improving enforcement prog rams in anti* discrimination for public and private agencies working in the locality. In order to carry forward this program, an office would be established with a full time staff to direst and M- plement the work, Dre principal activity of thia office would bo to act as a resource for the local RMS? Branch and the com* enmity agencies in Me several fields listed above,
WWWMWW'
FMSKAR SS-0MLMD0Z
Ms heart of ths program would revolve around the activity of staff which would be directed by & Program Co-ordinator, Dm Frogram Co-ordinator would be responsible for developing the activities of the office and for making reports to the local Branches and the Mtlonal Board of MRAC? Special Contribution Fund and the national LxssutLvs Secretary of th© KAACP Special Contribution Fund, KMWLMMWK
Mere would also be an Administrator who would act HO Assistant to the Frogram Coordinator in developing the community program, compiling information and data for reports.
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Ms Jocratary would be principally concerned with csrrM- pondsmrs and general of flea routines.
LWLIAL SM1WLT SO-OWWARW
Mess would ds persona MOlOMd to tofti Hpsslal MS^estS which would ds ast up by the office from dims to time. An eremspls of thia type of activity would ds employing a person to direst a Itegiotratlon and Voting SamMlxn for a specified period*
APVXSOKI SMSMNWN
It is avLTSSted that there de an Advisory Committee appointed to assist in ths educational Maaes of the work of this office to meet quarterly with the ItAACP Comittee to receive reports and make reconoendatians for the on-going work of the KAAC? Som- Bjvnlty Office* Me Advisory SsMsittse would he appointed vy the HAAC? Special Contribution Fund Board of Mrectors*
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Me dvchset would include salaries of staff and travel ssponse Included alas would be such items as equipment and furniture rental, supplies, telephone, postage* printing end educational materials and rent* The estimated cost of HAACP CcrnMMity Program is
attached hereto.
WMKM OOM OP HAACP SOMKMr L0MM KMSWM stop
GO-OWUIWODW
$17,000*00 - - $18,500*00
Administrative Assistant
14,000.00 — 15,500*00
Secretary
6,000*00 — 7,000*00
Special Project Co-ordinators
10,000.00
Staff Nmvsl
§.500*00
ZWiMont and furniture rental
1,900.00
supplies
850*00
Telephone
1,200.00
Postage
§00*00
Printing and Sdueatlsnal Materials
2,500*00
Bent
1,800.00
Mis 'budget as suggested is less
than $70,000. However, it
IS reasonable to calculate that adding an amount for maeellanaoua Expense and putting in the firn figure far items like Bent, it can be expected to run approximately $70,000 • $75,000*
Xn ardor to mate a reasonable dsmsnatratisn of tush a project it Is rescmskmSM Wat it do underwritten for five er more Meara* Xn thia way, Wo dost qualified persona could do secured far staff with the aoauronss that Wo project was funded for this period of tins to develop a meaningful program far the area.
Edward H. Nigro
Maj. Gen. USAF (RET)
Executivei Vice President
THE SANDS Las Vegas, Nevada 89109 (702) 735-9111
June Z, 1966
Mrs. Tarea Hall Pittman
WeStCoast Representative
NAACP Special Contribution Fund
948 Market Street, Suite 706
San Francisco,' California 94102
Dear Mrs. Pittman: II
Your request for Mr. Hughes participation in the NAACP Special Contribu11 oi>*FuuJ been reviewed and discussed with the appropriAteMjembers of the management of Hughes Nevada OperatiSqk.
We feel that the Hugt^^orMinization has, and is continuing to do a/Xuch aj Jit can, to put the goals of your prqg^hms intyactual practice by its employment, advandMient.Apa training systems.
We, thereforg__rf»gret\m we cannot consider your request fo^a—gswmt of \he million dollars to be allocatedyiver theChext jft^e years.
We recorfnHze the prlttlems which face the Negro in America Itbday--arid/ that face every minority group.
And we hay^, in th^f/^jast, and will, in the future, the^pproy^ate amount of effort to these ^eas. I sincerely regret that the program you suggest far exceeds our potential program.
Please forgive the delay in answering your query. We did risked the time to make a complete and bompre- hQns ivp/^tudy.
Sincerely,
EHN:ew
Edward H. Nigro
EDWARD H. NIGRO
Maj. Gen. USAF (Ret)
Deputy Chief Executive Hughes - Nevada Operations
January 12, 1970
To: Mr. Robbins Cahill, Executive Secretary „ •
Nevada Resort Hotel Association 800 East Sahara Avenue Las Vegas, Nevada
From: Tarea Hall Pittman
Woodrow Wilson
J. David Hoggard
Re: FUNDING FOR SPECIAL NAACP PROJECT
We, the nuclei of the Advisory Committee of this proposed project want you to know we are appreciative of the consideration you have given to our proposal and the subsequent affirmative action taken by the Executive Committee based upon the information you furnished them.
In order for all of us to have a clear understanding, we submit the following paragraph as a summary interpretation of where we stand on the captioned matter.
We understand that the Nevada Resort Hotel Association has agreed to make Seventy-Five Thousand ($75,000.00) dollars available for the first years operation. As evidence of their good faith Anri infonfi'nnc +- In o\/ i.n 1 1 4 4- . . _ _ _ x. .• „
• •• v . VII vai<. nil liny tv ucpuoiL III Citi UW Q pu I L I Uli
of this amount immediately. We further understand the Association would require that a training program geared toward employment of minirity people within the industry be established. This would require concurrence from the labor unions involved. We also understand it would be incumbent upon us to secure participation in the project from other industries.
Assuming the above paragraph fairly summarizes our conversations with you, we offer the following comments. After re-studying our proposal, and after-many conferences among ourselves, we feel
obligated to share with you in good faith our true feelings.
(1)
During the two years we have attempted to motivate Nevada based industries to contribute to the NAACP, it was always our desire to obtain meaningful financial assistance for the oldest and most respected of the National Civil Rights organizations. Abiding by the guidelines imposed by the Association does not provide for this much needed assistance.
(2)
It was not our original intention to develop and operate a training program. We are cognizant of the need but do not wish to be competing with existing programs.
(3)
We feel it would be most difficult to assume responsibility for obtaining support from other than members’ of the Resort Association.
We have revised some of our immediate goals and believe it possible to come to a mutual understanding. Among alternatives as we understand the aims of both groups would be:
(1)
Funding the proposal for a larger amount which would permit the establishment of a self-supporting training center through a non-profit organization.
(2)
The Southern Nevada Resort Hotel Association would advance
seed money allowing for the development of all facets of the proposal. Such action would require seeking support from both public and private, sectors. (Federal, State and Local Governmental agencies, as well as from Foundations and Private Citizens).
It is our sincere collective opinion that a basis for further discussions exists. We are prepared to submit supportive outlines for each of thes alternatives, and believe.that from either, it is possible to develop the vehicle
necessary for accomplishing a worthwhile service for the members of the Resort Hotel Association as well as for the needy persons of our community.
May we re-emphasize our appreciation of the consideration you have given our proposal. We hope you are able to understand our position and permit us the opportunity for a conference, at the earliest convenient time, with you and members of the Executive Committee of the Nevada Resort.Hotel Association.
MEMORANDUM
To: Las Vegas Resort Hotel Representatives
From. Tarea Hall Rittman, West Coast Representative
Re: NAACP SPECIAL CONTRIBUTION FUND COMMUNITY OFFICE
FOR NEVADA
Date: July 18, 1969
Our Nevada NAACP Advisory Committee has drawn up a proposal in connection with our request for a grant of one million dollars to be allocated over the next five years or more.
We would expect to spend a substantial sum from this grant directly in Nevada for the implementation of our work there. Our proposal involves the establishment of an NAACP Special Contribution Fund Community Office in Las Vegas to serve the State of Nevada. The estimated cost of such a Community Office is estimated at seventy to seventy-five thousand dollars per year which would be approximately one-third of the total amount of the requested grant.
As you know, the NAACP's program is nation-wide in scope and the remainder of the money would be used for the ongoing program of the Association. Over fifty per cent of our Negroes still live in the South and NAACP continues to be concerned with the fate of the underprivileged there. Likewise, we have continued our work with, and for, the ghetto dwellers in our urban centers of the North, East, and West.
The following proposal gives suggested guide lines for the establishment of an NAACP Special Contribution Fund Community
-2-
Office for Nevada. It is understood that final plans would be completed in cooperation with the NAACP National Office as it is necessary for all funds to be handled by NAACP Finance Office in New York.
## #
SUGGESTED NAACP SPECIAL CONTRIBUTION FUND COMMUNITY PROGRAM The object of this project will be to develop an NAACP Community Program to meet the needs of Negroes and other minorities in the State of Nevada in the fields of Youth Work and Counseling, Education, Housing, Employment and Research. The methodology would be to develop special guide lines to action in these program areas for use by the local NAACP Branches with specific recommendations for improving enforcement programs in antidiscrimination for public and private agencies working in the locality. In order to carry forward this program, an office would be established with a full time staff to direct and implement the work. The principal activity of this office would be to act as a resource for the local NAACP Branch and the community agencies in the several fields listed above.
STAFF
PROGRAM CO-ORDINATOR
The heart of the program would revolve around the activity of staff which would be directed by a Program Co-ordinator. The Program Co-ordinator would be responsible for developing the activities of the office and for making reports to the local Branches and the National Board of NAACP Special Contribution Fund and the National Executive Secretary of the NAACP Special Contribution Fund.
ADMINISTRATOR
There would also be an Administrator who would act as Assistant to the Program Co-ordinator in developing the community program, compiling information and dat&. for reports.
-2-
SECRETARY
The Secretary would be principally concerned with correspondence and general office routines.
SPECIAL PROJECT CO-ORDINATORS
These would be persons employed to head special projects which would be set up by the office from time to time. An example of this type of activity would be employing a person to direct a Registration and Voting Campaign for a specified period.
ADVISORY COMMITTEE
It is suggested that there be an Advisory Committee appointed to assist in the educational phases of the work of this office to meet quarterly with the NAACP Committee to receive reports and make recommendations for the on-going work of the NAACP Community Office. The Advisory Committee would be appointed by the NAACP Special Contribution Fund Board of Directors.
BUDGET
The budget would Include salaries of staff and travel expense. Included also would be such items as equipment and furniture rental, supplies, telephone, postage, printing and educational materials and rent. The estimated cost of NAACP Community Program is attached hereto.
# # #
ESTIMATED COST OF NAACP COMMUNITY ACTION PROGRAM
STAFF
Co-ordinator
$17,000.00 -- $18,500.00
Administrative Assistant
14,000.00 — 15,500.00
Secretary
Special Project Co-ordinators
Staff Travel
Equipment and furniture rental
Supplies
Telephone
Postage
Printing and Educational Materials
Rent
6,000.00 — 7,000.00
10,000.00
5j500.00
1,500.00
250.00
1,200.00
500.00
2,500.00
1,800.00
This budget as suggested is less
than $70,000. However, it
is reasonable to calculate that addihg an amount for Miscellaneous Expense and putting in the firm figure for items like Rent, it can be expected to run approximately $70,000 - $75,000.
In order to make a reasonable demonstration of such a project it is recommended that it be underwritten for five or more years. In this way, the best qualified persons could be secured for staff with the assurance that the project was funded for this period of time to develop a meaningful program for the area.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE
LAS VEGAS BRANCH
P. O. BOX 362 LAS VEGAS, NEVADA
May 18th, 1968
Mr. Leonard H. Carter
Regional Director, NAACP
948 Market Street c) 77 <> 7" MBYPP'F'R
San Francisco, California 94102 ; J 1 J'
Dear Leonard:
You will find enclosed a photo static copy of a
letter which I received from John K. Woodburn, Deputy Secretary
of State, concerning the inquiry you made for the need for the
NAACP in Nevada to register.
Please be guided accordingly. If it is your opinion
it should be registered, please send me the material so that I
can follow through.
Sincerely, ALL, Charles L. Kellar, President
Las Vegas Branch NAACP
1042 West Owens Avenue
Las Vegas, Nevada 89106
clk/csk
Encl.
36
NMFUND
SUPPORTING NAACP’S PROGRAMS IN:
votermeducation| legal and community
ACTION, EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT, HOUSING,
YOUTH WORK AND PUBLIC INFORMATION
SPECIAL
CONTRIBUTION
MRS. TAREA HALL PITTMAN
WEST COAST REPRESENTATIVE
948 MARKET STREET, SUITE 706
SAN FRANCISCO, CALIFORNIA 94102
April 23, 1966
PHONE:
(415) 392-1360
Mr. Jimmy Gay
811 N. B Street
Las Vegas, Nevada
Dear Jimmy:
I have been tinable to reach you by phone since the phone
strike. I am afraid that I will continue to have difficulty
and am, therefore, writing you.
You know of course, that I have not heard from Mr. Maheu
or I would have let you know immediately. Naturally, I know we
are all very anxious about our project and in light of the present
atmosphere I am even more anxious for us to have our contribution
forthcoming.
Roy Wilkins wrote a very moving letter last week which gives
the NAACP position in regard to our policy. I was wondering if
you feel that it would be well for me to send Mr. Maheu a copy of
this letter explaining that our position as an organization is set
forth here. I thought this would place our application before him
again and probably clear some questions he might have regarding
helping us as a memorial to Martin Luther King, Jr. We have found
that nothing takes the place of a conference with our group. With
this in mind, I am planning to come to Vegas on the weekend of May
24th if you will be in the city then.
I'll send a copy of this letter to David and Woody with a copy
of Roy’s letter. Please let me hear from you about the advisability
of sending the letter to Mr. Maheu and anyone else you may suggest.
And, should I send the letter to Mr. Maheu to the Desert Inn or to
you to deliver to him? Please note the two last paragraph’s of
Roy’s letter especially.
Sincerely,
Tarea Hall Pittman
West Coast Representative
MP rar
Lnclosures/L letters
BOARD OF TRUSTEES: Kivie Kaplan, Chairman; Bishop Stephen G. Spottswood, Vice Chairman; Alfred Baker Lewis, Treasurer;
Roy Wilkins, Secretary; John A. Morsell, Assistant Secretary,- Robert L. Carter, General Counsel.
MEMBERS: Dr. Ralph J. Bunche, Mrs. Daisy Bates, Theodore M. Berry, Dr. Leonard L. Burns, Dr. W. Montague Cobb, Hubert T.
Delany, Earl B. Dickerson, Dr. George D. Flemmings, Dr. Buell Gallagher, Rev. Theodore Gibson, Kivie Kaplan, Judge Joseph
G. Kennedy, Walter Reuther, Robert Robertson, Jackie Robinson, Jesse Turner.
CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE SPECIAL. CONTRIBUTION FUND ARE TAX DEDUCTIBLE
©©WTZ
of Statz STATE OF NEVADA
DEPARTMENT OF STATE
CARSON CITY, NEVADA 89701 ■ : - u i
April 12,
JOHN kr. V/OOD3URN
Chief Deputy
GEORGE M. SPRADLING
Deputy
BLANCHE M, RODS
Administssattvk Assistant
1968
Mr. Charles L. Kellar
Attorney at Law
1042 West Owens
Las Vegas, Nevada 89106
Dear Mr. Kellar:
This will acknowledge your letter of April 10, 1968
pertaining to the NAACP '^organization. Astuning this
organization is a corporation,.! suggest you obtain two
copies of Articles of Incorporation certified hy the
Secretary of State where the original Articles of
incorporation are on file, and submit them to this office
with the qualification fee of $5.00.
Non-profit corporations qualified to do business in
the State of Nevada are required to adhere to Nevada
Revised Statutes section 80.010 and to designate a resident
agent pursuant to NR3 14.020 and 14.030.
If the above organization is not a corporation, the
other suggestion I can make if you wish to incorporate
would be to organize various chapters within the State of
Nevada under one of the applicable non-profit Nevada
Revised Statutes. Chapter 82 of NRS pertains to specific
Acts of the legislature enacted for those particular
organizations as listed.
John K. .Woodburn
Deputy Secretary of State
Very truly yours
JKW:brh
MkFUND
SUPPORTING NAACP'S PROGRAMS IN:
VOTER EDUCATION, LEGABAND COMMUNITY
ACTION, EDUCATION, EMPLOYMENT, HOUSING,
YOUTH WORK AND PUBLIC INFORMATION <
SPECIAL
CONTRIBUTION
1790 BROADWAY NEW YORK, N. Y. 10019 245-2100
April 10, 1966
Dear Friend:
This moment of supreme national tragedy—when we mourn the loss of our friend and
colleague, Martin Luther King, Jr.--may well have produced the last chance we shall
have to turn our course irrevocably in the direction he sought to point out for usM
As we recoil from the senselessness of his murder*we will do well to recognize that
only the most compelling manifestation of our collective will to act can fill the
vacuum caused by his death. Martin Luther King was an irreplaceable symbol of America’s
capacity to change for the better; with the symbol gone, only deeds can be meaningful.
No words can ever provide an adequate eulogy for Martin Luther King, JrB No amount of
guilt can bring him back. No expressions of dismay or regret can easily restore the
confidence of millions of Negroes, especially the young, that America might at last
be moving in the direction of its repeated promises.
And it is the young Negroes with whom I am most concerned?! What do we say to them?
How do we tell the ghetto-imprisoned young men and women, two of every three of whom
cannot find a job, that the non-violent way is the only sensible way? How do we tell
our fine young men in Vietnam that they must continue to bleed and die in remote
jungles while America denies them most of the basic human rights which Dr. King was
peacefully struggling to achieve when he was assassinated.
A great void has entered our lives as individual men and women--it has entered our
nation as well. We can expect that it will passD as all things eventually do. Meanwhile,
the struggle for civil rights must and will continue. While the extremists
attack us from both sides, we of the NAACP will carry on in the spirit of reason and
non-violence which has marked our movement for almost sixty years. Bitter as the
death of our beloved friend is to us, we will not alter our goals or our tactics.
We take this occasion, therefore, to reaffirm our commitment to freedom and equality
for all Americans. We repudiate those who would divide us or suggest that we use
violence to achieve racial justice. We ask each of you, regardless of your race,I to
join with us again, by contributing as much as you can, so that the kind of America
envisioned by Martin Luther King can become a reality—at least for his children-Ml
in our lifetimeH I ask for your most generous gift; but, this time, I ask for
more—your day-to-day involvement in the civil rights struggle until our goals are
achieved.W This is the only fitting memorial to a man who sacrificed everything for
the cause that binds us all.
BOARD OF TRUSTEES: Kivie Kaplan, Chairman; Bishop Stephen G. Spottswood, Vice-Chairman; Alfred Baker Lewis, Treasurer; Roy Wilkins,
Secretary; John A. Morseli, Assistant Secretary; Robert L. Carter, General Counsel. MEMBERS: Dr. Ralph J. Bunche, Mrs. Daisy Bates,
448 Theodore M. Berry, Dr. Leonard L. Burns, Dr. W. Montague Cobb, Hubert T. Delany, Earl B. Dickerson, Dr. George D. Flemmings, Dr. Buell
Gallagher, Rev. Theodore Gibson, Kivie Kaplan, Judge Joseph P. Kennedy, Walter Reuther, Robert Roberston, Jackie Robinson, Jesse Turner.
THE SPECIAL CONTRIBUTION FUND IS THE ONLY TAX-DEDUCTIBLE CHANNEL FOR AIDING THE WORK OF THE NAACP,
A NATION-WIDE MEMBERSHIP ORGANIZATION WITH BRANCHES IN ALL 50 STATES
STATEMENT OF MR. LEONARD H. CARTER, REGIONAL DIRECTOR, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE, TO THE CLARK COUNTY ADVISORY COMMITTEE TO THE SCHOOL BOARD TRUSTEES OF LAS VEGAS, NEVADA, NOVEMBER 1, I965.
First of all, let me express my sincere thanks and appreciation for this opportunity to officially present the view of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People to the Clark County Advisory Committee to the School Board Trustees, here in Las Vegas, Nevada.
I am very proud to state here this evening that our organization long ago recognized the importance of equal educational opportunities as a fundamental requirement in the Negroes long struggle for first- class citizenship status in the United States of America. I would like to address myself to several aspects of the problem of school segregation in the Northern and Western states. In contrast to the doctrine of legal segregation in the southern states we now find segregation in the North and West which results from housing or residential segregation. However, it is Important the record be clear at this point that in many instances segregation, based on race, has been carefully nurtured and fostered by action of local school boards administrative policies.
Education is a process of transmitting skills and values to those who have not acquired them. Previously, in a predominantly rural America the functions of education were largely performed by the family within an extended kinship system. Presently, however, the task of education has increasingly become a public business, carried on under a state school system. Education today serves the broad function of socializing the young, while at the same time transmitting the bodies of knowledge which will prepare new generations to meet the requirements of effective participation in an age of rapidly changing industrial technology. A high degree of consensus has emerged concerning the changed and expanded role of public education. It is now generally agreed that the goals of public education are to secure social, civic and educational competence through the development of critical thinking, effective communication, and creative skills. The public schools, therefore, are confronted with an immense and ever-increasing Job. Their functions have now developed to a point where it is largely the effectiveness of their
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work that determines the life chances of those who grow up in the United States. The United States Supreme Court recognized the enormity of the educational role in its historic 195^ decision. The court insisted that public schools must insure equality of opportunity to the young so that each individual might share in the decisions and benefits of the system according to demonstrated achievements of skills and talents. The court stated that it could not turn back the clock of history a half-century or more in order to Judge the matter before it; it had to "consider public education in the light of its full developement and its present place in American life throughout the Nation. Only in this way can it be determined if segregation in public schools deprives these plaintiffs of the equal protection of the laws." The decision continued in part:
Today, education is perhaps the most important function of state and local governments. Compulsory school attendance laws and the great expenditures for education both demonstrate our recognition of the importance of education to our democratic society. It is required in the performance of our most basic public responsibilities, even service to the armed forces. It is the very foundation of good citizenship. Today it is the principal instrument in awakening the child to cultural values, in preparing him for later professional training, and in helping him to adjust normally to his environment. In these days, it is doubtful that any child may reasonably be expected to succeed in life if he is denied the opportunity of an education. Such an opportunity, where the state has undertaken to provide it, is a right which must be made available to all on equal terms.
We come then to the question presented? Does segregation of children in public schools solely on the basis of race, even though physical facilities and other "tangible" factors may be equal, deprive the children of the minority group of equal educational opportunities? We believe that it does.
The notion of equal opportunity for all is inherent in the
democratic ideal of the free and open society. Public education
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today must prepare the young for mature and productive roles in the democratic system of social life. Yet is is inconceivable that public school systems permeated with racist practices, dominated by class attitudes, and segregated according to color will be able to transmit the democratic ideal. Likewise it is unreasonable to maintain that sudh school systems can guarantee equality of opportunity and promote creative talent.
Public education in the metropolis is class-based, and is now characterized by all of the in-equalities and invidiousness associated with a hardened class system. The evidence is that "our public school system has rejected its role of facilitating social mobility and has become in fact, an instrument of social and economic class distinctions in American society. . As a result the big city school systems which educate most of the country’s forty-two million children, currently replicate the prevailing class-color structure of the metropolis, and function to preserve that structure intact by controlling the lines of social ascent. Defacto school segregation is the social expression of this crucial role which urban schools play in "tracking" the young into favored and unfavored slots in the organized society. Slum children of color who do not make the grade not only drop out of school, but are in effect dropped out of the organized system, since for them there is nowhere to go but down and out. In the current urban setting,public schools are a pivotal issue in a profound social struggle between the haves and the have-nots; between those accepted and those denied by color. The struggle for equal educational opportunity has already resulted in Important modifications of educational practice that had previously been considered fixed. One authority has argued, for example, that educators cannot ignore the conflicts of the day because, as educators, they are directly involved in the perpetuation of color-class barriers which significantly alter the lives of urban school children.
As long as institutionalized forms of discrimination are maintained, as long as Negro and white children do not have a chance to touch the future in the present through integrated experiences that are meaningful, neither group is being adequately prepared for the future.
The school must be a vital institution in the whole process
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of social change. The struggles around questions of strategies and goals of integration could lead to a real revitalization of education. The problems surrounding the integration question go to the core of the guiding philosophies of American education and place the educator in the role of an engineer of social change.
It is common knowledge that the orbiting of Sputnik dramatically compelled public education to pierce through traditional education techniques in order to prepare students for the challenges of the space age. The so-called gifted child became the focus of special education via an accelerated and enriched curriculum involving new classes, teacher training, and travel to out of neighborhood schools. The new mathematics being taught in elementary schools is another obvious expression of the hurried efforts to educate for an age of computer analyses. But there was no comparable hurry in Northern educational circles to grasp the meaning of the historic Brown Decision. New approaches suggested by civil rights and intergroup relations leadership in order to secure equal educational opportunity were resisted in the name of traditional practices.
CURRENT APPROACHES TO SCHOOL DESEGREGATION
That there is a growing awareness and agreement in principle of the need for substantial changes to meet the challenges of urban education is evidenced by the steady stream of statements from Northern school boards and administrators. More significant, perhaps, is the increasing flow of studies, surveys, reports, recommendations, investigating committees and plans for action published by boards of education, professional associations, university educators and foundations. Despite many differences in approach and method, certain areas of common concern and possible action can be identified. They must be carefully inspected and evaluated in any effort to deal with the problem of remedial action.
With respect to pupil desegregation, certain basic techniques have been suggested, and are presently in use or in the planning stage, One such technique suggest that a high priority be assigned to the location of new school buildings; this would allow schools to draw from already integrated pupil populations. Another involves the rezoning of existing school boundaries between schools which
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are contiguous but racially distinct in order to achieve better balance. Another more extensive approach requires the re-organization of "pairs" of elementary schools which are fairly close to each other, but distinct in racial composition. In the well-known Princeton Plan, one school in the pair houses all students from both districts for half of the grade levels, and the other houses all students in the remaining grade levels. A third device to implement desegregation rest upon shifting feeder patterns from elementary to Junior, or Junior to senior high schools. Another widely used technique is a system of weighted transfer or "open enrollment," whereby certain schools are designated as sending schools and others as receiving schools; students from the former type are allowed to transfer--within certain capacity limits—to the latter type. It should be pointed out that each of these devices has distinct limitations. The various re-zoning devices are effective only around the periphery of ghetto areas.
TEACHER DESEGREGATION
The desegregation of teaching staffs and the Institution of non- discriminatory hiring and promotion practices have been generally accepted, although implemented with varying degrees of intensity. Changes in curricula for teacher training to include course work and practical experience in urban problems have been widely proposed, yet few such programs are currently available. More intensive inservice training of teachers in urban education and Intergroup relations is a must in any forward-looking school system. A good deal of attention must be given to encouraging more qualified and dedicated teachers to take assignments in the so-called "problem" schools of the cities.
COMPENSATORY EDUCATION
In the area of compensatory education, experimental programs and demonstration projects have mushroomed over the past few years. While many problems remain unsolved, it has been shown that preschool readiness programs, remedial reading and guidance, introduction of improved teaching materials, reduction of pupil-teacher ratios, after-school study centers, and tutorial programs can have a substantial and often dramatic effect in educationally deprived areas. What seems to emerge from the great variety of programs which have been under-
6-
taken is that a sympathetic, informed and enthusiastic staff, working under somewhat improved conditions, can raise aspiration and achievement rapidly over a relatively short time. Indeed, one author has.'? suggested that it is less the particular content of any given program than the enthusiasm and higher expectations of the staff that accounts for the success of many such projects.
THE COMMUNITY SCHOOL
There is a growing consensus that relations between schools and the community in depressed areas need to be either improved or fundamentally changed. Some attention has been given to the idea that the schools not only need to enlist community support for existing programs, but indeed should involve area residents in their conduct. What is required is not merely the success of given programs, but the stimulation of citizen participation in school affairs and the creation of local constituencies to support school reform and change. One suggestion made in this direction is that schools must become a focal point for a broad range of community activities, or perhaps the center of community life. Another suggestion is that to facilitate closer relations between schools and community, administration and responsibility in metropolitan school systems must be substantially decentralized in order to offer greater local involvement and flexibility.
TREATMENT OF NEGROES IN TEXTBOOKS (Please see attached statement)
CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS
One hundred and twenty years ago, Horace Mann referred to education as, the great equalizer of the conditions of men...the balance wheel of the social machinery." The wheel is out of balance. As the one institution with which every Negro comes into intensive and prolonged contact, the public school offers the greatest opportunity to break down the cultural barrier that helps block the Negro's advance into the main stream of American life. But, the opportunity is being muffed; no city in the United States has ever begun to face-up to the problem involved in educating Negro--or for that matter, white-slum youngsters."
Today, and even more, tomorrow, requires something the world has
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never seen--masses of educated men. Hence, the task of the school system is not just to turn out masses of literate men; it is to turn out vast numbers of people educated considerably beyond the level that previous societies demanded only of their ruling elite.
I would like to make the following recommendations:
1.
That meaningful steps be taken to eliminate, as far as possible, racially segregated schools. A more equal racial balance in school enrollment is of great importance.
2.
The Board of Education must adopt a statement of policy clearly recognizing the moral and educational value of an integrated school system. The statement must firmly endorse the Supreme Court's decision of May 17, 195^-
3.
A policy of non-discriminatory employment practices must be established in the hiring, assignments and upgrading of teachers and other school personnel.
4.
Compensatory educational projects must be established as a part of the school curriculum with special emphasis upon the teaching of reading.
5.
The pre-school centers must become a permanent part of the Las Vegas school system. "Operation Headstart" in 1965 has been hailed as a significant new innovation in the teaching process.
6.
New text must be introduced to the school system that will factually restore the Negro into his proper role in United States History. Stereotyped illustrations of the Negro must be eliminated and Negroes must become a part of the American scene. Several states have recently recognized this terrible omission and new text are being developed along with supplementary material. The California General Assembly has enacted a state law covering the matter of Negroes and school text. I am making a copy of that statute available to the committee.
7.
Special human relations courses should be developed for all school administrators and teachers.
8.
Full use should be made of monies available through the Educational Act of 1969 to add compensatory educational programs and I specifically recommend that special emphasis be made upon the need to stock our libraries with books about the Negro and his
contribution to American society.
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9° Careful scrutiny must be made in the selection of any new school sites and a criteria that its effect on the desirable goal of integration be of prime consideration.
10.
Full use must be made of our school facilities by the community and the school should become a focal point in community life.
11.
I strongly recommend that the school board employ an expert in the field of racial desegregation to assist in developing a meaningful plan most suited to this community.
In the tension ridden world, in which we live, it is becoming increasingly apparent that man will only be able to survive if he learns to live in peace with his fellow man. In America the root of our problem of race relations is the separateness of the environment in which we live. Persons separated by racial factors tend to be suspicous;. distrustful, fearful and easily induced to hatred of one another. The schools have contributed greatly to this racial dilemna and I hope that the Las Vegas school administrators will strive to reverse the segregation practices of the past.
NATIONAL ASSOCIATION FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF COLORED PEOPLE SOUTHERN AREA CONFERENCE
NAME OF BRANCH
MEMBERSHIPS
1969
JAN. 1, to OCTI 31,
ASSESSMENT 1970
ASSESSMENT PAID 1970
1970
QUOTA
Antelope Valley
51
119
100
$ 200.00
$
Banning
72
30
75
200.00
Barstow
76
36
100
300.00
25.00
Beverly Hills
156
169
300
1,200.00
Blythe
80
59
75
200.00
100.00
Compton
316
113
500
700.00
Indian Wells
102
113
100
550.00
559.98
Imperial Valley
75
18
100
250.00
Indio
55
14
50
200.00
40.00
Long Beach
64
104
200
500.00
Los Angeles
5,599
2,668
7,500
2,500.00
2.00
S. Los Angeles
84
180
300
750.00
Monrovia
66
29
100
200.00
Oceanside
8
70
50
200.00
Oxnard-Ventura
178
83
200
550.00
480.00
Palm Springs
52
50
Pasadena
597
550
600
1,200.00
Perris-Elsinore
101
62
100
300.00
Pomona
138
107
100
250.00
Riverside
354
279
300
800.00
800.00
San Bernardino
58
51
200
550.00
San Diego
251
243
500
850.00
San Fernando
243
258
300
650.00
San Gabriel
63
42
100
200.00
San Pedro-
Wilmington
110
39
100
350.00
Santa Ana
172
74
100
350.00
Santa Barbara
146
88
200
800.00
200.00
Santa Monica
103
94
150
450.00
400.00
Las Vegas
330
479
500
1,000.00
1,000.00
Totals:
9’648
6.223 13,000 $16,250.00 $ 3,606.98