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Depictions of Black people in various media and advertisements (including offensive caricatures, racist slogans and names, and non-Black people in Blackface)

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Date
1890 to 1940
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Folder from the Roosevelt Fitzgerald Professional Papers (MS-01082) -- Personal and professional papers file.

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man001161
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man001161. Roosevelt Fitzgerald Professional Papers, 1890-1996. MS-01082. Special Collections and Archives, University Libraries, University of Nevada, Las Vegas. Las Vegas, Nevada. http://n2t.net/ark:/62930/d1kk97t5g

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i inrimi vi , Fm the Kid TtatMldK Tyrv^U. ^norui. . Complete Words and Mode.**.70 Complete tblMtnimwt Or- cheotration for the SMI re Freer am (m word*)..... MO- - FMbl«. , .• nuJt^dAcMet. with Opening .>' . Oeret). - - Complete Worde and Man* W-7» . - Compote **r • <. ePost ration fee tftelntlro ,M;iitsL. DENISONCOMPANY, Publishers y Ol.8oatk,Wftath Av«na« . .! OTICAGO r^l— Lorre Soac-v'' ., , . la the Krening Br the Moonlight, II’irJtd,W Virietlee.MSdeet- heerts. • I >7 Mad Pie Dtye My Miaaf’i Twilight Lallalfr. Steepin' A round. • Ota Fashioned Rose. If I Wu Whet I Ain't Instead of •WANKS BONG MO4RAM 01X11 SONS PAOQRAU _ _ Babesia Opening thorns..... •J < r Cemptfir 11 <*• .m. cMotratlen.t*' **• Intleo • -Pegram (de words)...... KOO L .^ JUSItfS SONO PROGRAM > Plantation Opeataa Cheron. a'My juVt Bungalow. v . OU Planiadoe 8t* ' , ' • I Didn't Ask. Ha Dtda't Say. So I In Wrong! So tong.. OM Faahioaed neat, ‘ . 1 Pat Cut/i lahaboutz ; , Then The/-Start AB Oros Again- : . Onafi Nmm'MmL' - De Wes* Wind' Bloats frost de Won'. I town Along' Sown Shady Ian* ' Leek Oat Below. .. * ' • ', ,y , Bohenia Finale (toctadad U.Open- lag Cboraa).,-v - * • Complete Words and Muelo.SKT* Complete 11.Instrument Or* , chest rati Mt for the Retire . I •'. Program (no words);...... MO ALABAMA SQNG PROGRAM the booster club of BLACKVILLE A COLORED COMEDY CONCOCTION BY harry l. newton author of t-runa j Tramp with a Tramp. Special Salts-' ®" '. rti .l, Fan- "The Troubles of Rozinsh." defille," "Women's Ways. Good hforma. Judge," and "Words to the W i»* CHICAGO T. S. DENISON & COMPANY Publishers THE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. CHARACTERS. Hon. Bill JohnsonRunning for Judge Abraham Lincoln Washington. ...Running for Chickens William Bilkins SmithRunning for Anything Charles Augustus Hotfoot.Too Slow to Run for Anything James Jackson Muchmouth. . .Running for a Crap Game Garfield Fussfeathers.........................A Chicken Inspector Alex ander Brutus ThicklipsPork Chops Inspector Rufus Rastus Goggenheimf.rHealth Inspector Horace Wetweather Cutup........................Razor Inspector Michael Angelo Wishbone...................................An Artist Time—Just Before a Political Campaign. Time of Playing—About Twenty-live Minutes. COSTUMES. All costumes to be as grotesque as circumstances will per.mit, following your own ideas, or. per the following sug.gestions. as you may see fit: For instance, Hon. Bill John.son wears a black Prince Albert coat, red vest, green neck.tie high white collar and old straw hat. All others to be dressed equally as ridiculous. All characters black-face. \ singing quartette should play the parts of Hotfoot, W ash.ington. Muchmouth and Fussfeathers, and a few songs may be successfully introduced in places indicated in sketch. STAGE DIRECTIONS. R. means right of the stage; C., center: R. C., right center; L., left; 1 first entrance; U. E., upper entrance, etc.; D. F., door in flat or back of the stage. The actor is sup.posed to be facing the audience. COPYRIGHT. 1907. BY T. 8. DEXISON. 2 MADE IN U. S. A. THE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. Scene : Club room of the Booster Club. Doors R. and L. A table about four feet wide and six feet long stands center stage Table is covered with a black cloth except top, which is covered with paper painted black; a board of sufficient width to permit a man to stand on it being placed across the center On floor inside table is placed something soft, to permit a man’s fall without injury; there is also a dummy figure with very fine wire attached, running into flies, as per instructions^! finish of sketch. The following props are necessary. Large wooden razor for Hotfoot; a dozen ordinary tin horns and two large imitation firecrackers, one with practical fuse. At rise of curtain Hotfoot is discovered sitting in chair with feet on table, asleep; he has a feather duster in right hand. At curtain well up Muchmouth enter R. door, discovers Hotfoot, goes to him, takes duster out of his hand, tickles his face with feathers. Hotfoot (slightly moving his position, but not opening eyes) I done told yo’ dat chicken needed more singeing. ' Muchmouth (dropping duster, astonished). Well, what yo’ all think of dat? Dat nigger eats chicken in his sleep (Laughs ) Dat chicken needs more singeing. Ha, ha. ha. (Picks up duster.) He’s de laziest coon dat ever drawed de breath of life. If he got as much as a dollar a week wages he’d hire somebody to do his breathm fo him. Charles Augustus Hotfoot, I’m a-goin’ to give yo all a hotfoot on de foot. (Hits Hotfoot's foot with wood end of duster.) Hotfoot (not moving). De man on de front platform has got my transfer. . . . Muchmouth. Dat doggone coon done thinks heisi takin a car ride now. I’ll give him a transfer all right. (Pounds Hotfoot on back, yells.). Here, yo, wake up! wake up! 3 4 THE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. Hotfoot (not filming). Let me off at— (Name local street). Muchmouth (laughs loudly). Dere ainti no miked blood in him. He’s all coon and den some. Nobody but a real coon can sleep like dat. (Drops duster, then looks at Hotfoot and slowly scratches head reflectively.) How am I goin’ to wake him up? Oh. pshaw! Why didn’t I think of dese befo’? (Pulls a pair of dice from his pocket, then goes to table, rattles them «” his hand and then throws dice on tabIf.) Come on, dice, be good to me; baby wants a new automobilly. Hotfoot (at rattle of dice, slowly opens his eyes, then blinks them very fast, then -when dice strike the table he lets his feet fall to floor and then whirls about to look at dice, yells) : Little Joe! Two bits yo’ don’t come. Muchmouth (grabbing dice and putting them in his pocket: speaks in dignified manner ). Mr. Hotfoot, as much as I may desire to dally-wid de festive dice, I want to say right here dat dis am no time fo’ dem. De why and wherefo’ am dese: Hotfoot (sitting down). Proceed wid your obligations, Mr. Muchmouth. Muchmouth. Well, de because of de non existence of de welcome appearance <4 3 couple of dice, are dese: De Booster Club of Blackville, of vihich I am a honored mem.ber— Hotfoot (yawning). Me, too. ' Muchmouth. Yo’ ain’t nothin’, shut up! De Booster Club am a-goin’ to enter de cornin’ campaign wid de deter.mination to elect one of our honored and disdinguished members to de bench— Hotfoot. De wash bench? Muchmouth. No. no; a judge's bench. We’re a gom to elect de Hon. Bill Johnson to a seat on de bench. Hotfoot. De Hon. Bill Johnson will make a great judge. He’s a good judge now—of gin. Muchmouth. And he s a good judge, too. Hotfoot. None better. He’s tried all de gin dat ever was made. THE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. Much mouth. Well, dat ain’t neither here no^iere. Hotfoot No. I wish some of it was here. I rn dry. Much mouth. De reason I came down to de club room so early dis evenin’ is because (pause). Hotfoot (pause). I thought dat was de "ason. Much mouth. Was because—I mean, is because. I wished to get everythin’ in rediness fo to receive our exalted 'and renowed guest of de evenin’-Hon. Bill Johnson! b'dftSU. n*SKtr -in' <,TvCHHho^SH.'V'L^k hcah. Mr. Charier AuguMu._H«; foot, where do yo’ get a license to make so much noise. Yo' ain't so many. , , , HOTFOOT. I reckon yo' amt counted me lately. MUCH MOUTH. Yo' ain’t nothin' but a gum-lip Alabama breed yo'self. Don’t forget dat yo' am talkin to a genuine Georgia colored person, and a member of de Georgia four hUHoT^OT. Yes. de other three hundred and ninety-nine ain’t done served out dere sentence yet. , . Much MOUTH. Furthermore and howsome ever, yo ;aint nothin’ but de janitor of dis club room, understand. De man dat sweeps de floor clean fo me to walk on, under- SUHotfoot. Yes. an’ every time yo’ walk on de floor dat noojfldhd overworked broom looks at me and says: Here - ''where I got to go to work agin.” Understand. Much mouth Don’t you dare insinuate dat I m not on speakin’ terms wid a cake of soap. Hotfoot. I don t sinuate. , , Much mouth. Dat’s right—don t insinuate. Hotfoot. I won't: but yo’ can t stop me from alludm Much mouth. Oh. pooh-pooh! Hotfoot. De same to yo’ and a couple of tuttuts besides. Enter Washington, door R. Washington (striking a dignified attitude just innde doorj. Hotfoot, why don’t yo open dem door. (Hot- 6 TtfE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. FOOT and Mvchmovth look at each other and laugh.) Well, what am de cause of dem laughs? , Mvchmovth. We has to laugh at de grammar yo talk. Hotfoot. Yes. it am scandiculous. Washington. What did I done said? Mvchmovth. Yo' all said: “Why didn't yo' open dem door ?”  . Washington. Well, am t dat correct. Mvchmovth. Decidedness no. Yo’ should a said: “Whv didn't you open those door." not dem door Hotfoot. Yes. de adjetatum always follows de adjeta- tive I'm susprised at your vo-cab-o-lie-nch. Washington. Yo' little shrimp, I’ll swallow yo m a Hotfoot If yo' do you 11 have more brains in yo stom.ach den yo' ever had in yo' head. (They advance threaten.ingly toward each other. ) , . MVCHMOVTH (between). Gentlemen, gentlemen; don t have trouble wid each other. . .. „ •, Hotfoot. Trouble? Wid him? Not on yo life. He d be a cinch fo’ me—not trouble at all. Washington. I didn't come heah to fight no low down person. . Hotfoot. Well. I ain t so particular-. , Mvchmovth. Now, now; don't be peevish. Yo am makin* too much noise. , , T , Washington. Yes. bein’ as it am t de Fourth of July Hotfoot. Well, any time yo’ think I am t a whole bunch of firecrackers, just get warm around me and watch me explode—dat's all. , . , .  u Mvchmovth. Heah. heah! \o am makin too much noise in one spot. Move around a little and scatter it— scatter it! (Knock sounds on door R. outside.) Washington (to Hotfoot). Mr. Peevish Janitor, dere am a knock on those door. Mvchmovth. Yes, dar am someone widout. Hotfoot. Widout what? THE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. 7 Much mouth. Go out and see. (Hotfoot sits down.) Washington (to Hotfoot). Did yo’ heah Mr. Much- mouth address yo ? Hotfoot. Yes, I heah him. Washington. Did yo’ also heah dat knock on those d°HoTFOOT. Yes, I done heah dem knock on dose doah. Much mouth. Well, dem knock on dose doah means dat a gemmen outside is desirious of enterin’. Hotfoot. Dere ain’t no gemmen out dere. Dere is only a common nigger: and if he is desirious of enterin’ he can open de doah and walk in. Washington (threateningly). Yo’ had better open dat doah. Hotfoot. I Better hadn't. Washington. Yo’ better had. Hotfoot (pulls large razor from hip pocket ana feels of edge). I better hadn't. Washington (looks at razor). Den I better had. ((joes to door R., opens it.) Enter Fussfeathers door R., stands with arms folded across breast, just inside door. MUCH MOUTH (to Hotfoot). Denounce de gemmen. Hotfoot. Denounce him yo’self. Much mouth. De gemmen am waitin’ to be denounced. Yo’ better denounce him. Hotfoot (significantly displaying razor). I better hadn’t. MucnMOUTH. Yo’ better had. Hotfoot (rising and advancing threateningly toward Muchmouth). I better hadnt. MUCH MOUTH. Den I better had. (To Fussfeathers.) Mr. Garfield Fussfeathers, yo’ am denounced. Come in and take a chair. , Hotfoot. Yes, come m and take all de chairs—we don t care (The four take chairs, bring them to table, sit down and'put feet on table. All should wear large shoes, and when feet are Placed on table a good comedy effect may 8 THE BOOSTER CLUB.OF BLACKVILLE. be produced by moving the eight feet back and forth, and on top of each other, etc.} . . , . . t Muchmouth (after comedy effect with feet). • ** members of de Bolster Club am now congregated. What am on de table dis evenin ? Hotfoot. Feet—dat s all feet. Washington. I move dat de feet be removed Muchmouth. I second de motion and forthwith set de example, (puts feet on door.) » Fussfeathers. Me too. (Feet on floor.) Washington. Me too. (Washington puts his feet on . floor. Hotfoot keeps feet on table and the other Uiree tiok inquiringly at him for a few seconds.) I said I moved dat de feet be removed from de table. Muchmouth. And I done second de motion. Fussfeathers. Me too. , . ., HOTFOOT. I prefer to keep my beloved feet on de table. Muchmouth. Yo’ better hadn t. Hotfoot I better had. {Pulls tqzot.) . Washington. I move dat Brother Hotfoot keeps hia De razor am mightier den de power of speech, therefo’ second de motion. NHjch^mouth^'( fo^FussFF.ATHERS). Brother Fussfeathers, ^HotTooV™ His n'ame^ani3 a ^guarantee dat chickens must . , . . . ;# (iev desire to cackle in de mornin . X heah from me '"‘hotfoot, "tes. later am right. Daft de onlyiett time c'w™sH^^ himl him 1 ... L'l^T). Yo- am ignored-what- ever dat is. To tell de truth— , Hotfoot. Fer de first time m yo life— am a Tuesday. Hotfoot. 1 Smith. \o am Hotfoot. Smith. Hotfoot. Smith. Hotfoot (fingerm Smith. and bows Genimen. yo' mean. I sail gemmen. Yo’ better say gemmen. r) Yo’ better had. r at Hotfoot ). 1 said 1 better hadn t. change yo' mm. in - minute, if dere is any left to mah ,„ind-(turns and Smith. I said 1 n«: I"usor; blinks his eyes, etc., sees Hotfoot, «• fto ,sJ°^ mfnd on a Thursday-but dis 1 neV:et.Always change mah mind on a Tuesday. Den we am all gemmen? •°Den"uke off yo' hat and bow pretty. EVsaid take off yo’ hat and bow pretty. I don’t know how to bow pretty.^ , b i does7 (Takes off hat Come to think of it. 1 aoes. v --------- A few more lessons and yoll be Hotfoot (to Smith), n THE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. Fess feathers. W - gj* To ten de truth. I ain’t been feelin’ very well l^ely. Hotfoot. Dere s dat ^y^^ o{ yQ. alight attack of d^'shoL a £^,o-. IM chick- ens alone in de heahafter. Smith. How-de-do, men.~ Hotfoot. <------ Smith. I said men. W HOTFOOT. DA -- , SMITH. I better hadn t. Hotfoot (pulls razor) Smith (not looking c. - 10 THE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. a right pert bower. Dey tell me yo’ all am goin' to run fo somethin' in de comin campaign. Smith. I sure am goin to run. Hotfoot. I reckon yo’ all better start now. (Chases Smith, razor in hand, about stage and then runs off K., then comes back to center stage.) I believe dat everybody should get a good start when dey run for office. Much mouth. Look heah. Hotfoot, yo' ain't got no right to dictate to weuns round heah. Yo ain t de President ci de Booster Club; are yo' de President? Hotfoot No, sah; heah am de President. (Holds «/> razor ) And de Secretary and de whole doggone shootm match. He am strictly business, too. Anytime yo' am desir- ious of questionin' his authority, I’ll see dat yo’ get a special permit—a special permit, sah. . , Fussfeathers. What am Brother Smith a-runmn to t Hotfoot. Because he can’t fly. Fussfeathers. I meant what political office was he a-runnin' fo’ ? Muchmouth. We don't know. Hotfoot. Well, he’s got a fine start; he ought to catch whatever he’s after. Enter Goggenheimer and Wishbone. R. Wishbone (to Hotfoot). Heah, boy, take my hat. OTugen. Yes, bov, take our hats. (Offers hat.) , Hotfoot. Say, who do yo’ all think yo’ all am talkm to? Wishbone. To de highly esteemed janitor of de Booster Club. (wy.c.EN. Yes, to de highly esteemed— Hotfoot. Well. I ain't highly steamed; but I m gettm warm—gettin’ mighty warm. Yo’ better keep yo’ old hats. Wishbone. We better hadn t. Goggen. No, we better hadn’t. ~ Hotfoot (reaching for razor). De President of de Booster Club reckons yo' better had. Wishbone. We better hadn't—President or no President. Goggen. No, we better hadn't—not fo’ four Presidents. I reckon it was, Brother Cutup. As I was shoulders to de wheel and all work THE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. U Muchmouth (aiwlf)- [ bet dey better had. Hotfoot (fulls razor, whets it f^^^ep yo' l^ts' De President reckons as how yo all better keep y W.Lwfcl. It .m entirely agree- JrnrLXn retain onr hat,. <S-,» *<.'« > JwJsHBONE^getAer). We don’t seem to do daTancTwe shall retain our hats, ^othfut^s on J Mat foot Well, jes take em off. De rules ana rc^ inflations of dis heah club particular specify and prescribe Hat no hats be on de head. rJ£.p.s I know dat, but yo’ all got yours on. I know I has, but I carries a special permit, see? (Flourishes razor.) GeeCES. We see. Wishbone. Me too. The-v all gather about table and engage in shooting dice, .kin der Curve and TmcKurs. Th,, fay na aMnMn lo th' alherr, b«l dmm Mg' la Thickl’PS. I tell yo', sah, de issue of dis campaign is— Hotfoot^ Rats! (He is busy with dice and apparently .'"t’h"c^"^aa^l <.ba.it'!. Rats! Who said rats? CutS. I reckon it was one of dem low-down coons yonder. Thicklips. sayin', we must put our “ffXS’cLittle Joe—little Joe! Thicklips. Little Joe ? Dat sounds familiar like. (H inks hlS(2uTvr (pulling Thicklips’ sleeve}. Dere am a crap (Etfz <*)• Cutup. Yes, stop it. 12 THE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. Hotfoot (turning). Who’s a-talkin*? Cutup. Two prominent members of de Booster Club. Hotfoot. How prominent am yo’ ? Thicklips. I am Alexander Brutus Thicklips, pork chops inspector. Cutup. And I am Horace Wetweather Cutup, razor inspector. Hotfoot (coming to them). Well. I ain't so glad to know yo'. I ain’t got no pork chops about .me to be inspected, but I got my friend. Mr. Razor. (Pulls razor.) Yo' can start in inspectin' dat any time yo' am desir ions of same. Cutup (backing array). I ait|t on duty dis evenin’. Hotfoot (to Thicklips). How about yo ? Thicklips (backing away). If yo’ ain t got no pork chops about yo’ clothes dat need inspectin’, dat lets me out. thank yo’. Hotfoot. Don't mention it.(Bows low.) Smith enter door R.. running. Smith. Hooray! hooray! here comes de Hon. Bill Johnson. Everybody hurry to give him welcome. (All exit door R., cheering, except Hotfoot. He sits on table.) Hotfoot. Any old time I hurry up to give welcome to Bill Johnson—I should say not nit. I knows dat Bill Johnson and he knows me. He ain’t nothin’ but a low-down black white washer. If he am elected judge, and he ever gets me in front of him—well, I can see mah finish through iron bars—dat s all. Horns are blown off stage, then cheers follow’ and all come on door R., Johnson in center, strutting proudly, with one hand thrust in breast of coat and bowing right and left. He steps on chair, then on table, while all blow horns and cheer. MUCH MOUTH. Silence! Members of de Booster Club of Blackville, allow me to introduce t yo’ de Honorable Bill Johnson, nominee fo’ judge of de circuit court. (All cheer and blow horns.) THE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. 13 Hotfoot (aside). I'll Hare him to make a speech. Muchmouth. Judge, we’d feel honored if you would favor us wid one of your celebrated speeches. (AU cheer and blow.) . - ,. . Johnson. Friends and fellow citizens. On dis, de evenin’ of one of de greatest campaigns in de history of— de history of— Hotfoot (aside). De judge am stuck. Johnson. Well, whatever history it is. Dere are so many histories dat it am impossible to disremember which one dis is. However, yo’ all knows jes as well as I does, so 1 won’t linger longer on dat subject, but pass on to de next one On dis—on dis— (Looks down and sees Hotfoot fingering razor). On dis most suspicious occasion— Muchmouth (correcting). Auspicious, judge-auspi- cious. Not suspicious. Johnson (looking nervously at Hotfoot) Well, it looks mighty suspicious to me. However, yo all know jes as well as I does, so we’ll pass to de next subject. De question dat am agitatin’ dis country today, is de question of—de Question of. However, yo’ all know jes as well as I does, so we’ll pass to de next subject. (All cheer and blow horns.) Hotfoot (after noise). He’s a great speech maker—I ^joyNSON (bowing). Friends, it makes mah heart beat fast when I see de enthuse—enthuse—well, when I see what yo’ all know what I mean, so 111 not linger no longer, but pass on to de next subject. De next great question dat am agitatin’ dis glorious country today, am de question of— de question of—(scratches head reflectively.) Hotfoot (aside). De judge is stuck agam. F!1 have to help him out. (Gets off table and exit door R. Others blow horns.) . , „ , , JOHNSON. However, vo’ all know jes as well as 1 does, so we 11 pass to de next subject. De great vital question dat am gnawin’ at our vitals and givrn’ de whole creation de stomach ache, am de race question. Oh. my benumbed and benighted hearers, de race question am a great thing. De black man ain’t got no show in dis country anymore. u THE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. Why. jes' look—jes' look, my black brethern. at de race question. l.ast Saturday I bet money on three races and lost. Has a black man any chance? No. sah. A white book.maker took all mah money. Dat s de race question fo yo. All blow horns, while Hotfoot enters door R. He has the large firecrackers in his hand; he sneaks to table and places firecrackers under it, lighting the one with practical fuse; the others pay no attention to him. Johnson (not appearing to notice Hotfoot}. I tell )o, friends and fellow citizens, dere is goin’ to be an upheaval. Hotfoot (aside). I wonder if he knows what's undteri him ? Johnson. Dere am goin to be somethin happen purty soon dat 11 shake up some of us black persons Hotfoot (aside). Yo’ am right, Bill, and you 11 be de first one to feel it. Johnson. We have been layin’ quiet too long. We need somethin' to stir us up. (.dll cheer A Hotfoot (aside). And you 11 get somethin in jes a minute. Johnson. Things can't go on as dev have been goin . I fell—I feel dat somethin’ is goin’ to happen. Dat underneath dis quietness, dere lies—here lies^— Hotfoot (aside). I wonder if he s wise? Johnson. Dere lies an explosive mine dat is waitin fer to be ignited by some hot-headed leader, and den will be an eruption. Hotfoot (aside). Yer a good guesser, Bill. Here she goes. (A loud explosion ensues, produced off stage by firing a shotgun into an empty barrel, a pan of red fire is lighted at same time. As explosion occurs Johnson falls through paper top in table and disappears from view of audience; another explosion follows and dummy figure is yanked into THE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. IS flies, then allowed to fall back into table again. Then Johnson stands up in table. Meanwhile he has made spots on his face with a wet cloth, torn his collar and looks gen.erally disheveled. He faces audience with oratorical effect.) Johnson. However, fellow citizens, yo’ all know as well as I does, so we'll pass to de next question. (Quick curtain to sheers and blowing of horns, while Hotfoot does a war dance about table.) T 8. DENISON L COMPANY, Publishers 623 S. Wabash Ave„ CHICAGO An Awful’Appetite By WADE STRATTON Price, 25 Cents Blackface skit for 2 males. Time. 15 minutes. Ous. who is darky talking act is a banquet of lauans. __. Payin’ A Bet By VINCENT DENITO Price, 25 Cents Ri.rkface skit for 2 males. Time, 15 minutes. Unable to ^rh‘VnT"nbom:bfn ‘a" SMSSE ^e^S.'S ffiki bet by riding Henry nome in the art of debating ls tomensV A^>vel^idei^lk sketch for minstrels or vaudeville. A Black Recruit By ARTHUR LEROY KASER Price. 25 Cents  . « m«ies. Time. 15 minutes. Private Oilcan, Oar k yskl tfor .-^te-man in the sixty-second regiment, gets whose P>PPy gjjt. Wise, who has a lot of trouble in mak- hls ®ritl^« recruit A lively bit of negro nonsense. ^‘f^Iif <^" ^udeville procram or club ent.r- tai nm ent _________ A Pair of Hash Hounds By QENE MORGAN ' Price, 25 Cents mtalkins act for 2 males. Time. 15 minutes. George. B # £ iiSch shop, seeks a waiter for his “bean bazaar. who once held a job for twenty years because he couidnt Zeke, who once . .d knowledge of the operation of a goulash Sras^- T’niw’Sll by a new writer with L new line of comedy. No Sense, Nohow By ARTHUR LEROY KASER Price, 25 Cents Negro talking act for 2 ™1£ Uno of a^ment for t^ blacmace to eden The ragtlme dtepute a ocr^m. Chance for «ng or dance.   j <VBBb FIXSHY minstrel xosW'RS IN FULE colors Handsomely lithographed' post- ' era in full colore, for advertising your minstrel show.. <. Four different posters, each in standard (21x28 inches), suitable for either win.dow or outdoor display.. The iDnstra- tioos show the three designs greatly re.duced,1 but the posters themselves must : be seen to appreciate, the. rich color combinations which- combine. artistic ' merit with strong advertising value. They are made exclusively for our customers, and are not obtainable else.where. They are flashy and catchy, arresting attention instantly-. “Dater strips,” announcing date and pace of your show, can be made , by your local printer and' pasted to bottom edge of posters. Pirate uote: We do not mi-. print posters; we do not .handle de.signs other than those here EMed; posters come in one size only. Due to difficulty and. expense in packing and mailing, each order must be for . at least one dozen. Quantity orders may - be assorted. Be sure to specify de.signs wanted. THE DESIGNS Minstrel First-Part Qrde. ' :s Minstrel Endman. . •  r . Minstrel Man and Girl. Minstrel Comedian. •PRICE* ' J . ? •.i Per Dozen, Poetpald.. . . .... . - Per SO, Postpaid.i.....••S Per 100, Postpaid. .......-..........— Ut- S. DENISON & COMPANY^ Publishers <23 South Wabash Avenue — - CHICAGO XXHHii By W»t SriATfnw. -A .. vo i olnurtl ihH and violently arranged with end Pl> and comebacks; en<UMu eluding verses, cooundrunw aM.ar looueo; tbiM laai blackface dtlttji GGGHHSSOT Ready-Made Mmsfrel FirsTParts .b. ^ncV cedure to b« followed in‘frOm^^F^kru ««-» fc-la. Instruct too* (or action And Mttibulnta from rtK , , , • , ltu Them boob, win prove . di^.^Kw’ihly lack tbo personal counsel and b”*"”',?* aMte.ro, and give-bin upper •tag. an e.pertly routined show V | npminal c . ai w aMd foe a troupe of an, SIAS’S*** ’W "* """" JZ bo Coined cosopleta from tta ^bfcber* • . >' _: .--------------- bw.no. Mln.tr.! Flr.t-P.rOr MxlO Mlnatrol Flrat-Part^^^Ohn L S^anno... jublla. Mlnatrol f Irat-PaKl tz^koltn ®- V Price. 2»Cent. me—I Mlwtm Oarictown Mlnatrol nrot.PbrtiW'WM*, <_______________ . ^KeyW^MWs^W" sa ^s£^Sgjf!S&3£& -----------1 wish aobdiviaieM under whieb are . ta^lJany In. JIow to Staged* Wn&eJL.Sljtflv vna-k ".Oj- «h.L kAa L ad XneJ b^ltl ______ ijlj^ ' 's r.'.Xa;1 TiU DENISON A COMPANY, FtAttert, ar SwA VA.A Arraam, CHICAGO „iSr3a and novelty t^jelc the trooaw nod esoaset re boo reals J' wbenr to It dSnS.0 lirM-pari, 0HorJ»<»«J«^ *“*“ lldty, pee. ram arran/amerrt*. etc. -r »rat-part eettlnUa^ - : By Naaav k dUlobwm, oocnednrma. y ifr M logttoa. and dumb <aadM^ Aat aid In tetrlnr -ep •. <0"^ many dmee It. e« to th. dire worked to death. Price 25 Cents D E N ISON S BLACKFACE ------ SERIES ------ The Booster Club of Blackville T.S.DENISON ©COMPANY PUBLISHERS CHICAGO i Song Programs for Minstrels Complete Words and Music, Each Program, Postpaid, $3.75 One of the most importent points; in arranging a minstrel show is to get, not only the best possible songs, but the best possible combination of songs, and then to program them in the most effective sequence. The fot lowing programs are properly chosen and arranged and have been .carefully tested; ' , - .........*•- ’ SWANEE SONG PROGRAM Searchlight Opening Chorus. He’s a. Small-Town - Sport. When I Hear a Lullaby, It Brings Back Home, Sweet Home.. Tony Barroni. I. Missed My Train. Dreams, Dreams, Dreams.. I’m the Kid That Built the Pyramid. A Coop’s Doxology. Gee! I Wish I Had a Sweetheart . Just Like You. Unconsciously.. 1 My Trixie frqni Dixieland. Finale (included with Opening Chorus). Complete Words and Music.$3.75 Complete 11-Instrument Or.chestration for the Entire Program (no words)...... 5.00 JUBILEE SONG PROGRAM Plantation . Opening Chorus. My Jungle Bungalow. Old Plantation Moon. I Didn’t Ask, He Didn’t Say, So I Don’t Know. Chile-Gon-Carne Eyes. The Night That Timothy Sheenan Married Daphanay McGrew. As Long As I Have You. That’s a Plenty. The Pirate Bold. Fables. Hula Lu. Finale (included with Opening Chorus)., Complete Words and Music $3.75 Complete 11-Instrument Or.chestration for the Entire Program (no words)..... 5.00 DIXIE SONG PROGRAM - Bohemia Opening Chorus.. Let’s Get Together. My Mary. In Wrong, So X-ong. Old Fashioned Rose* Pat Casey’s Runabout? Then They* Start All Over Again. Orange Blossom’Moon. De Wes’ Wind Blows from de Wes’. Down Along Some Shady Lane. Look Out Below. Bohemia Finale' (included in Open.ing Chorus). Complete Words and Music.$3.75 Complete 11-Instrument Or.chestration for the Entire Program (no words)...... 5.00 ALABAMA SONG PROGRAM Operatic Opening-Chorus. Swanee River Blues. Chinese Love Song. In the Evening; By the Moonlight, Long Ago. I’ve . Had 57 Varieties of Sweet.hearts. 2 Mud Pie Days. ’ My Mammy’s Twilight Lullaby. Steppin’ Around. Old Fashioned Rose. If I Was What I Ain’t Instead of What I Is. Cleopatra.- Finale (included with Opening Chorus). Complete Words and Music.$3.75 Complete 11-Instrument Or.chestration for the Entire Program (no words)...... 5.00 T. 8. DENISON & COMPANY, Publishers 623 South Wabash Avenue CHICAGO THE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE A COLORED COMEDY CONCOCTION BY HARRY L. NEWTON AUTHOR OF "A Bundle of Burnt Cork Comedy” “Hey, Rube!” “Jayville Junction” “Marriage and After” “Me and My Dozvn Trodden Sex” ‘(My Friend Frits” “An Oyster Stew?. “Pickles for Two,” “A Special Sale,” “Si and I,” “A Tramp with a Tramp,” “The Troubles of Rosinski” “Uncle Bill at the Vau.deville,” “Women’s Ways,” “Good. Mornin, Judge,” and “Words to the Wise” CHICAGO T. S. DENISON & COMPANY Publishers   THE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. CHARACTERS. Hon. Bill Johnson..Running for Judge Abraham Lincoln Washington. ...Running for Chickens William Bilkins SmithRunning for Anything Charles Augustus I Ioteoot.'/'oo Slow to Run for Anything James Jackson Muchmouth.. .Running for a Crap Game Garfield Fussfeathers. ..................A Chicken Inspector Alexander Brutus Thicklips. ... .Pork Chops Inspector Rufus Rastus GoggenhetmerHealth Inspector Horace Wetweather Cutup. .Razor Inspector Michael Angelo Wishbone.  .An Artist Time—Just Before a Political Campaign. Time of Playing—About Twenty-five Minutes. COSTUMES. All costumes to be as grotesque as circumstances will per.mit, following your own ideas, Or, per the following sug.gestions, as you may see fit: For instance, Hon. Bill John.son wears a black Prince Albert coat, red vest, green neck.tie, high white collar and old straw hat. All others to be dressed equally as ridiculous.’ All characters black-face. A singing quartette should play the parts of Hotfoot, Wash.ington, 'Muchmouth and Fussfeathers, and a few songs may be successfully introduced in places indicated in sketch. STAGE DIRECTIONS. R. means right of the stage; C., center; R. C., right center; L., left; 1 E., first entrance; U. E., upper entrance, etc. ; D. F., door in flat or back of the stage. The actor is sup.posed to be facing the audience. COPYRIGHT, 1907, BY T. S. DENISON. 2 MADE IN U. S. A. THE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. Scene : Club room of the Booster Club. Doors R. and L. A table about four feet wide and six feet long stands center stage. Table is covered with a black cloth except top, which is covered with paper painted black; a board of sufficient width to permit a man to stand on it being placed across the center. On floor inside table is placed something soft, to permit a man’s fall without injury; there is also a dummy figure, with very fine wire attached, running into flies, as per instructions at finish of sketch. The following “props” are necessary. Large wooden razor for Hotfoot; a dozen ordinary tin horns and two large imitation firecrackers, one’ with practical fuse.. At rise of curtain Hotfoot is discovered sitting in chair with feet on table, asleep; he has a feather duster in right hand. At curtain well up Muchmouth enter R: door, discovers Hotfoot, goes to him, takes duster out of his hand, tickles his face with feathers. Hotfoot (slightly moving his position, but not opening eyes). I done told yo’ dat chicken needed more singeing. Muchmouth (dropping duster, astonished). Well, what yo’ all think of dat? Dat nigger eats chicken in his sleep. (Laughs.) Dat chicken needs more singeing. Ha, ha, ha 1 (Picks up duster.) He’s de laziest coon dat ever drawed de breath of life, Tf he got as much as a dollar a week wages he’d hire somebody to do his breathin’ fo’ him. Charles Augustus Hotfoot, I’m a-goin* to give yo’ all a hotfoot on de foot. (Hits Hotfoot’s foot with wood end of duster.) Hotfoot (not moving). De man on de front platform has got my .transfer. Muchmouth. Dat doggOne coon done thinks he’s fakin' a car ride now. I’ll give him a transfer all right. (Pounds Hotfoot on back, yells.).; Here, yo’, wake up! wake up! 3 4 THE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. Hotfoot (not moving), Let me off at— (Name local street). Muchmouth (laughs, loudly). Dere ain’t no mixed blood in him. He’s all coon and den some. Nobody but a real coon can sleep like dat. (Drops duster, then looks at Hotfoot and slowly scratches head reflectively.) How am I goin’ to wake him up ? Oh, pshaw! Why didn’t I think of dese befo’? (Pulls a pair of dice from his pocket, then goes t& table, rattles thein his hand and then throws dice on tabl'e.) Come on, dice, be good to me; baby wants a new automobilly. Hotfoot (at rattle of dice, slowly opens his eyes, then blinks them: very fast, then when dice strike the table he lets his feet fall to floor and then zvhirls about to look at dice, yells) : Little Joe! Two bits yo’ don’t come. Muchmouth (grabbing dice and putting them in his pocket; speaks in dignified manner). Mr. Hotfoot, as much as I may desire to dally, wid de festive dice, I want to say right here dat dis am no time fo’ dem. De why and wherefo’ am dese: Hotfoot (sitting down). Proceed wid your obligations, Mr. Muchmouth. Muchmouth. Well; de because of de non existence of de welcome appearance qjf- a couple of dice, are dese: De Booster Club of Blackville, of y^hich I am a honored mem.ber— Hotfoot (yawning). Me, too. Muchmouth. Yo’ ain’t nothin’, shut up! De Booster •Club am a-goin’ to enter de cornin’ campaign wid de deter.mination to elect one of our honored and disdinguished members to de bench— .Hotfoot. De wash bench? Muchmouth. No, no; a judge’s bench. We’re a goin’ to elect de Hon. Bill Johnson to a seat on de bench. Hotfoot. De Hon. Bill Johnson will make a great judge. He’s, a good judge now—of gin. Muchmouth. And he’s a good judge, too. Hotfoot. None better. He’s tried all de gin dat ever was made. SNOHOMISH • CENTRALIA, LAFAYETTE | ol-WmU n VftinsWX. Description ____hjfof Inventory No.lSj) THE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. 5 Muchmouth Well, dat ain’t neither here no^dere. Hotfoot. No, I wish some of it was here. I’m dry so^eariv dT7W‘ " ?- yaSOn 1 came down to de club room so early dis eyenin is because— (pause). Hotfoot {pause). I thought dat was de reason. Muc^movth.. Was because—I mean, is because I wished to get everythin’ in redine® fo’ to receive our exalted and renowed guest of de evenin’—Hon. Bill Johnson 1 flakes off hat and makes a low. bow) Hotfoot (standing). Is dat low down niggeXcomin’ down heah dis evenin’? 1 >L°ok heah’ Mr- Charles Augustus Hot- foqt’ where do yo get a license to make so much noise ? i o am t so many. Hotfoot. I reckon yo’ ain’t counted me lately. bre“d” vXTn M “"’J ”o,hin,’ b“‘ * M-M-Ilp Alaba™ breed yo self. Don t forget dat yo’ am talkin’ to a genuine hundS C° Ored perS°n’ and a member of de Georgia four Hotfoot. Yes de other three hundred and ninety-nine amt done served out dere sentence yet. 7 My ch mouth. Furthermore and howsome ever, yo’ ain’t nothin but de janitor of dis club room, understand? De man sweeps de Soo, clean W me ,0 walk <S under' Hotfoot- Yes an’ every time yo’ walk on de floor dat PT*t overworked broom looks at me and says - “Here’= whereM got to go to work agin/’ Understand Muchmouth. Don’t you dire insinuate dat I’m not on speakin terms wid a cake of soap - Hotfoot. I don’t ’sinuate..: .. Muchmouth. Dat's right—don’t insinuate. M?cHM0UTHW°Oh bUth°’T? St°P me from Eludin'. IVIULHMOUTH, On, pooh-pooh ! •. Hotfoot. De same to yo’ and a couple of tuttuts besides. Enter Washington, door R. do^SHHoHont Unified attitude just inside aoor). Hotfoot, why dont yo open dem door? (Hot- Space Ncfc $ 1 6 TJTE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. foot and Muchmouth look at each other and laugh.') Well, what am de cause of dem laughs? , Muchmouth. We has to laugh at de grammar yo talk. Hotfoot. Yes, it am scandiculous. Washington. What did I done said ? Muchmouth. Yo’ all said: “Why didn’t yo’ open dem door ?”- Washington. Well, ain’t dat correct? Muchmouth. Decidedness no. Yo’ should a said: “Why didn’t you open those door,” not dem door. Hotfoot. Yes, de adjetatum always follows de adjeta- tive. I’m susprised at your vo-cab-o-lie-rich. Washington. Yo’ little shrimp, I’ll swallow yo in a moment. , Hotfoot. If yo’ do you’ll have more brains in yo stom.ach den yo’ ever had in yo’ head. (They advance threaten.ingly toward each other.) Muchmouth (between). Gentlemen, gentlemen; dont have trouble wid each other. Hotfoot. Trouble? AVid him? Not on yo life. He d be a cinch fo’ me—not trouble at all. Washington. I didn’t come heah to fight no. low down person. Hotfoot. Well, I ain’t so particular. Muchmouth. Now, now; don’t be peevish. Yo am makin’ too much noise. Washington. Yes, bein’ as it ain’t de Fourth of July. Hotfoot. AVell, any time yo’ think I ain t a whole bunch of firecrackers, just get warm around me and watch me explode—dat’s all. Muchmouth. Heah, heah! Yo’ am makin too much noise in one spot. Move around a little and scatter it scatter it! (Knock sounds on door R. outside.) Washington (to Hotfoot). Mr. Peevish Janitor, dere am a knock on those door. Muchmouth. Yes, dar arm someone widout. Hotfoot. Widout what ? THE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. 7 Muchmouth. Go out and see. (Hotfoot sits down.) Washington (to Hotfoot). Did yo’ heah Mr. Much.mouth address yo’ ? Hotfoot. Yes, I heah him. Washington. Did yo’ also heah dat knock on those door? Hotfoot. Yes, I done heah dem knock on dose doah. Muchmouth. Well, dem knock on dose doah means dat a gemmen outside is desirious of enterin’. Hotfoot. Dere ain’t no gemmen out dere. Dere is only a common nigger; and if he is desirious of enterin’ he can open de doah and walk in. Washington (threateningly). Yo’ had better open dat doah. Hotfoot. I better hadn’t. Washington. Yo’ better had. HotfOot (pulls large razor from hip pocket and feels of edge), I better hadn’t. Washington (looks at razor). Den I better had. (Goes to door R., opens it.) Enter Fussfeathers door R., stands with arms folded across breast, just inside door. Muchmouth (to Hotfoot). Denounce de gemmen. Hotfoot. Denounce, him yo’self. Muchmouth. De gemmen am waitin’ to be denounced. Yo’ better denounce him. Hotfoot (significantly displaying razor). I better hadn’t. Muchmouth. Yo’ better had. -Hotfoot (rising and advancing threateningly toward Muchmouth). I better hadn’t. Muchmouth. Den I better had. (To Fussfeathers.) Mr. Garfield Fussfeathers, yo’ am denounced. Come in and take a chair. Hotfoot. Yes, come in and take all de chairs—we don’t care. (The four take chairs, bring them to table, sit down and put feet on table. All should wear large shoes, and when feet are placed on table a good comedy effect may 8 THE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. be produced by moving the eight feet back and forth, and on top of each other, etc.} Much mouth (after comedy effect with feet}. A few members of de Booster Club am now congregated. What am on de table dis evenin’? Hotfoot. Feet—dat’s all—feet. Washington. I move dat de feet be removed. MUCH MOUTH. I-,, second de motion and forthwith set de example, (puts feet on floor.} Fussfeathers. Me too. (Feet on floor.} Washington. Me too. (Washington puts his feet on .floor. Hotfoot keeps feet on table and the other three look inquiringly at him for a few seconds.) I said I moved dat de feet be removed from de table. Muchmouth. And I done second de motion. Fussfeathers. Me too.' '. HOTFOOT. I prefer to keep my beloved feet on de table. Muchmouth. Vo’ better hadnf. Hotfoot. I better had. (Pulls razor.} Washington. I move dat Brother Hotfoot keeps his feet on de table.. . . . , . . , ? Muchmouth. De razor am mightier den de power ot speech, thereto’ second de motion. Fussfeathers. Me too. .- Muchmouth (to Fussfeathers). Brother Fussfeathers, bow am everythin’ wid yo’ all? . ... ' . Hotfoot. . His name am a guarantee dat chickens must roost high at night if dey desire to cackle in de mornin . Fussfeathers. Brother Hotfoot will heah from me 1 Hotfoot. \es, later am right. Dat’s de onlyiest time chickens heah yo’—later at night. Washington (to Fussfeathers). Ignore him. Ignore him! Muchmouth. Yes, ignore him. " . Fussfeathers (to Hotfoot). -Yo’ am ignored—what.ever dat is. To tell de truth- - , Hotfoot. Fer de first time in yo lite— THE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. .9 Fussfeathers. Yo’ am ignored. To tell de truth, I ain’t been feelin’ very well lately. Hotfoot. Dere’s dat lately again. . . Muchmouth. I am indeed sorry fo’ to heah of yo recent illness. What seemed to be de mattah? Fussfeathers. De doctor said it was a slight attack of chicken-pox. . . Hotfoot (laughs uproariously}. Chicken-pox? Fussfeathers. DaBs what I exclaimed—chicken-pox. Hotfoot. Den dat should be a lesson to yo’. Let chick.ens alone in de heahafter. Quartette may introduce here one or two songs. At con.clusion of singing enter William Bilkens Smith, door R. Smith. How-de-do, men. Hotfoot. Gemmen, yo’ mean. • Smith. I said men. Hotfoot. I said gemmen. Yo’ better say gemmen. Smith. I better hadn’t. Hotfoot (pulls razor}. Yo’ better had. , Smith (not looking at Hotfoot). I said I better hadnt, and I never change mah mind. Muchmouth. I’ll bet yo’ change yo’ mind in a minute, if dere is any left to change. . " ' Smith. I said I never change mah mind—(turns and sees Hotfoot, who is flourishing razor; blinks his eyes, etc., then} I never change mah mind on a Thursday—but dis am a Tuesday. I always change mah mind on a Tuesday. Hotfoot. Den we am all gemmen ? Smith. Yo’ am. Hotfoot. Den take off yo’ hat and bow pretty. Smith. Eh? • •• Hotfoot. I said take off yo’ hat and bow pretty. Smith. I don’t know how to bow pretty. Hotfoot (fingering razor}. Oh, yes, yo does. Smith. Come to think of it, I does. (Takes off hat and bows.: All ’laugh.} Hotfoot (to Smith). A-few more lessons and yoll be 10 THE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. a right pert bower. Dey tell me yo' all am goin’ to run fo’ somethin’ in de cornin’ campaign. Smith. I sure am goin’ to run. Hotfoot. I reckon yo’ all better start now. (Chases Smith, razor in hand, about stage and then runs off R., then comes back to center stage.) I believe dat everybody should get a good start when dey run for office. Much mouth. Look heah, Hotfoot, yo’ ain’t got no right to dictate to weuns round heah. Yo’ ain’t de President of de Booster Club; are yo’ de President ? Hotfoot. No, sah; heah am de President. (Holds up razor.) And de Secretary and de whole doggone shootin’ match. He am strictly business, too. Anytime yo’ am desir- ious of questionin’ his authority, I’ll see dat yo’ get a special permit—a special permit, sah. Fussfeathers. What am Brother Smith a-runnin’ fo’? Hotfoot. Because he can’t fly. Fussfeathers. I meant what political office was he a-runnin’ fo’ ? Muchmouth. We don’t know. Hotfoot. Well, he’s got a fine start; he ought to catch whatever he’s after. Enter Goggenheimer and Wishbone, R. Wishbone (to Hotfoot). Heah, boy, take my hat. (Offers hat.) ^**CteGEN. Yes, boy, take our hats. (Offers hat.) Hotfoot, Say, who do yo’ all think yo’ all am talkin’ to? Wishbone. To de highly esteemed janitor of de Booster Club. ^—GogGEN. Yes, to de highly esteemed— Hotfoot. Well, I ain’t highly steamed; but I’m gettin’ warm—gettin* mighty warm. Yo’ better keep yo’ old hats. Wishbone. We better hadn’t. _Goggen. No, we better hadn’t. Hotfoot (reaching for razor). De President of de Booster Club reckons yo’ better had. Wishbone. We better hadn’t—President or no President. Goggen. No, we better hadn’t—not fo’ four Presidents. THE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. U Muchmouth (aside). I bet dey better had. Hotfoot (pulls razor, whets it on door, then feels edge). De President reckons as how yo’ all better keep yo’ hats. Any objection to de motion? Goggen and Wishbone (together). It am entirely agree- able daT"we shall retain our hats. (Both put hats on.) Hotfoot. Take dem hats off. Goggen and Wishbone (together). We don’t seem to do xlatanS^we shall retain our hats. (Both put hats on.) Hotfoot. Well, jes’ take ’em off. De rules and regu- malations of dis heah club particular specify and prescribe dat no hats be on de head. CngfigN. I know dat, but yo’ all got yours on. I know I has/ but I carries a special permit, see? (Flourishes razor.) We see. Wishbqne. Me too. They all gather about table and engage in shooting dice, then enter Cutup and Thicklips. They pay no attention to the others, but come down stage to converse. Thicklips. I tell yd*, sah, de issue of dis campaign is— Hotfoot. Rats! (He is busy with dice and apparently does not see Thicklips.) Thicklips (looking all about). Rats! Who said rats? Cutup. I reckon it was one of deni low-down coons yonder. Thicklips. I reckon it was, Brother Cutup. As I was sayin’, we must put our shoulders to de wheel and all work together fo’ de good of— Hotfoot (rolling dice). Little Joe—little Joe! Thicklips. Little Joe? Dat sounds familiar like. (Winks his eyes.) Cutup (pulling Thicklips’ sleeve). Dere am a crap game in full operation yonder. Thicklips (looks at group at table). Dere am a sus.picious goin’s on all right. Dat must be stopped. (Calls.) Heah, yo’, if yo’ all am a-shootin’ craps, stop it! Cutup. Yes, stop it. 12 THE BOOSTER CLUB OF:BLACKVILLE. Hotfoot (turning). Who’s a-talkin’? Cutup. Two prominent members of de Booster Club. Hotfoot. How prominent am yo’ ? ThicklipH I am Alexander Brutus. Thicklips, pork chops inspector. • . . Cutup. And I am Horace Wetweather Cutup razor inspector. Hotfqot (coming to them). Well, I ain’t so glad to know yo I ain’t got no pork chops, about me to be inspected, but I got my friend, Mr. Razor. (Pulls razor.) \o can start in inspectin’ dat any time yo’ am desirious or same. Cutup .(backing away).- I ain’t on duty dis evenin' Hotfoot (to Thicklips). How about yo’? Thicklips (backing awgy). If yo’ ain’t got no pork chops about yo clothes dat need inspectin’, dat lets me out thank yo. Hotfoot. Don’t mention it .(Bows low.) Smith enter door Rl‘ running. Smith Hooray! hooray! here comes- de Hon. Bill Johnson. Everybody hurry to give him welcome. (All exit door R., cheering, except Hotfoot. He sits on table.) Hotfoot. Any old time I hurry up to give welcome to Bill J ohnson—I should say not nit. I knows dat Bill Johnson and he knows me. He ain’t nothin’ but a low-down black whitewasher. If he am elected judge, and he ever gets me- in front of him—well, I can see mah finish through iron bars—dat s all. - Horns are blown off stage, then cheers follow and all corne on door R., Johnson in center, strutting proudly with one hand thrust in breast of coat and bowing right- qnd left. He steps on chair, then on table, while all blow horns and cheer. Muchmouth. Silence! Members of de Booster Club of Blackville, allow me to introduce t yo’ de Honorable Bill Johnson, nominee fo’ judge of de circuit court. (All cheer and blow hornsA . . y THE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. 13 Hotfoot (aside);.' I’ll dare him to make a speech. Muchmouth. Judge, we’d feel honored if you would favor us wid one of your celebrated speeches. (All cheer and blow.) Johnson. Friends and fellow citizens. On dis, de evenin’ of one of de greatest campaigns in de history of— de history of— Hotfoot (aside),. De judge am stuck. Johnson, Well, whatever history it is. Dere are so many histories dat it am impossible to disremember which one dis is. However, yo’ all knows jes’ as well as I does, so I won’t linger longer on dat subject, but pass on to de next one. On dis—on dis—(Looks dozen and sees Hotfoot lingering razor). On dis most suspicious Muchmouth (correcting). Auspicious, judge—auspi.cious. Not suspicious. ' Johnson (looking nervously at Hotfoot). Well, it looks mighty suspicious to me. However, yo’ all know jes’ as well as I does, so we’ll pass to de next subject. De question dat am agitatin’ dis country today, is de question of—de question of. However, yo’ all know jes* as well as I does, so we’ll pass to de next subject. (All cheer and blow horns.) Hotfoot (after noise). He’s a great speech maker—I don’t think! Johnson (bowing). Friends, it makes mah heart beat fast when I see de enthuse—enthuse—well, when I see what yo’ all know what I mean, so I’ll not linger no longer, but pass .on to de next subject. De next great question dat am agitatin’ dis glorious country today, am de question of—I de question of^(scratches head reflectively.) Hotfoot (aside). De judge is stuck again. I’ll have to help him out. (Gets off table and exit door R. Others blow horns.) Johnson. However, yo’ all know jes’ as well as I does, so we’ll pass to de next subject. De great vital question dat am gnawin’ at our vitals and givin’ de whole creation de stomach ache, am de race question. Oh, my benumbed .and benighted hearers, de race question am a great thing. De black man ain’t got no show in dis country anymore. 14 THEJ BOOSTER CLUB of BLACKVILLE. Why, jes’ look—jes’ look, my black brethern, at de race question. Last Saturday I bet money on three races and H?S ? bnck ™an an? Chance? No, sah. A white book.maker took all mah money. Oat's de race question fo’ yo’. All blow horns, while Hotfoot enters door R. He has the large firecrackers m his hand; he sneaks to table and ^ireCT^CkerS Wlder lt’ liZhtin£ the one with practical puse, the others pay no attention to him. Johnson (not appearing to notice Hotfoot). I tell vo’ friends and fellow citizens, dere is goin’ to be an upheaval’ (aslde). I wonder if he knows what’s under Pere am g0in' to he ..somethin’ happen purty soon dat 11 shake up some of us black persons— Hotfoot (aside). Yo’ am right, Bill, and you’ll be de hrst one to feel it. • , Johnson. We have been layin’ quiet too long. We need— somethin’ to stir us up. (All cheer.) . ... minuteF00T (aS*de^: And you’ll get somethin’ in jes’ a Johnson Things can’t go on as dey have been goin’. I tell I feel dat somethin’is goin’to happen. Dat underneath dis quietness, dere lies—here lies— Hotfoot (aside). I wonder if he’s wise? JOHNSON. Dere lies an explosive mine dat is waitin’ fer to be ignited by some hot-headed leader, and den will be an eruption. qHotfoot (aside). Yer a good guesser, Bill. Here she (A loud explosion ensues, produced off stage by 'firin? a, shotgun into an empty barrel, a pan of red fire is lighted at same time. As explosion occurs Johnson falls through 1*7 table,af,d disappears from view of audience; another explosion follows and dummy figure is yanked into THE BOOSTER CLUB OF BLACKVILLE. 15 flies, then allowed to fall back into table again. Then Johnson stands up in table. Meanwhile he has made spots on his face with a wet cloth, torn his collar and looks gen.erally disheveled. He faces audience with oratorical effect.) Johnson. However, fellow citizens, yo’ all know as well as I does, so we’ll pass to de next question. (Quick curtain to sheers and blowing of horns, while Hotfoot does a war dance about table.) A Black Recruit By ARTHUR LEROY KASER Price, 25 Cents f°r 2 males. Time, 15 minutes. Private Oilcan, whose pappy was a minute-man in the sixty-second regiment gets Ab first lesson from Sergt. Wise, who has a lot of trouble in mak- ing a soldier out of the new recruit. A lively bit of negro nonsense fainrnpntany minstrel show, vaudeville program or club enter- vadium vii A Pair of Hash Hounds By GENE MORGAN } Price, 25 Cents „BlaoJcface talking act for 2 males. Time, 15 minutes George zTker who nnip hSTh sh°P’ seeks a waiter for his “bean bazaar”’ e* onc® held a job for twenty years because he couldn’t get a pardon, shows inside knowledge of the operation of a “goulash garage?’ A new skit by a new writer with a new line of comedy An Awful Appetite By WADE STRATTON Price, 25 Cents Blackface skit for 2 males. Time, 15 minutes Gus who iq hearing Eustace’s luscious description of how he once had more food than he could eat. But Gus turns the tab?^ darkyS telkSig'act Ts^a5 banquet^f faughs*.6 f°F himSelf'. Tbis Payin’ A Bet By VINCENT DENITO Price, 25 Cents bkit for 2 males. Time, 15 minutes. Unable to settle his crap-shooting debts in cash money, Sam has to nav a bet by riding Henry home in a wheelbarrow. When Sam balks Henry gets oratorical His explanation of the art of debating is immense. A novel sidewalk sketch for minstrels or vaudeville. No Sense, Nohow By ARTHUR LEROY KASER Price, 25 Cents Negro talking act for 2 males. Time, 15 minutes A merrv line of argument for two blackface comedians, with laughs well apportioned, neither character being a feeder. The ragtime dispute m fizzle-fuzzle language” is a scream. Chance for song or dance. T. 8. DENISON & COMPANY, Publishers 623 S. Wabash Ave., CHICAGO Minstrel First-Part Circle. XXII—625 $1.80 6.25 10.00 FLASHY MINSTREL T. 8. DENISON & COMPANY, Publishers 623 South Wabash Avenue CHICAGO IN FULL COLORS Handsomely lithographed post.ers in full colors, for advertising your minstrel show. Four different posters, each in standard half-sheet size (21x28 inches), suitable for either win.dow or outdoor display. The illustra.tions show the three designs greatly re.duced, but the posters themselves must be seen to appreciate the rich color combinations which combine artistic merit with strong advertising value. They are made exclusively for our customers, and are not obtainable else.where. They are flashy and catchy, arresting attention instantly. "Vater strips,” announcing date and place of your show, can be made by your local printer and pasted to bottom edge of posters. Please note: We do not im.print posters; we do not handle de.signs other than those here listed; posters come in one size only. Due to difficulty and,expense in packing and mailing, each order must be for at least one dozen. Quantity orders may be assorted. Be sure to specify de.signs wanted. THE DESIGNS Minstrel First-Part Circle. Minstrel Endman. Minstrel Man and Girl. Minstrel Comedian. PRICES Per Dozen, Postpaid Per 50, Postpaid.... Per 100, Postpaid...    JJJJ"                             W    I    W             Minstrel Comedian'   GGGGHGGGG Ready-Made MmsTrel First-Parts A choice of five complete routines, expertly arranged and ready to use, for the convenience of inexperienced amateur minstrel directors and others seeking a modern, properly constructed first-part. Instead of being a volume of miscella.neous crossfire from which to pick and choose, each book gives an exact pro.cedure to be followed in staging a sure-fire first-part—complete dialogue and full instructions for action and stage business from rise of curtain to grand finale. These books will prove a salvation for the many amateur minstrel troupes which lack the personal counsel and guidance of an experienced director. Thoroughly professional in style, yet entirely practical for amateurs, and give big oppor.tunity for localized jokes. Written to order especially for troupes wishing to stage an expertly routined show at a nominal cost. Each first-part will consume about one hour and can be used for a troupe of any size, large or small. Music is not included, but the respective song programs can be obtained complete from the publishers. Swanee Minstrel First-Part, by John E. Lawrence.... Price, 25 Cent*. Dixie Minstrel First-Part, by John E. Lawrence.Price, 25 Cents. Jubilee Minstrel First-Part, by John E. LawrencePrice, 25 Cents. Alabama Minstrel First-Part, by Arthur Le Roy Kaser.Price, 25 Cents. Darktown Minstrel First-Part, by Wade Stratton..... Price, 25 Cents. When Cork Is King By Wade Stratton. A rich store of bright, snappy material for building up a minstrel show and affording lively chatter for first-part and olio. Con.veniently arranged with subdivisions under which are assorted first-part cross fire, end gags and comebacks; end jokes for female minstrels; minstrel miscellany in.cluding verses, conundrums and short bits of catchy humor; seven dandy mono.logues; three fast blackface skits. Price, Postpaid, 40 Cents. How to Stage a Minstrel Show By Jeff Branen and Frederick G. Johnson. This book is to every amateur minstrel director what blue-prints are to a builder. Explains modern styles of minstrels and novelty minstrels; how to put the show together; how to organize the troupe and conduct rehearsals; where to get material; the opening chorus; it discusses first-part, olio, afterpiece, costumes, make-up, scenery, music, pub.licity, program arrangement, etc. Eight full-page illustrations showing various first-part settings. Price, Postpaid, 35 Cents. Laughland,a Merry Minstrel Book By Harry L. Newton. Over a hundred pages of endmen’s jokes, cross fire dialogues, conundrums, comic verse, rapid repartee, talking skits, minstrel mono.logues, and stump speeches. A veritable storehouse of burnt cork comedy of great aid in getting up a funny entertainment of almost any description. Worth many times its cost to the director who is in search of stuff that has not been, worked to death. Price, Postpaid, 40 Cents. T. S. DENISON & COMPANY, Publishers, 623 South Wabash Avenue, CHICAGO » . - 5s easy .to apply— all you use is wafer. . < . They’re durable, sun- tested, washable. - ° . It’s tun- -Akrd hxdsts so little -— t o MH > u f i § y your home with b4****?Ty o*2LL- Be Your Own Oecorator— . . . Add cofor™gu efy—- warmth to Wrmturs, and accessories with BEAUTY SPOT DECALS! ___ ..pHty*8*’ 11 *U**A &y MEYERCORD 3 EASY STEPS 3 Smooth design dawn with cloth » and allow to dry thoroughly. -M MMM I HE HARRY T. °ETERS COl LECTION. MUSEUM OF THE CITY OF NEW YORK THE GRANGER COLLECTION MARIAN, WHO HAS NO MAID, SHOWS HELEN HOW TO KEEP HER DtSH CLOTH SWEET AND FRESH iIHIB •ELLA AREN'T YOU ASHAM4 OF THOSE TOWELS . AND THAT DISH 'Red Cross Towels -D, j WELL* HELEN, DON'T FIRE A GOOD COOK FOR THAT.. GIVE HER A ROLL OF RED CROSS TOWELS FOR MESSY KITCHEN JOBS. MARIAN, I'M . | UPSET abPut ; ELLA MAY. SHE'S f A GRAND COOK, I BUT SOCAR£LESS! j NEVER RINSES OUT-' A DISH RAG. It RIGHTS...As it SEATS...As It SWEEPS...As it CLEANS MA'AM, I'SE SORRY,BUT I PLUMB FORGOT TO WASH 'EM OUT. r~~~------—-— HERE.. - SEE HOW EASY IT 15 TO CLEAN OUT GREASY PANS WITH RED CROSS TOWELS ! THERE 'S NO NEED TO SOIL YOUR DISH RAG. THEY’RE HANDY AND REALLY COST SO LITTLE - 21 ROLLS AND FIXTURE FOR FIFTY CENTS. NOW MY DISH RAG SMELLS MIGHTY SWEET t USE RED CROSS FOR. . » moppmg up spilled foods’ • HsWmK tytit tefrjgt'tajQr ' • 'taking wtpitig up the table - Before ychi replace, iltat old cleaner,'be sure you see VUMWyek. M tzWiiir M AM MeWr UJM inere DA j-urthde WW»W pwMst! -VWiitzs bas been aAdWLia i!« W vibintea Ms r«g—stajfces wiWS- Oitz decp-tmrttztl', WK-KrKUA twite-; .ithtifs MchSE rflii'ifHiy. Tlie wiittiiinline-'t M Me. new Seriiinfel Scries H<><iver were dsaMned by fitttUiltS' Stylists . . . th/ii'i ffyi-vei' Iwrntlv- 'It'* light and easy to handle,. «-<>!>. .bttffeift Dirt. ' 'Finder' allows yoij' Wiurt? dirt is. LaPiWnMs'wW^dil! WMsiglw dmhiiMM HchMM a ... thtts'-s Ji < -M'L wily tim-ugh EM«! witlf hiihtfed.iitjiieseritati, wety. TieiKMEhitod wto ary giad t->Mli »nd! youelltfr- .^,'1 co,®ea- Hwwer q ..,.u&e't Bwk .... a .? HOOVER |M»MH sink who first blacked his face and appeared on the American stage as a carica 7 had already been established in 1828 when Thomas ("Daddy") Rice pof. , "Jump Jim Crow." The phrase "Jim Crow" later became a synonym for se ze that soon followed the song's popularization contributed to the stereot pt was published at the height of the craze. 7 kinds of stains discolor teeth — “Sure it'll satin your teeth, Sambo, But' so d oes ii'ti yd-hrng c Ise yt m eat—‘and'd ri o k! All cold, your thrce-mea!s-;i-day leave 7 different kinds of stains,oti your teeth. . “Bur jw should worry! For Colgate's removes, all 7 .stains—leaving your teeth .beautifully clean—a pleasure to behold." And that’s where Colgate’s has a big edge on other toothpastes. Colgate's removes Know why ? Because Cplgiite’s has two cleansing actions where most toothpastes have only on?. And oh! how those teeth of yours need BOTH actions. For ail stains will not yield to wr—and if you don’t remove them ail, they gradu.ally build up, dulling your teeth, clouding their natural brilliance. So get a tube of Colgate’s Ribbon Dental Cream and try it. The emulsive action will dissolve and wash away some of the stains that food and drink leave on your teeth. The safe, gentle polishing action will re.move rhe stains chat are left. At rhe end of 10 days, look in rhe mirror —and see the best-looking teeth you’ve ever Why Does a Pickaninny Love Watermelon? •Tse cornin’, you big boy, I heah you calling me. Ma mouth am watering t’ taste yo’ sweetness” . . . . Luscious, red-ripe watermelon — what an over-powering appeal to his craving appetite! The tempting taste of Blatz Grape Gum “gets you” in the same way. Simply irresistible. The greatest gum sensation in years. Ask for Blatz, insist on the original grape gum. Also get acquainted with its peppy companion — Blatz Mint Gum, full of real, old-fashioned pepperin int. Sold everywhere. Look for the name, Blatz. There’s a world of difference in the taste. “Everybody Loves It ” HORSE CAR SPORTS GOING TO A CHICKEN SHOW. ALL FLUSH. 1933 I (1928 BRER THULDY’S STATUE LIBERTY FRIGHTENIN DE WORLD. To be stuck up on Beta's Island - Jarsey Rats.opposit de United States. (Only Authorized Edition,)’ “G UNCLE’ v Creani nf IVhenf Co 1921 Paint I’d by Edward V Brewer far "A COLORED SUPPLEMENT" (dream of Wheat Co Copyright 1916 by Cream of Wheat Co. 1916 w Copt. 1915 P. K. W. MILWAUKEE A “SIGHT DRAFT”—WITH INTEREST 4* PHOENIX SILK HOSE fox- lasting service- ^and style unsurpassed.. Mens 50* to450per patr-’ Women's 75* to*2 per pair—' Misses 75* per pair' Infants 25*&.5O^ser pair AT THE BEST SHOP^ Made in the "U.S.A by trhe PHOENIX KNITTING WORKS 234 Broadu>a;>, M.ilu>aukee 1915 We believe you will agree that these are sensi.ble and necessary suggestions . . . easy for most WDM Just what distant lands these heavy rt army Brogans are bound for is a " military secret. But one thing is certain. When they step off the train at camp or embarkation point, the men who wear them will be rested and ready for action. On long, cross-country trips, troops are gswg Pullman! During the first six months of 1942, more than 3,000,000 soldiers, sailors and marines traveled in Pullman sleeping cars —565,200 of them in June alone. That keeps a lot of Pullman cars in con.stant military service,, with lots more standing by for orders day and night. So far, Pullman has been able to handle its mili.tary duties without seriously disrupting civilian passenger service, even with troop travel at an all- time high and civilian traffic running ZO percent ahead of 1941. But a word of caution is in order. The extent to which Pullman can continue to serve civilians de.pends considerably on yourcooperation. For exam.ple, you can help tremendously if you will follow these four simple wartime travel rules: 1* Make your Pullman reservations early. 2» Cancel your space promptly if plans change. Ask your ticket salesman on what days travel is lightest and try to go on those days. Take as little luggage as possible. travellers to observe. When you do so, you help make capacity use of all the Pullman sleeping cars that remain available for civilian service after trobp train requirements have been supplied. And that means, you help all wartime travelers—your.self among them—get the "sleep going" they must have in order to "keep going" at the pace they must maintain, "H’s sleep that counts!” says this experienced Pullman passenger. "These days, I don’t always get the exact type of Pullman space I ask for. Bur I tie get privacy and the sleep-inviting comfort of a full-sized Pullman bed, whether I travel in an upper, a lower, a section or a room," SLEEP GOING — TO KEEP GOING- go 'Pt/LLM/W REEP YOUR PLEDGE TO BUY WAR BONOS ANO STAMPS 1942 They spend the most where the most is spent 82% of THE NEW YORKER’S circulation is concentrated in the 41 city-trading areas where most of the retail dollars are spent. Top stores in those areas have proved (by checking charge accounts) that NEW YORKER subscribers are top spenders. Ditto when those subscribers travel: They go to the best places in the best style with bulging wallets .. . which explains why THE NEW YORKER carries more hotel and resort advertising than any other national magazine. NEW YORKER readers are dream patrons. They spend the most where the most is spent. THE NEV WORKER. No. 25 VE5T 43RD STREET NEV YORK, 18, N. Y. SELLS THE PEOPLE OTHER PEOPLE COPY 1949 Because slaves were never called Mr. or Mrs.fi white children used the terms Aunt and Uncle to address elderly hlacks in a respectful way. The use of these titles continued in all forms of popular culture well into the twentieth century. 1919 Ham is the universally popular meat food for all occasions, and Armour s Stockinet Star Ham Is the maximum of food utility'-. More than this it is a standard of quality and value by Mm. h Label Prod- nets may be judged. For Stockinet Star Ham is the per- Covering and it was experience that produced the Stockinet. Buy a icholc Star Ham. It s economical. Armour’s Stockinet Star Ham, its companion. Star Bacon, and all the other Oval Label Products are not only banquet foods because of their delicious arc thrift foods; for, they have high food value as well as good taste. Ask your dealer for Oval Label Send for This Book—Let a Dime Save Vou Dollars! ARMOUR V-COMPANY 1917 THE c)t tasted do 2 GLASS SIZE 10/ FAMILY SIZE .OW lower prices for bigger bottles of delicious Hires! Always refreshing and healthful... all the time... every.where ... at home or office, while shopping or driving ... for sale at groceries, restaurants, refreshment stands. Always insist on genuine Hires. You’ll enjoy its natural, wholesome flavor. THE LABEL IS FOR YOUR PROTECTION —A GUARANTEE OF REAL Root Juices IN HIRES ROOT BEER It’s the real \Jlooi ^Juiced that make Hires taste better than imitation root beers rhe Charles k Hires Company, Philadelphia. "It seems to me wonderfully symbolic of our age that the only son of Abraham Lincoln should have become the president of the Pullman Company? that the son of the man who liberated the slaves politically should have done more than any other ... to exploit them industrially. Van Wyck Brooks, “The Dream of a National Culture” (1917) 1937 Them ing authorities look upon as a real trouble-maker. vV XVHI^- 76% Improved in Clinical Test The amazing 4-way action of this wonderful anti.septic explains, we believe, why 76% of the dandruff sufferers in one clinic who used Listerine and massage twice a day obtained either marked improvement in, or complete disappearance of, the symptoms of dandruff within M davs. iNo wonder porters arc singing the Blues... no won.der so many men look neater, tidier .. . no wonder dark suits are more in evidence than they used to be— More and more people are reporting that the infec.tious type of dandruff and its tell-tale flakes and scales are on the defensive”—thanks to Listerine Antiseptic. They find Listerine such a real help! And thousands are talking about the way Listerine goes after the itching, inflammation, and other distress of this common dis- jfff „ux with Listerine Antiseptic and massage. (live Listerinc a chance to do for you what, it has done for so many others. (live it a chance to combat distressing flakes and scales ... to clean and invigorate the scalp ... to allay inflammation ... to attack millions of the germs that accompany infectious dandruff, including Pityrosporum Ovale, the strange “bottle bacillus” that lead- wbisk them - - eu-' kT ZE sistent massage with lingers or a good hairbrush. Continue the treatment so long as dandruff is in evidence. And even though you’re free from dandruff, enjoy a Listerine massage once a week to guard against infection. Listerine Antiseptic is the same antiseptic that has been famous for more than 50 years as a Mouth wash arid gargle. The treatment is easy and delightful I eased condition of tire scalp. Have you tried Listerine? If you have the .slightest evidence of an infectious dandruff condition, don’t delay treatment. Start now \ <>u 11 actually enjoy using Listerine, even though its action M medicinal. It's so cooling ... so refreshing ... so stimulating. See panel to right. Start using Listerine today if you have any evidence of infectious dandruff. Lambert Pharmaeal Co,, 67, Loui#, Mo. LISTERINE for Infectious Dandruff i94i